More Fiore Videos

Discussion in 'Historical European Swords and Sword Arts' started by Langenschwert, Oct 15, 2017.

  1. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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    These guys are at it again:



    Interesting that they included the "three turns of the sword" which Fiore mentions but never defines. I think that their interpretation is likely correct, and makes sense. Fiore defines the three turns of the body in detail, and only mentions that the sword likewise has three turns.



    I've always admired Fiore's system. It's simple, elegant, and beautiful to watch. It's also complete in one manual showing many weapons by one master. The contemporary German school (my HEMA system of choice) is spread out over multiple masters, but is vast. Joachim Meyer's manual (also a complete system) was from 150 years later.
     
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  2. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Is this a reconstruction from a manual?
     
  3. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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  4. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    The guards like that because swords are heavy and so have to choose a side to hit from?

    In which case you would have to mirror them guard wise all the time.
     
  5. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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    The swords are light, coming in about 3 to 3.5 lbs for those shown. You need a certain amount of tip rotation and also rotation of the body's core to deliver an effective cut. You can choose a guard on either side relative to your opponent. The German system more often (but not always) assumes that the opposition is symmetrical; i.e both cutting from their own right sides. In contrast, the Italian system shown more often (but again, not always) has for example, a right high guard vs. a left low guard. The choice is dependent on what you want to accomplish.

    There is a variant in the German school which has the sword held directly overhead, allowing a cut to be done easily from either side. However, it is entirely possible to cut from the left if holding the sword on the right. It's just not as comfortable.
     
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  6. pgsmith

    pgsmith Master Black Belt

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    Thanks for posting that, I like their videos!
    I've been threatening to get a decent longsword for years, but still haven't gotten around to it. :)
     
  7. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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    Let me know if you plan on getting one and I can help you select a good manufacturer. ☺
     
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