JTR Jujutsu

wab25

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My concern was that such formalized techniques should be designed to teach the most important underlying principles which make it possible for the "street application" to actually work. You can simplify the context, remove complicating factors, standardize the energy your training partner feeds you - but the fundamental concepts should be there from the beginning. Things like kuzushi, leverage, disrupting your opponent's structure while maintaining your own, relative body positioning, using the opponent's energy, and so on.
We do many of the same or similar locks in Danzan Ryu. However, there is a way to do these locks, while doing the things that Tony talks about. I would like to say that if you look at youtube for Danzan Ryu people doing their version, that you will see the difference... but, most of our videos will show the same errors and flaws that Tony mentioned.

However, the right instructors in our art, do demonstrate the things that Tony is talking about. (I am hoping and trying to teach my guys in this way... though I still need more work here...)

One of the issues that causes these flaws to show up is that students often think that the lock is the most important part, because thats where uke taps out in the demo or in the kata. But the lock and submission, is not the most important thing in these kata... its the entrance, the kuzushi, destroying uke's structure, taking his balance, getting off line, maintaining your own structure... If you get these parts right, the locks become a lot easier to get in the demo and kata practice. More importantly, you will get better at these parts for actual combat. The locks are difficult to get in full resistance situations... however, maintaining your own structure, taking their balance, destroying their structure, getting off line, using their energy... these things can be done, though they may not lead to a nice neat submission, as they do in kata.

I have found that the way to correct these issues is to go slow. As tori, you should never be off balance, in bad structure or over extending. Uke's balance and structure should be the first things to be taken and broken... from the first instant that contact is made. Once contact is made, balance is taken and structure destroyed... uke is never allowed to regain structure, balance or position.
 

Nettlesome

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Hi Nettlesome! Welcome to MartialTalk and I hope you stick around and join in some of the conversations.

And thank you for reacting graciously to critique from a bunch of random internet weirdos that you don't know.

That said, as the person who probably offered the longest list of criticisms way back when, I'll note that I do understand the difference between a formalized technique practiced with a cooperative partner for instructional purposes and the street application of said technique. My concern was that such formalized techniques should be designed to teach the most important underlying principles which make it possible for the "street application" to actually work. You can simplify the context, remove complicating factors, standardize the energy your training partner feeds you - but the fundamental concepts should be there from the beginning. Things like kuzushi, leverage, disrupting your opponent's structure while maintaining your own, relative body positioning, using the opponent's energy, and so on. The techniques as you demonstrated them seemed to be focused just on the final position of the various locks, which you achieved by just grabbing a rag-doll limp opponent and moving him wherever you wanted. From a pedagogical standpoint, I don't think that's very helpful to either beginners or advanced students.
What a nice welcome, thank you!

It seems like there's plenty of information here (and on JTR's official site) for others to draw their own conclusions, so I won't muddle things up with too much of my chatter. I would only add that Grand Master Kim was widely regarded by practitioners in the DC area (as well as in Japan and Korea) as 'the real thing.' I understand the dojo is producing a documentary on his too-short life and accomplishments, but don't know when it will be released.

I would also add that when it comes to pedagogy, JTR generally avoids the more philosophical aspects of martial arts; in other words, treating it like a spiritual practice. I'm fairly sure this isn't what you meant, but thought I'd mention it for those interested in JTR generally.
 

wab25

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It seems like there's plenty of information here (and on JTR's official site)
As an FYI, the website is currently down.

https://jtrjujutsu.com/ gives the following:
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