Leopard Kung Fu

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CMyers0323

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Ok but he is not on his legs. No foot no punch. That type of patty cake strike won’t get very far outside of a forms competition. This is my biggest issue with CMA videos, it’s usually just flowery hands and no basics foundations. Yes it’s a leopard fist, but used like that, it’s just as useful to cut the hand off and throw it at the opponent. He talks about the circling motion, but the circle is from the humerus bone not the wrist. No shade on you, just saying that the bulk of YouTube videos on CMA are crap.
I've been taught the same so I agree. In terms of the hand technique it's pretty interesting. It reminds of of the whipping like power I've read about. Yeah I can't say exactly for him I mean he seems legit but obviously I can't vouch but I do agree with having a strong foundation. I could say atleast in today's society it's lacking due to people not wanting to put in the effort. I've noticed with new students when I teach they really can't handle it, aren't interested, or some other silly reason and really just want those Flowery techniques but that obviously like you said can cause issues.
 

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I've been taught the same so I agree. In terms of the hand technique it's pretty interesting. It reminds of of the whipping like power I've read about. Yeah I can't say exactly for him I mean he seems legit but obviously I can't vouch but I do agree with having a strong foundation. I could say atleast in today's society it's lacking due to people not wanting to put in the effort. I've noticed with new students when I teach they really can't handle it, aren't interested, or some other silly reason and really just want those Flowery techniques but that obviously like you said can cause issues.
Yes it’s not for people who don’t like exercise. I am lucky to have a few very serious students. They show up consistently and train hard. That has helped me stay true to the training and built a social group that has a certain expectation from new students. The lazy ones don’t last more than a couple of training sessions. It takes a very long time of being patient and doing the monotonous work.
 

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Worth noting a lot of info here doesn't add up...never read this page until today, but even the first picture of leopard fist is all wrong.

Hmm, might be worthwhile going through this later. Sometimes this stuff makes it way into the Wiki and nobody notices.

I've got better pics somewhere in my big zip drive.

 
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Oily Dragon

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That would be great! Wow thats crazy you mentioned Including metal from Xing Yi as that's exactly what my Xing Yi (same instructor mentioned) teaches as well. I'll have to look more into it because I love Xing Yi and always want to learn more. I haven't heard of the 10 pattern fist form you mention but it sounds really interesting.
Sorry, metal from the Wu Xing pentagram, not Xing Yi (though yes, same five elements in Xing Yi, just different techniques).

In southern family styles the metal category represents cutting/splitting etc (like an axe), which is where the leopard splitting cup-fist comes in (and that first pic on the Wiki page aint it, that's someome who wants their fingers broken).

And yeah old manuals often have conflicting stuff that makes it hard to figure, but anywhere I read something like "requires little to no power" etc, does not compute with any animal style I ever learned. Actually all the leopard techniques I know are very hard strikes that target the orbital bones, side of the skill, and of course the Widowmaker floating rib strikes. I'll try to find some examples of that last one because it's a doozy and has some similarity with things like Chuka Shaolin, a personal fav of mine.
 
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CMyers0323

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Yes it’s not for people who don’t like exercise. I am lucky to have a few very serious students. They show up consistently and train hard. That has helped me stay true to the training and built a social group that has a certain expectation from new students. The lazy ones don’t last more than a couple of training sessions. It takes a very long time of being patient and doing the monotonous work.
Yeah I agree it's sad but it's better to weed out and only keep those who are actually serious. Good to hear you've had some I'm sure other instructors still probably are searching for those students who are willing to put in the effort. I've been lucky also to have a few that are serious. It's a great community when you find the right people. Haha yeah I've seen that but yes it does take a long time but it's appreciated and honestly more Interesting than getting it right away
 
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CMyers0323

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Worth noting a lot of info here doesn't add up...never read this page until today, but even the first picture of leopard fist is all wrong.

Hmm, might be worthwhile going through this later. Sometimes this stuff makes it way into the Wiki and nobody notices.

I've got better pics somewhere in my big zip drive.

