Can I get some conformation on a gym

BJJwannabe91

Yellow Belt
Joined
Aug 30, 2015
Messages
26
Reaction score
9
Hello, I live in Portland, Oregon but I work in Salem. Anyways, I was wondering if someone can help me because Iam new to the martial arts game lol and I don't want a mcdojo gym. The gyms name is Keizer martial arts and they teach a variety of stuff but I was wondering if there Muay Thai and submission wrestling is solid it's called kru Muay Thai and the head coach of it is chad white. Any info you can give me would be great
 

drop bear

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
20,487
Reaction score
5,397
Muay thai is easy to check. Find out if their fighters win fights. Like asking which football team is good.

Btw anybody can train in Thailand. Just sayin.
 

Tony Dismukes

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
5,892
Reaction score
4,460
Location
Lexington, KY
Looking at their website, I don't see any mention of a submission grappling program.

As far as the Muay Thai goes, it sounds like they are teaching it as a family martial art program rather than training a competitive fight team. There's nothing wrong with that, if that's what you're looking for. I don't have any first hand knowledge of the instructor, but he seems to have a respectable pedigree, and the video on the website shows good technique.
 

drop bear

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
20,487
Reaction score
5,397
Looking at their website, I don't see any mention of a submission grappling program.

As far as the Muay Thai goes, it sounds like they are teaching it as a family martial art program rather than training a competitive fight team. There's nothing wrong with that, if that's what you're looking for. I don't have any first hand knowledge of the instructor, but he seems to have a respectable pedigree, and the video on the website shows good technique.

Looks like he checks a bit weird. Almost with the side of his leg. Knees go up rather than forwards. Not big issues.
 
OP
B

BJJwannabe91

Yellow Belt
Joined
Aug 30, 2015
Messages
26
Reaction score
9
Ok, thank you to everyone that replied I appreciate it!
 
OP
B

BJJwannabe91

Yellow Belt
Joined
Aug 30, 2015
Messages
26
Reaction score
9
Looking at their website, I don't see any mention of a submission grappling program.

As far as the Muay Thai goes, it sounds like they are teaching it as a family martial art program rather than training a competitive fight team. There's nothing wrong with that, if that's what you're looking for. I don't have any first hand knowledge of the instructor, but he seems to have a respectable pedigree, and the video on the website shows good technique.
You'd have to check their other gym it's silverton self defense they have two gyms and ones in silverton, like 15 minutes away, that's where the submission wrestling is I thought it was listed on their one site but I guess they have two. So as far as learning good technique to where if I had to defend myself I'd be fine, correct?
 

Tony Dismukes

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
5,892
Reaction score
4,460
Location
Lexington, KY
You'd have to check their other gym it's silverton self defense they have two gyms and ones in silverton, like 15 minutes away, that's where the submission wrestling is I thought it was listed on their one site but I guess they have two. So as far as learning good technique to where if I had to defend myself I'd be fine, correct?
The Silverton website doesn't have any information about their submission wrestling program. (The page says "coming soon.") If you can find out who teaches that program, we might be able to track down some info on them.

The Muay Thai program will probably teach you respectable technique for stand up fighting. (Fighting is different from self-defense, although there can be some overlaps.)
 
OP
B

BJJwannabe91

Yellow Belt
Joined
Aug 30, 2015
Messages
26
Reaction score
9
The Silverton website doesn't have any information about their submission wrestling program. (The page says "coming soon.") If you can find out who teaches that program, we might be able to track down some info on them.

The Muay Thai program will probably teach you respectable technique for stand up fighting. (Fighting is different from self-defense, although there can be some overlaps.)
Okay, I'll call them today and get back to you on to see who teaches the submission wrestling. What's the difference between fighting and self defense? Basically, my goal is to be a well rounded fighter I want to learn stand up for self defense I would also like to learn grappling in case a fight would go to the ground but I want to compete in grappling tournaments also. I don't want to compete in striking matches but I'd like to be taught at a high level in case my mind changes. What route would you say I take?
 
OP
B

BJJwannabe91

Yellow Belt
Joined
Aug 30, 2015
Messages
26
Reaction score
9
Muay thai is easy to check. Find out if their fighters win fights. Like asking which football team is good.

Btw anybody can train in Thailand. Just sayin.
Yeah...that would be nice to go to Thailand and train but my pockets ain't that deep.
 

Tony Dismukes

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
5,892
Reaction score
4,460
Location
Lexington, KY
What's the difference between fighting and self defense?

