Reading Kicks & Movement in Sparring.

Discussion in 'Muay Thai' started by andyscriven, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. andyscriven

    andyscriven White Belt

    Joined:
    May 8, 2016
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I use this drill with my students and in my own training.

    I found it really good for reading the movement of my opponent. As its a safe drill beginners like it and they learn the motion of blocking in addition to being kicked at full speed.

    It would be interesting to see how practitioners drill this concept.


     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    16,454
    Likes Received:
    4,685
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    I like that. I've been working on developing a series of drills to help students learn to recognize punches and kicks. Any thoughts on developing that for low kicks (we rarely kick that high)? My concern is getting a pad out on a thigh kick, for instance the bigger pads could reach, but they'd have to be held by the top, so they'd be awfully slow getting to target.
     
  3. marques

    marques Master Black Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,111
    Likes Received:
    353
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Location:
    Essex, UK
    Another two complementary drills:

    1. Never stop at the kick range and "power point" (so every kick will weak or more "prepared" - slow)
    2. Looking/observing/reading the feet position. It indicates what the opponent wants to do or what we can do with danger - so we can prepare for that or move away before it comes.

    I am saying that, because if I want only to read the hips and wait the kick quietly, I am likely to be trapped by a more experienced opponent. On the other side, I use it myself. I throw a telegraphic kick just to stop the opponent and going were I want (right distance and right angle). Or I move hips without kick... "Not to be there" is the easiest and effective (seen in MMA all the time - step back/aside).
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2015
    Messages:
    6,278
    Likes Received:
    1,805
    Trophy Points:
    263
    I didn't hear what was said but it looks similar to what I tell my students. I tell students to pay attention to what the kicks and punches of their partner looks like when we to pad drills. I remind students to hold the pad in front or close to the body to help create the feeling that the attacks are coming at them. I give them things to look for and to be aware of movements. Some just hold the pads off to the side and just become a person holding a pad. Others actually do what I tell them and become engaged. Once you are engaged you for that you are holding a pad and start to study the attacks that strike the pad. instead of me holding a pad for my partner, it becomes comes more like strike this pad so I can study your punch.
     
  5. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2015
    Messages:
    6,278
    Likes Received:
    1,805
    Trophy Points:
    263
    #2 is why I pay close attention to the legs in feet. A person's stance will dictate what can or cannot be done while in a specific position. When ya person looks into martial arts stances and clothing, he will begin to see how that system tries to conceal the footwork and stance. Aikido is notorious for this, kung fu has crazy footwork to hide motion within motion.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2002
    Messages:
    3,512
    Likes Received:
    1,757
    Trophy Points:
    388
    Location:
    New Iberia, Louisiana USA
    Good drill for beginners. We do much the same but I have the pad holder begin to slightly lift the knee on the kicking side as they turn into the kick. Does a couple things;
    1- they get used to receiving the kick standing on one leg helping develop balance.
    2- they are developing the timing needed for leg shields.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. marques

    marques Master Black Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,111
    Likes Received:
    353
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Location:
    Essex, UK
    Yep, I would train it more (or first) than reading hips.

    Against good and fast kicker when I see hips, it's too late. Any defence may prevent major damage but always painful, specially if set up.

    But reading a stance... Before any (hip) movement, I can start running away and shouting "Maaaam!!" :D (Or anything less embarrassing than this.)
     
    • Funny Funny x 2

Share This Page