I've read it a few times but I always thought the picture looked odd while I'm not an expert in the style it didn't look exactly safe to use that way I could be wrong though. That would be good hopefully more accurate info can help others also
 
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CMyers0323

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Sorry, metal from the Wu Xing pentagram, not Xing Yi (though yes, same five elements in Xing Yi, just different techniques).

In southern family styles the metal category represents cutting/splitting etc (like an axe), which is where the leopard splitting cup-fist comes in (and that first pic on the Wiki page aint it, that's someome who wants their fingers broken).

And yeah old manuals often have conflicting stuff that makes it hard to figure, but anywhere I read something like "requires little to no power" etc, does not compute with any animal style I ever learned. Actually all the leopard techniques I know are very hard strikes that target the orbital bones, side of the skill, and of course the Widowmaker floating rib strikes. I'll try to find some examples of that last one because it's a doozy and has some similarity with things like Chuka Shaolin, a personal fav of mine.
Oh I see I misread that. I see that's cool. I don't have any training in that but I always connected the metal and leopard as it made sense to me.

Ohh okay I see that makes sense and I guess it would then make sense in Xing Yi since metal is the splitting technique as well. I don't know of that leopard Technique but I am obviously familiar with Spliting from the Metal element in Xing Yi. Okay so it's more of a hammering or well splitting motion. I wasnt sure if it was done that way or more like a backfist based off that picture.

Yeah I've read a few and I'm able to peice some stuff together but other things I'm lost on haha. Yeah I see what your saying. I always have seen the animal styles as very powerful just in their own way as leopard and mantis would look different on how they put out power from what I learned. That's interesting for me it's similar while I don't know but maybe 4 or 5 it goes with the metal being a hard style and attacking similar targets. Now that sounds cool haha. I have a pdf of something with the same name but it's most likely something completely different. Yeah that would be great! These things are hard to find and I'm sure having it will keep the style more alive
 

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I've read it a few times but I always thought the picture looked odd while I'm not an expert in the style it didn't look exactly safe to use that way I could be wrong though. That would be good hopefully more accurate info can help others also
Chatting with my Hung Ga sifu right now about this. More to come.
 

Oily Dragon

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Oh I see I misread that. I see that's cool. I don't have any training in that but I always connected the metal and leopard as it made sense to me.

Ohh okay I see that makes sense and I guess it would then make sense in Xing Yi since metal is the splitting technique as well. I don't know of that leopard Technique but I am obviously familiar with Spliting from the Metal element in Xing Yi. Okay so it's more of a hammering or well splitting motion. I wasnt sure if it was done that way or more like a backfist based off that picture.

Yeah I've read a few and I'm able to peice some stuff together but other things I'm lost on haha. Yeah I see what your saying. I always have seen the animal styles as very powerful just in their own way as leopard and mantis would look different on how they put out power from what I learned. That's interesting for me it's similar while I don't know but maybe 4 or 5 it goes with the metal being a hard style and attacking similar targets. Now that sounds cool haha. I have a pdf of something with the same name but it's most likely something completely different. Yeah that would be great! These things are hard to find and I'm sure having it will keep the style more alive
Tiger and Leopard techniques are the ones most people associate with Chinese boxing and grappling. Fire and Metal elements. Hammering techniques, yes. But also core strength. Leopard is "external", and fast.

These are from a book published in 1964, "Shaolin Temple Boxing", that I have an old copy of.

And maybe somebody can check that last part, but it does look like leopards have much stronger legs/core muscles than tigers or other big cats.

I recently started getting back into the Ng Ying Kuen, Five Animal Fist, so this is a cool topic.

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Oily Dragon

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This is the Wiki image close up. There's no structure to this. It might not result in broken fingers.

Not to mention, this person has very little muscle mass.

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This is a leopard fist, thumb pressing in the other digits to form a nice compact fist, perfect for digging strikes into someone's abdomen or face.

1664836540184.png
 

Kung Fu Wang

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I'm surprised there's no subset of a style that focuses primarily on leopard,
Both tiger and leopard are similar kind of animal. They will turn their head before turing their body.

In MA, if you always move your head before you move your body, you are applying the tiger/leopard body method. Also when you attack your opponent, if you always jump up from your leading leg and then landing on your back leg, you are using tiger/leapord footwork.

