Wing chun footwork

Discussion in 'Wing Chun' started by callMeHawkEye, Feb 26, 2018.

  1. callMeHawkEye

    callMeHawkEye White Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    So how exactly does wing chun footwork work? Is there any footwork really in wing chun? Most of it seems like just the arms. How do you move and close the gap or make room in wing chun?

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. wckf92

    wckf92 Master Black Belt

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,138
    Likes Received:
    273
    Trophy Points:
    123
    We move forward to close gaps. We make room to move forward by striking the bad guy :D
     
  3. Martial D

    Martial D Senior Master

    Joined:
    May 18, 2017
    Messages:
    2,451
    Likes Received:
    755
    Trophy Points:
    213
    There are actually many different answers to that.

    The way I was taught was a combination of shifting, triangle stepping and pull stepping(where you pull your rear planted mass with your forward foot.

    Some, like the cheungers, like to hop in to bridge with the front leg in the check position.

    Some say footwork doesn't matter at all as long as you keep a hold of the centerline.

    I tend to prefer kickstand footwork these days(always one heel planted and one heel up) but it isn't in any traditional WC syllabus.
     
  4. callMeHawkEye

    callMeHawkEye White Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Sounds like Bruce Lee bai zhong stance with the raised rear heel

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  5. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2012
    Messages:
    7,112
    Likes Received:
    1,761
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Austin, Tx/Shell Beach, Ca
    In Chinese wrestling, you can train footwork in the following way:

    1. Mark L1, R1, L2, R2 on the ground.
    2. Put left foot on L1 and right foot on R1.
    3. Move L1 to L2 and move R1 to R2 (advance).
    4. Move L2 back to L1 and move R2 back to R1 (retreat).
    5. Repeat 3 and 4.

    Sometime you combine step 3 or step 4 as 1 step. Instead of moving 2 feet separately, you may just use 1 single "hop". I believe this training method can be applied to all MA systems.
     
  6. Martial D

    Martial D Senior Master

    Joined:
    May 18, 2017
    Messages:
    2,451
    Likes Received:
    755
    Trophy Points:
    213
    Sort of, but it's not always the rear heel, and applies also to (transitional) lateral stance and movement.

    The tpbk stance is a different animal altogether.
     
  7. geezer

    geezer Grandmaster

    • MartialTalk Mentor
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2007
    Messages:
    5,865
    Likes Received:
    2,089
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Any real footwork? Jeez, from my perspective that's a very odd question. In our lineage we train footwork intensively. I know that different lineages differ on this, but wow!

    What do they teach where you train?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. callMeHawkEye

    callMeHawkEye White Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I don't mean any offense by it. Geezer. I am currently training under yuan kay shan lineage but am still only beginner. I am not really sure about the foot work in wing chun and that is why I ask the op questions. There definitely is a lot of stance work though - Zhang Zuang

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. geezer

    geezer Grandmaster

    • MartialTalk Mentor
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2007
    Messages:
    5,865
    Likes Received:
    2,089
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    I don't know, I'm betting that YKS WC has pretty strong footwork training. And it's probably pretty different from what I learned in WT. There's gotta be somebody on this forum who can weigh in! I'll sit back and wait.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2005
    Messages:
    11,355
    Likes Received:
    1,834
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Have you asked your instructor about it? That seems like the most direct way to get a relevant answer.
     
  11. Vajramusti

    Vajramusti Master Black Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Messages:
    1,283
    Likes Received:
    312
    Trophy Points:
    123
    --------------------------------------
    In Ho Kam Ming and Fong's classes there is lots of footwork.
     
  12. Ojibway Bob

    Ojibway Bob White Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2018
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Hi there OP. I see you are new just as I am. I have only been doing WC for 3 weeks now and we are starting to do basic shifting. I asked about footwork a week in and was told that for pretty much my first 3 months, I would be mostly in the dreaded stance.

    One of the senior members told me they want me to be rooted, learn proper technique to drive power from the ground up so the stance is important.

    I do see other members moving around in a bit of a shuffle, short quick slip steps it looks like. So I say hang tight and you will learn the footwork. We have to crawl before we walk lol.

    I do not want to get into the lineage wars because I really do not know how to find out what my WC is. When ever I ask they mention it is direct from Ip Man. They then always point to a picture hanging up on the wall with our Sifu, Bruce Lee, And Ip Man sitting along with a few other people.

    I find the class so weird because it is so informal. When I was young I went to Karate classes and there it was so strict. I remember having the Sensei kick out our feet to see if we were properly standing or rapping our knuckles with bamboo to train our fists in the right position. But my WC is so much more laxed, very social, everyone is treated like a Brother or Sister. It does get serious when it has too. One of the masters, (no one likes to be called Master there lol) was showing me how to properly do Tan da. A week later my forearms are still bruised from forcing his punches out of my center hahah.

