Front Kick Training - Alan asked for it

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JowGaWolf

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Are those the bags that you complained that you punch deep into them? Yeh, those are the ones that I was complaining about. They are soft, I can see when you kick harder, it actually bent. We had the same kind in the gym too. Maybe they are good for boxing with gloves.
Correct, those are the bags that I complained about. They are soft and they sound good when the gloves land, but they are lighter than some of the bags I've hit in the past. But for most people at the gym those bags are really hard.
 
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JowGaWolf

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That video was taken in 1981, over 41 years ago.

I didn't know walking can cause hip problem as your wife's case. Thanks for sharing this information. Since I walk 3 miles every day, I may have to reduce that.

I ran 3 miles and also walked 3 miles yesterday. Running make me to feel young. My running desire is still too strong. I need to control that.
Bone density and joint health decreases with age. Most of the time it's because we are less active. Other times it's because joint wear and tear and genetics.

There are some treatments that use stem cells to repair joints but I don't know much about it.it may still be in the research phase. if would be a big medical accomplishment if they can be successful.
 
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JowGaWolf

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Getting good with front kicks: Start by kicking a static targets. It's rare that your target will be moving when you use these kicks. The kicks work best when you can land the kicks before your opponent moves or after they have finished moving. You can also use these kicks when the opponent doesn't move much. Throwing punch combos freezes you opponent's movement and gives you an easier target to hit.
 

Yokozuna514

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Getting good with front kicks: Start by kicking a static targets. It's rare that your target will be moving when you use these kicks. The kicks work best when you can land the kicks before your opponent moves or after they have finished moving. You can also use these kicks when the opponent doesn't move much. Throwing punch combos freezes you opponent's movement and gives you an easier target to hit.
Interesting kicking routine JowGaWolf. I like that you train various levels in progression. If you can do it slow, you can do it fast. Interesting to see you train kicks with shoes as well. I didn't realize gyms allowed you to use foot ware when kicking bags. Wearing foot ware can be a double edge sword as it can be cause as much damage to the kicker if the angle of the sole isn't square to the target than it can to protect the foot. I don't often train with shoes on as I rarely kick people outside the dojo but it is certainly another dimension to training.

Wearing shoes also changes the striking surface when doing front kicks just as your video demonstrated. I would be less prone to hit with the ball of my foot depending on the foot ware. Strangely enough, a few instructors at the dojo I am with were discussing the value of hitting with the heel and it sparked us to work on face kicks using the heel as we were already training outdoors because of covid.

We didn't train kicks to the chest or stomach with foot ware on as the risks far outweighed the benefits against a live opponent. Too easy to deflect or catch the kick especially if they are trained in any way. I would be interested in your thoughts in this regard. We train in different arts and I'm open to hearing another perspective.

The only comment I read that raised an eyebrow for me was, "It's rare that your target will be moving when you use these kicks." This has not been my experience against live opponents. I would think most people would move when they saw any kind of kick heading their way.

In any event, interesting to see one of your routines. Thanks for sharing.
 

Alan0354

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That video was taken in 1981, over 41 years ago.

I didn't know walking can cause hip problem as your wife's case. Thanks for sharing this information. Since I walk 3 miles every day, I may have to reduce that.

I ran 3 miles and also walked 3 miles yesterday. Running make me to feel young. My running desire is still too strong. I need to control that.
You don't have to stop, it makes a big different if you run on a treadmill, it cushion the impact, it's the hard ground concrete that likely causing the problem. Then you can ride stationary bike also......Hell, ride a real bike on the street. Anything is better than running on concrete, the WORST is the pavement ALWAYS slanted one way or the other. Don't you feel one side is higher than the other that you feel more on one leg. That imbalance really doesn't help your hip or knee.

For knee and other joints, there's always a way to strengthen it and get over it. Just the hip is something else, it just seems once you have problem, there's no return. The good news is you can really recover fast after replacement and go back to all the exercise( no stretching for high kick!!!) fast. My wife was walking around within a week already. It is almost out patient surgery. AND it is not painful from her experience both times.

I use kick boxing as my aerobics, I actually call my workout aerobics!!! It's really balance, whole body workout. I do 7 1/2 min rounds.
 
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JowGaWolf

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I didn't realize gyms allowed you to use foot ware when kicking bags.
I think it's only at this gym. When I first joined the floor had splintered wood and screws sticking up from the floor. As a result we kicked with shoes on. I sometimes take my shoes off but not often.

I train in shoes, but only in shoes with flat soles. Certain shoes have a higher risk for ankle injuries.


We didn't train kicks to the chest or stomach with foot ware on as the risks far outweighed the benefits against a live opponent. Too easy to deflect or catch the kick especially if they are trained in any way. I would be interested in your thoughts in this regard.
This is more of a timing issue and the high percentage front kicks to the chest are done as counters or kicks that follow a punch combo. I taught my brother the timing for using the kick as a counter and he told me that he has been very successful with the kick. He uses that same timing for his round house kicks with success.

But once you know the timing, you'll be able break ribs at will.


I would think most people would move when they saw any kind of kick heading their way.
Which is why the kick is done when your opponent is least able to respond to the kick. When you punch your opponent in the face, he should be puzzled at why his ribs hurt. If he or she sees thick, then there only possible reaction should be that saw it too late to brace for impact.

