I am starting to learn Kungfu

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I just had a hazy doubt in my mind, does Lung Ying and Lung Ying Kuen are the same thing. Since southern dragon style mostly uses punches so i am confused like hell.
 
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One more thing I wanted to know is dragon style an independent style or it's a part of 5 animal kungfu style
And
Do i have to do any other basic trainings before starting dragon kungfu
 

Teapot

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This guy is very good:


What made you want to pick Southern Dragon?

Was there a video or something that inspired you?

I saw your post mentioning that everyone around you just picks Taekwondo, so I can sympathize with the notion of wanting to try something rare that no one else does.

I've felt that way about sports and musical instruments. If an Asian learned piano or violin... even if they become extremely good... they are just one of many Asians who are good at piano or violin. It doesn't make them stand out at all.
 
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They are the same.
Many styles have a dragon form, 樴 is Dragon or in Mandarin pronounces L籀ng
Xingyiquan has 樴 L籀ngqu獺n, Dragon fist
That's the exact answer I was looking. Thank you very much

I found a book on Lung Ying Kuen or Dragon boxing though was in Chinese script I might have to use a translator.
 
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This guy is very good:


What made you want to pick Southern Dragon?

Was there a video or something that inspired you?

I saw your post mentioning that everyone around you just picks Taekwondo, so I can sympathize with the notion of wanting to try something rare that no one else does.

I've felt that way about sports and musical instruments. If an Asian learned piano or violin... even if they become extremely good... they are just one of many Asians who are good at piano or violin. It doesn't make them stand out at all.
Initially I wanted to learn just martials art while I was scrolling for which one I should go I was given a suggestion to not to go for "shell" or just hollow moments and began going through mottos like for all arts I was enchanted by it's philosophy and it's motto "Ride the Wind". While i was searching more of it I came to knew it was a RARE style which compelled me more and i felt more attached to it. Then I came across a youtube video showing sparring between some people I was literally Dumbfounded by watching Southern dragon moves. He just smoothly deflects his opponent and forces him to ground and I was like this is way better than just to learn how to kick in different ways(Taekwondo).
 

JowGaWolf

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Initially I wanted to learn just martials art while I was scrolling for which one I should go I was given a suggestion to not to go for "shell" or just hollow moments and began going through mottos like for all arts I was enchanted by it's philosophy and it's motto "Ride the Wind". While i was searching more of it I came to knew it was a RARE style which compelled me more and i felt more attached to it. Then I came across a youtube video showing sparring between some people I was literally Dumbfounded by watching Southern dragon moves. He just smoothly deflects his opponent and forces him to ground and I was like this is way better than just to learn how to kick in different ways(Taekwondo).
You may want to talk to people who can actually use kung fu so you can get a more realistic perspective of what it's really like.
 

JowGaWolf

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But I can't find anyone,

Can I find someone here if yes then please tell how
Have you asked?

Ask so that others can add their input. From my experience, "smooth" is what it may look on the outside but from the perspective of the person that is fighting, "smoothly" is not something I'm thinking of. I'm either focused and landing a technique or not getting hit. Before fighting there's training and there's a lot of failures before you'll be successful. Lots of bruises and awkwardness. You'll eat a lot of punches and get kicked a lot.

If you go in with the focus of trying to be smooth like what you saw then, you'll end up learning nothing.

As for dragon forms. Like everything else dragon techniques don't work well by themselves. You aren't just going to dominate someone with one Kung Fu animal style. If you want to learn dragon, then your Kung Fu learning is going to be short. The last person that I met that felt like you do about what you saw ended up with the nickname "Hollywoood" because that's how her kung fu looked and it was the main reason why she has such a difficult and disappointing experience with trying to learn how to actually use kung fu. If you want to learn how to use kung fu then everything that you use will use will need to be practical.

It's also not as cool looking. I would be interested in seeing the sparring video that impressed you so much. At this point it sounds as if it's more of a demo than actual sparring.

Also do some reading about the characteristics of dragon techniques. This will help you to better understand what to look for in kung fu systems that may use it.
 