I'll save myself some typing and quote myself from an earlier thread:

Fighting - covers any situation where two or more people are trying to violently defeat each other. This can occur in a sportive or a street context. The combatants may be armed or unarmed. They may be operating under different sets of rules (even in a non-sportive context). Just a few examples of a fight might be: a MMA bout between two pro fighters, three cops subduing a resisting suspect, a pair of drunks squaring up outside a bar over some verbal offense. Many, many more situations are possible. These different contexts significantly affect what tactics, principles, and techniques are most effective in winning the fight. Nevertheless, there is significant overlap in what works as well.

Not all violent situations are fights. A canny asocial predator will attempt to use surprise, intimidation, or overwhelming force to ensure that there is no fight - that all the violence is directed towards his victim with no resistance.

Most fights are not self-defense, but some are. (None of the examples I listed above would qualify.)

Self-defense - covers the necessary actions and skills to get home at the end of the day unharmed by violence, without any unscheduled stops along the way at the hospital or prison. Some of the relevant factors here include lifestyle, awareness, attitude, de-escalation skills, evasion skills, and understanding of how different types of violence begin.

Most of self-defense does not involve fighting. Sometimes it does, but usually that is an indication that you have either screwed up the other important aspects of self-defense or else gotten really unlucky. If you get into fights on any sort of regular basis and it's not part of your job, you should strongly consider the possibility that you are not just unlucky.

Based on these definitions, fighting and self-defense can be seen as separate circles in a Venn diagram with about 5% of overlap.

Martial arts: For some reason many people like to bring up the derivation of "martial" as evidence that martial arts have something to do with the arts of war. Regardless of the etymology, the overwhelming majority of martial arts have nothing at all to do with war-fighting.

Given the diversity of the martial arts, the best definition I can muster is "a formalized system in a certain historical context for training certain skills, attributes, or techniques in some way related to or derived from methods of violence." This can cover a lot of ground, for example:
  • an acrobatic performance art with stylized movements derived from old fighting techniques
  • an historical recreation of medieval swordfighting methods
  • a system for cultivating certain spiritual or mental attributes through the practice of physical techniques
  • a system for unarmed fighting in a civilian context
  • and many, many more.

Chris would probably insist that a martial art has a unifying set of principles that tie together its various techniques and training methods. I think it might be overstating the case to say that this is always true. I've seen plenty of martial arts where the principles don't really seem that unified.

Once you understand the nature of fighting, of self-defense, and of a given martial art, then you are in a better place to evaluate how your martial arts training may affect your ability to defend yourself or to win a fight in a given context. Bear in mind that defending yourself and winning a fight are not the same thing. For example, if your training encourages your aggressive nature, then it may help you win a fight. If your training helps you stay calm, it may help you walk away from a fight, which is a much higher form of self-defense.
 
OP
B

BJJwannabe91

Yellow Belt
Joined
Aug 30, 2015
Messages
26
Reaction score
9
The Silverton website doesn't have any information about their submission wrestling program. (The page says "coming soon.") If you can find out who teaches that program, we might be able to track down some info on them.

The Muay Thai program will probably teach you respectable technique for stand up fighting. (Fighting is different from self-defense, although there can be some overlaps.)
The lady told me a guy named Dave Hagen is the one who mainly teaches the submission wrestling
 
OP
B

BJJwannabe91

Yellow Belt
Joined
Aug 30, 2015
Messages
26
Reaction score
9
I'm not familiar with him, but I checked out his YouTube channel and his instruction appears to be competent.
Do you think his teaching could take some one far? I know it depends on the person of course but I'm athletic and physically strong so I think I have potential given the right instructor.
 

drop bear

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
20,487
Reaction score
5,397
Do you think his teaching could take some one far? I know it depends on the person of course but I'm athletic and physically strong so I think I have potential given the right instructor.

Then go to a fight gym. Plain and simple. Someone who has a track record of training good fighters.
 

Andrew Green

Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Aug 1, 2004
Messages
8,628
Reaction score
447
Location
Winnipeg MB
Do you think his teaching could take some one far? I know it depends on the person of course but I'm athletic and physically strong so I think I have potential given the right instructor.

Going far is a funny concept, do you want to learn technique in depth, get in a ring and fight your way up the ranks or both?
 

Tony Dismukes

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
5,892
Reaction score
4,460
Location
Lexington, KY
Do you think his teaching could take some one far? I know it depends on the person of course but I'm athletic and physically strong so I think I have potential given the right instructor.
Depends on what you mean by "take someone far." If you are new to martial arts, they should have plenty to keep you learning for quite some time.
 
Top