The better my control, the better my timing will be. The better my timing the more successful my kicks will be.
 

Alan0354

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Interesting kicking routine JowGaWolf. I like that you train various levels in progression. If you can do it slow, you can do it fast. Interesting to see you train kicks with shoes as well. I didn't realize gyms allowed you to use foot ware when kicking bags. Wearing foot ware can be a double edge sword as it can be cause as much damage to the kicker if the angle of the sole isn't square to the target than it can to protect the foot. I don't often train with shoes on as I rarely kick people outside the dojo but it is certainly another dimension to training.

Wearing shoes also changes the striking surface when doing front kicks just as your video demonstrated. I would be less prone to hit with the ball of my foot depending on the foot ware. Strangely enough, a few instructors at the dojo I am with were discussing the value of hitting with the heel and it sparked us to work on face kicks using the heel as we were already training outdoors because of covid.

We didn't train kicks to the chest or stomach with foot ware on as the risks far outweighed the benefits against a live opponent. Too easy to deflect or catch the kick especially if they are trained in any way. I would be interested in your thoughts in this regard. We train in different arts and I'm open to hearing another perspective.

The only comment I read that raised an eyebrow for me was, "It's rare that your target will be moving when you use these kicks." This has not been my experience against live opponents. I would think most people would move when they saw any kind of kick heading their way.

In any event, interesting to see one of your routines. Thanks for sharing.
I train bare footed, I wear sandals, I just assume I'll kick them off before the fight and kick bare footed.

I like the train with bag moving, it's harder to aim if the bag is moving. I even further make it harder to have two bags hanging so I punch and kick one, turn around and do it on the other one, then turn back to the first one. The point is when I go to the second bag, I lost track on how the first one swing. When I turn back to the first one, I would have to acquire the target fast to punch and kick. This is to train for quicker response time and train to be able to hit and different distance instead of the predictable distance.
 
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JowGaWolf

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I like the train with bag moving, it's harder to aim if the bag is moving. I even further make it harder to have two bags hanging so I punch and kick one, turn around and do it on the other one, then turn back to the first one
Don't make it more difficult than it needs to be. Start with the simple things. If you aren't accurate facing what is in front of you then kicking a bag that's behind won't improve you.
 

Yokozuna514

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I train bare footed, I wear sandals, I just assume I'll kick them off before the fight and kick bare footed.

I like the train with bag moving, it's harder to aim if the bag is moving. I even further make it harder to have two bags hanging so I punch and kick one, turn around and do it on the other one, then turn back to the first one. The point is when I go to the second bag, I lost track on how the first one swing. When I turn back to the first one, I would have to acquire the target fast to punch and kick. This is to train for quicker response time and train to be able to hit and different distance instead of the predictable distance.
I train bare footed most of the time because the art I do requires we do so. I don't expect I would do much fighting outside of the dojo. I don't frequent areas where I expect I would need to defend myself physically.

I appreciate what you are 'trying' to do but I would caution you on this method of training. The risk of injury to your wrists is far greater than the benefit, imho. Bags do move when they are hit and it takes practice and time to be proficient to hit a heavy bag that is moving. Adding a second bag that is swaying randomly increases the likelihood of hitting the bag at odd angles which can injure your wrists if you aren't careful. The art I do requires a focus on bare knuckling training so I have seen my fair share of wrist and hand injuries from improper methods.

Instead, I would practice on one bag and proper footwork to increase the likelihood of hitting the bag square. I am not an expert on fighting multiple opponents simultaneously but logically I wouldn't want to be between them for the most part. Good luck with your training. Train long and train smart. Osu !
 

Alan0354

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I train bare footed most of the time because the art I do requires we do so. I don't expect I would do much fighting outside of the dojo. I don't frequent areas where I expect I would need to defend myself physically.

I appreciate what you are 'trying' to do but I would caution you on this method of training. The risk of injury to your wrists is far greater than the benefit, imho. Bags do move when they are hit and it takes practice and time to be proficient to hit a heavy bag that is moving. Adding a second bag that is swaying randomly increases the likelihood of hitting the bag at odd angles which can injure your wrists if you aren't careful. The art I do requires a focus on bare knuckling training so I have seen my fair share of wrist and hand injuries from improper methods.

Instead, I would practice on one bag and proper footwork to increase the likelihood of hitting the bag square. I am not an expert on fighting multiple opponents simultaneously but logically I wouldn't want to be between them for the most part. Good luck with your training. Train long and train smart. Osu !
I guess I am not punching hard enough!!! I never have issue with my wrist all these years. I just posted my punching and kicking a week or so ago to get comment, please comment if you want. I am taking this week off, but I'll start practicing next week.

I also punching pole twice a week to condition my bones and knuckles for years:

If you have any suggestions, let me know.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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When I train on the heavy bag, or striking dummy, Sometime I like to punch and kick like a mad man until I get totally exhausted (about 70 punches).

Sometime I just like to coordinate my punch with my leading foot landing. I like to hear that "single explosive sound" when my foot land on the ground and my punch hit on the bag.
 
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