WWII story of Robert Capa, the last soldier to die

Discussion in 'Photography' started by oftheherd1, Sep 1, 2016.

  1. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    The below link is to a site that shows some of the photos Capa took in two wars, especially WWII. Fascinatingly there is also a recording of an interview of Capa. Hope all, but especially those who are interested in photography, enjoy.

    Leipzig flat made famous in Capa war photo becomes poignant memorial
     
  2. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    Just one thing though, the Second World War didn't end until 15th August 1945 when Japan surrendered. Many more died before the surrender.
     
  3. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    That is correct, but in Germany it was in May, and that is where Capa was. I guess England also differentiates between VE and VJ day as we do. One of my earliest memories is one day my father listening to the radio in the dining room and getting all excited. I asked him what was going on and he said the war was over. I guess I was to young to know too much about it, so I don't recall if it was VE or VJ day. Either was welcomed in the USA, and cause for celebration.

    I also remember one time asking what a war was. I was very young probably only 3 or4 years old so how do you explain to a 3 or 4 year old what war is? I was told it was when men lined up and shot and killed each other. I remember being quite nonplussed about that. In my mind's eye, I envisioned two opposing lines of men with guns, and the first in each line shooting at the other. It made no sense to be why men would stand up like that and shoot each other. Why did the following men in the lines just stand there and wait for their turn to shoot and be shot. Ah, the mind of a child. :)
     
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  4. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    We do recognise that VE and VJ are at different times but we had so many men, women and children who had been Japanese POWs that the war in the Far East has a lot of emotional meaning for many. The prisoners had been badly treated and many died, not just fighting men but many civilians including children.
    My father was in the army, not long back from the Korean war when I was born, then he went off to the Suez, Kenya and Cyprus actions Later there was Aden. In the seventies we had the Dhofar rebellion, another Cyprus war, Northern Ireland and the Falklands all of which my husband was in. After that was the First Gulf war, and Bosnia then Kosovo. Sierra Leone then Afghanistan ( the UK's fourth war there) Iraq and Libya. War has never been a stranger I'm afraid.
     
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  5. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    Didn't England have some troops in Vietnam. I don't specifically recall. I know there were Australian and New Zealand troops there. New Zealand had a lot of medical personnel there, mostly out amongst the civilian population. They treated anyone who showed up at their gate. The Australians had an airborne unit there for a while, attached to the 173rd Airborne Brigate (Sep).
     
  6. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    No the UK didn't have offiical troops there, we didn't join that war as such but didn't exactly stay out of it. Britain, Vietnam and the Special Relationship | History Today
     
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  7. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    Thanks for the link. A very interesting read having spent some time in Asia and especially Vietnam. Some things are reported as fact these days, that for those of us who lived at that time don't agree with our experiences or those reported by our colleagues at the time.
     
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  8. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    That was a great read, a great watch.

    My dad fought on the front lines of World War One. I can't imagine what anybody, in any war, went through.
     
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  9. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I had an uncle who was a litter bearer in World War I. Just like medics today, that could be dicey since you were there to recover wounded, not seek cover until things calmed down.

    Salute to your dad!
     
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