    Anyways I always look forward to reading new posts and look forward at looking at more.

    Take care all.
     
  13. APL76

    APL76 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2017
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Canberra
    Hi callMeHawkEye. My sifu was a disciple of Sum Nung and I have trained and taught in Yeun Kay San wing chun for many years and I can assure you that not only is there plenty of footwork, but it is an absolutely integral part of the ability to apply wing chun (by our standards at least).


    Having said that though, you must do an enormous amount of stance training to get yourself ready for it; otherwise, it will be slow, unstable, flimsy and ineffectual. So if you are a beginner, and your sifu has you doing almost nothing but stance training, then that sounds about right to me. You can probably expect to be doing almost nothing but jun ma (turning stance) training for a good while too before you get to the actual footwork (stepping and so on) which you will develop as you learn the sup yi sik.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

    Joined:
    May 11, 2017
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    45
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I only ever took one class of Wan Kam Leung lineage Wing Chun. I don't think it was any kind of separate beginner class, but nevertheless I was made to do basic stepping patterns already then. I wasn't taught any kind of body shifting or turning stance as far as I can remember.

    I wholeheartedly disagree with APL76 in regards to stance training. I think it's important to get yourself moving with footwork, even sparring from the day one. Even if it sucks and is unstable and ineffective, then hey, it's your first class anyway. In a month or two it's already waaay better than day one.
     
  15. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2002
    Messages:
    3,743
    Likes Received:
    1,894
    Trophy Points:
    388
    Location:
    New Iberia, Louisiana USA
    Shift your center of gravity to one foot or the other step forward, to the side, or backward and shift your center of gravity to that foot or center it on both. It is very similar to walking.

    There is a lot of footwork in the wing chun I have been exposed to. When and how it is trained will vary from instructor to instructor. I have students doing specific stance and footwork practice from day one. I know of others who only do specific static stance practice for a few months. In time you will do a lot of stance and footwork if you stay with the training.
     
  16. APL76

    APL76 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2017
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Canberra

    Fair enough, but all I'm saying is that if he is doing Yuen Kay San Wing Chun, assuming he is being taught properly, the way Sum Nung taught it, it would be completely possible and even expectable for him to literally do nothing but Yi Ji Kim Yeung Ma every day and be able to hold it for around two hours before he learned the next thing (which would be single centreline punches). When I learned the traditional way I did nothing but YJKYM for around 4 months. Its just how that style of wing chun is taught (if you do it the way Sum Nung did it).

    Most people don't do that kind of training, that's completely understandable; it is grueling and takes some serious amount of time and dedication. I have done it and I can assure you that the difference between that and "moving with footwork, even sparring from the day one." is monumental. The quality, strength, speed and power that one achieves through that kind of training is in another universe compared learning it piecemeal from day one. You can disagree whole heartedly but unless you have done that kind of training, and know YKS wing chun, you are not really in a position to know anything about it.

    What I would say to callMeHawkEye is that you should ask your sifu these questions, and if your sifu is expecting you to do a lot of stance training and not a great deal of anything else I would guess he is training your properly for YKS wing chun. Can I ask you who you are learning from and where you train?
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. callMeHawkEye

    callMeHawkEye White Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Thanks guys. I will try to ask my teacher tonight if I can make it to class or on Saturday. In my school we cover some basic drills like 3 star punch and pak gam tan drill and punching and stance work. We did do some basic shifting. And I notice it is in some ways similar to taiji. (I used to do taiji years ago)


    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
     
  18. callMeHawkEye

    callMeHawkEye White Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I am learning from sifu Anton Miller

    Kwok Wan-Ping -> Chun Ming Lee ->
    Alton Miller

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. APL76

    APL76 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2017
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Canberra

    OK, I know of him and have seen some of his stuff, he seems much better than most. Kwak Wan Pin actually did quite a bit of tai chi, and according to one of my friends who goes and visits him, he is only doing tai chi these days. Could be that he added it to his wing chun.

    My advice would be to do heaps of stance training, and then heaps of jun ma. It will make doing sup yi sik much easier, and better quality. If sup yi sik is good you will have good wing chun.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  20. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2012
    Messages:
    7,112
    Likes Received:
    1,761
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Austin, Tx/Shell Beach, Ca
    I don't believe WC trains footwork as much as some other CMA styles such as the XingYi, Bagua, or long fist. The long fist 3rd road Pao Quan sometime requires 1/2 basket ball field to train.





     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2018

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

yiu chao wing chun