Tang Soo Do Organizations that focus on kata-based instruction

Discussion in 'Tang Soo Do' started by Makalakumu, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

    • MartialTalk Mentor
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2003
    Messages:
    13,887
    Likes Received:
    231
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Location:
    Hawaii
    I'm working on a second volume actually, where each kata has a set of lesson plans that incorporate all of the techniques and basic knowledge to teach applications effectively. The key is that you actually have to break the movements of the application into what we call basics and then use the principles of the application to spar.
     
  2. reeskm

    reeskm Green Belt

    Joined:
    May 23, 2014
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Calgary
    I am highly interested in your work. Please keep me in the loop!

    But a question - by sparring in this case you do not mean sport sparring correct?
    I'm envisioning that your applications would translate into a new set of one-step sparring (il-soo-sik dae-ryun)?

    My students are starting to memorize the current set we have almost perfectly, and tying it directly into the hyungs would bring more meaning to our il-so-sik practice. :asian:
     
  3. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

    • MartialTalk Mentor
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2003
    Messages:
    13,887
    Likes Received:
    231
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Location:
    Hawaii
    By sparring I don't necessarily mean sport sparring, but some of those aspects could apply and be useful. I like to break down the movements of the bunkai by breaking it into the individual parts. This is what we call basics. Then, we put them together in what would resemble Ill Soo Shik until we have some simple demonstration that combines all of the basics we learned. Then, we'll start to look at the principles, variations and finally begin training with resisting partners until it looks like a controlled sparring situation. There are rules that maintain everyone's safety and the goals are specifically set in order to test the principle in a more lively situation. We always start slow and work up the intensity of sparring.

    In my dojo, learning the bunkai as Ill Soo Shik is the beginning of being able to practice it. It's more of a memorization tool for principle, allowing practitioners to make a connection between basics, forms, bunkai and sparring.
     
  4. King Mike

    King Mike White Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I just made this account, so you probably don't respect me that much...
    I am in the Mi Guk Kwan (Grandmaster C. Ferraro) , they have all the forms that the International Tang Soo Do Federation (Grandmaster Kim)
    plus more.
    The one steps are pretty simple...there are 10 basic one steps, and 18 advanced....
    The "Ho sin sul" (if you do those) are.... Cross-hand Grabs 1-4, Same side 1-4, Two hands on one 1-3, Two on Two 1-4, Side Grabs 1-2, and Behind the back grabs 1-2

    The Mi Guk Kwan has:
    28 One-steps
    19 Self Defense Techniques (Ho Sin Sul)
    Plus a few more forms than the International Tang Soo Do Federation....I was in the ITF 5 years ago, but I like the MGK way better.

    Forms (Below Black Belt):
    Kicho Hyung Il Bu
    Kicho Hyung Ee Bu
    Kicho Hyung Sam Bu
    Chil Sung Ee Ro
    Pyong Ahn Cho Dan
    Pyong Ahn Ee Dan
    Pyong Ahn Sam Dan
    Pyong Ahn Sa Dan
    Pyong Ahn Oh Dan
    Chil Sung Il Ro
    Bassai Dai (A.K.A "Bassai", "Bassai Hyung", or "Bassai Dae"...don't ask me why...)
    Chil Sung Sam Ro
    Nai Han Chi Cho Dan

    There is a LOT more forms for black belt and above...I'm too lazy to write them all down. :lool:

    I hope I helped out....
    King Mike:wavey:
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. Badger1777

    Badger1777 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2014
    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    68
    We do all of the above at our school. Its also considered a core requirement to grading that you can do all of the above.
     
  6. reeskm

    reeskm Green Belt

    Joined:
    May 23, 2014
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Calgary
    Welcome King Mike! We have bought all of GM Ferarro's videos and generally, I like them very much. This is exactly the same curriculum we have in our class at the moment. This also happens to align directly with the older out of print books published by the Tang Soo (Soo Bahk) Do Moo Duk Kwan, that are labelled according to belt colours: White, Yellow, Orange, Green and Red. This is why we bought and promote GM Ferraros' DVD set.

    Mind you, they are not perfect. Then again, I have never seen a book or DVD on martial arts that dosen't have mistakes in it, or differs slightly depending on the instructor or artist demonstrating the techniques. It's hard enough for all of our black belts to be all on the same page in our school! But, GM Ferraro's set a definitive example, for sure.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. reeskm

    reeskm Green Belt

    Joined:
    May 23, 2014
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Calgary
    With respect Badger, I do not believe any TSD school does what Makalakumu is doing right now. A lot of them say they do, but they don't.
    What Makalakumu is doing is implementing a system similar to what Pat McCarthy of the IRKRS and Ian Abernathy have been promoting for many years: realistic self defense applications for real life or death sparring (not necessarily sport sparring) based directly off the hyungs.

    He is not referring to the way "applications" are typically taught in the TSD way. The way I've always seen them is presented as an aside in the textbooks, (ex: this is against an overhead knife attack, with pic), or as a one off explanation during a class or seminar (ex: teacher asks the class: what's this for? and then demonstrates, or ex 2: you, come up here! punch at me, and i defend. this is what it's for!). This style is best suited to and most popular in Korea and my opinion is that it developed over many years of Koreans training the military, police and very large classes. They are the masters at it.

    However, I would like to point out that my teacher would spend entire classes lecturing and teaching us the hidden movements and applications of forms. But, this was special and not a comprehensive lesson plan/systematic approach. It was because he felt like passing on what he had learned to his students at that particular moment.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. TaiChiTJ

    TaiChiTJ Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Messages:
    450
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    28
    With respect, we all need, I think, to learn the nuts and bolts of "thinking outside the box".

    I am glad you have that skill, however not all of us have it. Someday someone will come up with a step-by-step approach to it. Perhaps the OP is moving in that direction.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

bunkai for tang soo do hyungs

,

bunkai in cs kim karate

,

bunkai of tang soo do