JowGaWolf

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For anyone who knows how to use Kung Fu. Please share your experience with learning kung fu. what should someone expect when using it and learning it.

What were / are some of the challenges you deal with.
 

Teapot

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I went down an old-school path in learning a Chinese martial art which was to Baishi under a teacher with a lineage, becoming accepted as a disciple.

You can learn more about Baishi here:

The quitting rate is very high. Most people quit on either their first day or first month. The class size is therefore very small and the duration of the class is very long - 4-5 hours.

There have been plenty of passionate students who were awestruck by how legit it is, but it became too legit for them to handle. That's the irony. Everyone wants to learn something "authentic" and "traditional", but when it's presented to them on a silver platter, they're both awestruck and traumatized. People generally want to learn what's easy and simple.

The practice is very painful. You may have heard of students trying to hold a "horse stance" for a very long time, but in this line, the pain in the legs is much worse because you can think of it as attempting a horse stance with almost all of your weight on one leg.

The Chinese saying, "Eat Bitter", is very applicable here.

There are no uniforms and no sashes/belts.

My experience is not at all representative of what it's like to learn a Chinese martial art because it depends on what style/lineage/school you are learning from.

For me, the experience is physical misery and disappointment, etc... It's an accelerated track of cultivating skills over most other schools, but it's demoralizing.

Having heard stories of other individuals, it does seem that legitimacy correlates to quitting rate and difficulty.
 

Hot Lunch

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I went down an old-school path in learning a Chinese martial art which was to Baishi under a teacher with a lineage, becoming accepted as a disciple.

You can learn more about Baishi here:

The quitting rate is very high. Most people quit on either their first day or first month. The class size is therefore very small and the duration of the class is very long - 4-5 hours.

There have been plenty of passionate students who were awestruck by how legit it is, but it became too legit for them to handle. That's the irony. Everyone wants to learn something "authentic" and "traditional", but when it's presented to them on a silver platter, they're both awestruck and traumatized. People generally want to learn what's easy and simple.

The practice is very painful. You may have heard of students trying to hold a "horse stance" for a very long time, but in this line, the pain in the legs is much worse because you can think of it as attempting a horse stance with almost all of your weight on one leg.

The Chinese saying, "Eat Bitter", is very applicable here.

There are no uniforms and no sashes/belts.

My experience is not at all representative of what it's like to learn a Chinese martial art because it depends on what style/lineage/school you are learning from.

For me, the experience is physical misery and disappointment, etc... It's an accelerated track of cultivating skills over most other schools, but it's demoralizing.

Having heard stories of other individuals, it does seem that legitimacy correlates to quitting rate and difficulty.
I don't mind hard training, as long as I'm getting something tangible out of it (i.e., I want to be spared the BS of "it builds character.")
 

JowGaWolf

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There have been plenty of passionate students who were awestruck by how legit it is, but it became too legit for them to handle. That's the irony. Everyone wants to learn something "authentic" and "traditional", but when it's presented to them on a silver platter, they're both awestruck and traumatized. People generally want to learn what's easy and simple.
I've seen this as well. If people just want to do forms then it's going to be easy. If people want the full plate then it's going to be a daily exercise in "digging deep and pushing through various types of pain and mental challenges." Yo be honest zi think a lot of my success comes from me not comparing myself to other students as a way to guess where I should be in my development. Kung fu is all about my development so whatever speed I'm learning something is the right speed for me.

I used to tell students to learn to be comfortable with training by themselves. There's a lot of that.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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Suffering. Get used to liking it. Find a way to laugh at yourself. Shut off your inner dialogue and submit fully to the training. Sometimes you may not understand why you are doing a thing for quite some time. People often quit because they dont get immediate results or immediate answers to their questions. Be patient, with your teacher, and yourself. Have the courage to be weak so that you can grow stronger. When you feel good, train. When you feel crummy, train. When you had a bad day, train. When you dont feel like it, train. Finally, eat healthy, sleep enough, drink water, and TRAIN.
 
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