constant relocation and training

Drobison491

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So I've recently started training in Uechi-Ryu and feel like I've found my home. Unfortunately, I only have about a year left, before my job moves me again (typically only stay 2 years in any location). I'm not sure where I'll be moved to next, though I have a few ideas, none of the locations have a Uechi-Ryu school in the intimidate area, but most have a school within 2 hours. Right now my plan is to train on my own and only attend a class or two a month.

My question is, being so new at the style, would that be effective or would it be better to switch to a new style as I move around. I don't mind learning new things, but starting fresh every couple years seems like it would be a little demoralizing.
 

Danny T

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If its Okinawan karate no matter the name it will all be quite the same. Nuances will vary but overall it will be the same. Prior to the Japanese holding a large demonstration with the Okinawan masters showcasing their art there were no 'styles' it was just Karate or 'Te' and before that it was all called Toudi. Styles came about because of a demonstration held in 1927 where the Japanese requested several Okinawan masters to showcase their Karate. To advertise it they gave a name to each of the master's art or 'style'. Mostly based on where that master was from. These masters even stated there were no different styles just Te or Karate.
 
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Drobison491

Drobison491

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Pretty sure I remember reading that. It's really interesting history at least to me. So if i'm reading you correctly, it would seem that finding an Okinawan "style" school I can train in consistently would be better than traveling to an exact match school I can only get to once or twice a month.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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only stay 2 years in any location...
In 2 years, you should have developed some good foundation. For the rest of your life, you just need to develop your "bread and butter moves (or door guarding moves)". I don't think any school can help you on that. You have to do it all by yourself. Find some training partners. work on your partner drills, sparring, and wrestling.

What's "bread and butter moves"? For example, if

- reverse back punch is the only punch that you know, work on it until you can use it to knock down everybody on this planet.
- side kick is the only kick that you know, work on it until you can use it to knock down everybody on this planet.
- single leg is the only take down that you know, work on it until you can use it to take down everybody on this planet.
- ...
 
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Drobison491

Drobison491

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appreciate the input. The 10,000 hour concept
 

JR 137

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If its Okinawan karate no matter the name it will all be quite the same. Nuances will vary but overall it will be the same. Prior to the Japanese holding a large demonstration with the Okinawan masters showcasing their art there were no 'styles' it was just Karate or 'Te' and before that it was all called Toudi. Styles came about because of a demonstration held in 1927 where the Japanese requested several Okinawan masters to showcase their Karate. To advertise it they gave a name to each of the master's art or 'style'. Mostly based on where that master was from. These masters even stated there were no different styles just Te or Karate.
While a great point about Okinawan karate, it must be said that Uechi is quite different than the rest of Okinawan karate. Having a solid base in it will definitely help, but Uechi is pretty unorthodox compared to the others.

I really liked Uechi during the limited time I spent in it. I was away at college, found it my last year, and moved back home after graduating, resuming my Kyokushin offshoot full time.
 
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Drobison491

Drobison491

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it's pretty unique for sure (from my limited perspective). I struggle getting my elbows tucked in far enough, keeping my shoulders down, and having my elbow go straight back. I'm not a huge dude by any standards just need a lot more mobility work
 

Taipan

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So I've recently started training in Uechi-Ryu and feel like I've found my home. Unfortunately, I only have about a year left, before my job moves me again (typically only stay 2 years in any location). I'm not sure where I'll be moved to next, though I have a few ideas, none of the locations have a Uechi-Ryu school in the intimidate area, but most have a school within 2 hours. Right now my plan is to train on my own and only attend a class or two a month.

My question is, being so new at the style, would that be effective or would it be better to switch to a new style as I move around. I don't mind learning new things, but starting fresh every couple years seems like it would be a little demoralizing.

When you have no other option you can go with an online course and training partner. The GMAU sounds like it would work for uou. It is unorthodox to train online, but when it's the best option go with it! It is important to have a good base first though. I was/am in the same situation you are. You just have to make something work.
 

drop bear

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We get this argument at bit.

The problem is that people say that the argument is that doing two styles hampers their progression vs doing one style.

But that is not the argument.

In reality the argument is. Is doing two styles hampering your progression more than sitting on the couch.

Which is the excuse our strikers use to skip grappling classes.
 
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Drobison491

Drobison491

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We get this argument at bit.

The problem is that people say that the argument is that doing two styles hampers their progression vs doing one style.

But that is not the argument.

In reality the argument is. Is doing two styles hampering your progression more than sitting on the couch.

Which is the excuse our strikers use to skip grappling classes.


Great perspective, I can always pick up my current style again when I get back to an area with a good school. I guess initially I was to caught up in "what style" more than simply training.

Looks like I may be headed to Korea for a year, I seriously doubt there are Uechi Ryu schools there. Maybe I'll take this opportunity to explore some Korean styles.
 

Patience

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Find out if your school will do online classes. Many have had to do that this year and plan to continue. It's not optimal, but perhaps you can continue in your Uechi Ryu school while also finding local partners to practice with, even if they're from another style. You really can't learn karate without some level of partner work (just my humble opinion.) I've been in the same situation you're in many times, and at some point, if you want to progress and not start over again and again and again, you just have to figure out how to make it work, or quit your job and get one where you can stay local for 5 or 6 years or more.
 

drop bear

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Great perspective, I can always pick up my current style again when I get back to an area with a good school. I guess initially I was to caught up in "what style" more than simply training.

Looks like I may be headed to Korea for a year, I seriously doubt there are Uechi Ryu schools there. Maybe I'll take this opportunity to explore some Korean styles.

Yeah. Look. Do the style that the area is good at. Otherwise you are kind of wasting a resource. I wouldn't go to Thailand and learn karate. I wouldn't go to Japan and learn thai boxing.
 

WaterGal

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Yeah. Look. Do the style that the area is good at. Otherwise you are kind of wasting a resource. I wouldn't go to Thailand and learn karate. I wouldn't go to Japan and learn thai boxing.

I have heard that BJJ and boxing are quite popular in Japan, for whatever that's worth. And China is quite competitive in Taekwondo.
 

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