The long fist system uses both the tiger/leopard body method and footwork.
 
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CMyers0323

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Tiger and Leopard techniques are the ones most people associate with Chinese boxing and grappling. Fire and Metal elements. Hammering techniques, yes. But also core strength. Leopard is "external", and fast.

These are from a book published in 1964, "Shaolin Temple Boxing", that I have an old copy of.

And maybe somebody can check that last part, but it does look like leopards have much stronger legs/core muscles than tigers or other big cats.

I recently started getting back into the Ng Ying Kuen, Five Animal Fist, so this is a cool topic.

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View attachment 29013
That's interesting! Personally I more so associated the monkey with grappling but I have found some really good grappling exercises mainly in the tiger. Yea I agree there. For the Tiger I've also always been told it's the most of pure power compared to the others but it's good to see otherwise as well.

I don't think I've heard of it but based off that picture it looks very interesting. It's hard to find some good books on these subjects. As much as I love the philosophy most of the books don't contain the training done.


That's cool your getting back into it but I do agree this is a cool topic
 
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CMyers0323

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This is the Wiki image close up. There's no structure to this. It might not result in broken fingers.

Not to mention, this person has very little muscle mass.

View attachment 29014

This is a leopard fist, thumb pressing in the other digits to form a nice compact fist, perfect for digging strikes into someone's abdomen or face.

View attachment 29015
I definitely like the second picture more the top one just looks like you'd hurt yourself haha. Gotta love the animal styles for the brutality that's one thing I've been told they have alot of
 
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CMyers0323

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Both tiger and leopard are similar kind of animal. They will turn their head before turing their body.

In MA, if you always move your head before you move your body, you are applying the tiger/leopard body method. Also when you attack your opponent, if you always jump up from your leading leg and then landing on your back leg, you are using tiger/leapord footwork.

The long fist system uses both the tiger/leopard body method and footwork.
It's cool you mention that. One of my instructors who taught me some Monkey Kung Fu mentioned keeping the head and body in line and they move as one. I always thought it was weird since moving just your eyes or head would be more effective but seeing this I can see why it's done.

Would you happen to know the other animal body and footwork methods? I've played with Foot work alot but I always enjoy different kinds I have a book that trains some of the "stepping methods"
 
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CMyers0323

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I figured I'll add what I can from the books I do have. Just a bit of info and some self defense
Here's the book if you want a copy.
 

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Oily Dragon

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I figured I'll add what I can from the books I do have. Just a bit of info and some self defense
Here's the book if you want a copy.
Bucksam Kong's Leopard training is legit.

But see this? Even in great books by total masters, they sometimes skip little details.

See the error? And I only say this with the greatest respect for Master Kong, I just know that sometimes especially when posing for the camera, anyone can make mistakes.

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Oily Dragon

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These are definitely Leopard technique.

That's definitely NOT a "straight right" though in the top picture though in Master's Kong's book.. Ah well, sometimes people take creative license in these books.

Middle picture, yes, Leopard style is very agile with its footwork. All over the place, like a dancer with strong legs. Lots of jumping, and the ability to suddenly be falling but find your footing.

Bottom one, a technique I actually sort of pulled off in a friendly competition once. This is called a "Through the sleeve" technique, and there it is again, the infamous floating rib. It's similar to this one (F), though this older illustration from the 60's shows a more proper guarding of the head by the non-striking hand (something Master Kong is skipping in his photo, because he's actually using his free hand to grab the oppoents other lead wrist, pulling him into the strike).

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Ow.

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JowGaWolf

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This is my biggest issue with CMA videos, it’s usually just flowery hands and no basics foundations.
I was talking to my sparring partner last week about the exact same thing.

Much of what CMA shows is from demo and not application and that causes problems because important things are often left out. Like the set up or what the non striking hand isn't doing.
 
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Oily Dragon

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I was talking to my sparring partner last week about the exact same thing.

Much of what CMA shows is from demo and not application and that causes problems because important things are often left out. Like the set up or what the non striking hand isn't doing.
It depends on where you look.

 
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