What is the "Do" in your art? What did the Founder of it intend it to be?

Discussion in 'Philosophy and Spirituality in the Arts' started by Makalakumu, Sep 20, 2014.

  1. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    I've been thinking about this question for a long time, what does the "do" in your art supposed to mean? What did the founder intend it to be? I know a lot of you train in arts with out the "do" in it's name, but if you train in a do-jo perhaps you still have a concept that is similar to the concept of Do in other arts. If so, what is it? And finally, for those of you who do not use the concept, perhaps you have an overarching philosophy that your art is meant to transmit. Perhaps you could share that.

    I've been doing a lot of thinking about this lately and I wonder what the similarities and differences among people's perceptions of the Do and what the Founder intended. I also wonder what the similarities and differences are between the various martial arts that use that concept.
     
  2. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    Personally, I've trained in the following arts that have used Do as part it's name or have practiced in a Do-jo.

    Shotokan Karate
    Tang Soo Do Moo Do Kwan
    Dan Zan Ryu Jujutsu
    Judo

    Some martial arts that I've trained in that have had an overarching philosophy, but no Do have been the following.

    Tai Chi Chuan
    Arnis De Mano Baston Batangas
    Jeet Kune Do

    An example of a martial art that I've trained in that does not include a concept of Do would be the following.

    Wrestling
    Boxing
     
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  3. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    Funakoshi Gichin was the founder of Shotokan. Funakoshi laid out the Niju Kun in order to describe the philosophy of Shotokan.

    Nij? kun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


     
  4. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    Jigoro Kano was the founder of Judo. Here is what he said of the Do in 1915.

    "Judo is the way of the highest or most efficient use of both physical and mental energy. Through training in the attack and defence techniques of judo, the practitioner nurtures their physical and mental strength, and gradually embodies the essence of the Way of Judo. Thus, the ultimate objective of Judo discipline is to be utilized as a means to self-perfection, and thenceforth to make a positive contribution to society."
     
  5. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    Tang Soo Do philosophy is kind of all over the place, but it loosely follows Shotokan. Hwang Kee incorporated a lot of Daoism into the philosophy of Tang Soo Do.
     
  6. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    Seishiro Okazaki founded Dan Zan Ryu Jujutsu in Hawaii and he incorporated the philosophy of Kokua into his martial art. Kokua is a Hawaiian term that means to help each other. In Dan Zan Ryu, the overarching philosophy is for it's practitioners to help each other learn the art, to become better people, and to make a better community.
     
  7. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    I always liked the Boy scouts motto, Trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent. I know it's old fashion to some, but I don't care. Not a bad way to be. I also love the tenets of Bushido, (whether they actually came from the Samurai or not), Rectitude, courage, benevolence, respect, honesty, honor and loyalty. Again, probably old fashioned to most, but important and meaningful to me and mine.

    I think that's what you mean by "do". I think social etiquettes are more important in some dojos than others. Especially dojos in a city with a high volume of young people. Lot of lost, tough kids in these kind of dojos, and many don't have a stable home life. If you only teach how to fight, you sometimes end up with kids that have more problems than when they started. And, in my experience, they take to the discipline and philosophy like a duck to water. But it don't mean a rats *** if they aren't being led by example.

    I've been in a few BJJ schools. The ones I've been in didn't have any of this. And little or no bowing. Yet, the ones I've been in (just my experience) were some of the nicest, honest and gentlemanly dojos I've ever been in. I think the example the instructors and higher ranks set made this so, I'm not really sure. It just seemed to always be the same way in the ones I was in. Always. Maybe because new students, no matter how tough outside, are suddenly goldfish in a shark farm, I dunno'.

    I insist my students be ladies and gentleman. Do I care what they do outside the dojo? Damn right I do. I'll help them all I can, but they have to display the proper attitude and etiquette. Of course there's the flip side of the coin. I know some dojos that have wonderful etiquette and students that seem to love what they have. But if somebody actually got a bloody nose they'd probably panic and call an ambulance.

    Then there's DT in Law Enforcement. It's easy with cadets, because they're scared to death of screwing up. They are all spit shine and polish. Different with In Service training. No 20 year street cop really cares what you want to teach, and I can't say I blame them. But guys a few years in are easy to get to buy into "the do". I always start the same way, "What's the number one duty of a police officer?" You get the standard answers, uphold the public trust, help the innocent, blah, blah. I tell them "The number one duty of a police officer is to finish his shift and make it home to his family, alive and in one piece." Because of the limited time with these guys, that's "the do" and it always seems to work.

    Then there's the other do. The "dough". Bring plenty if in one of these schools.
     
  8. K-man

    K-man Grandmaster

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    A number of karate schools have a dojo kun. This is the one passed down from Chojun Miyagi, founder of Goju Ryu, via Eiichi Miyazato.


     

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