More bagwork

Discussion in 'Members in Motion' started by KangTsai, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    Bag stuff after chest and shoulders yipee.

    And a hands burnout.

     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017
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  2. CB Jones

    CB Jones Master of Arts

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    Nice work.

    The idea that you get back what you put in is false...in reality, you never get back what you put in so you have to be willing to put in extra. The output never equals the input.

    That's the difference in being successful and just getting by in all things.
     
  3. Headhunter

    Headhunter Master of Arts

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    Again get those hands up when your punching your guard is basically non existent and your head is wide open for a counter
     
  4. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    ???
     
  5. CB Jones

    CB Jones Master of Arts

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    Keep working hard....the extra work you put in will be difference.

    In everything, willingness to do more than required will lead you to success.
     
  6. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Senior Master

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    Try not to straighten your knees as much. Straight knees means that your body is not ready to push off to cut angle, advance, and retreat. Knees should always be in a position to literally spring into action. From a safety concern you are increasing your risk for knee damage. The straighter the knees are the more the twists from your torso will damage them. Find a good balance that will allow you to have your knees slightly bent.

    From a self-defense perspective if you were in a street fight with me, and I see your knees lock like they do, then I'm taking them out, simply because you locking your legs makes that task much easier.

    From a sporting side of things. You are putting yourself a greater risk for knee injury from a wild or poorly aimed kick, that may land on your straight legs.

    Most important. More important than losing your knees. Always use your bag work to develop good techniques and good habits. Don't just make it about hitting hard and fast.
     
  7. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    This may be a stylistic difference, but try to use angles more. There are a lot of times where you could be coming in on an angle, and instead you just go straight in. If you only practice stepping in straight, when you go to spar that's all you will be able to do.
     
  8. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    What is the purpose of your workout? Cardio? Very good...keep at it but don't take so many breaks between your bag attacks.
    If it is for good fighting then you need to spend a lot of time getting your fundamentals correct before spending much time wailing away like you are doing. Practice makes habit and this practice is developing many bad habits for you.
    Get with your coach/instructor show them this video and request they work with you on one or two of the fundamentals to get them correct and then practice them when correct on the heavy bag.
     
  9. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    OP.
    A trick for that is to get the right elbow and see how it is beside your body?

    Bring it infront of your body and rest it there. Hands will stay up a bit easierand it will also be easier to fire off a punch.
     
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  10. DanT

    DanT Black Belt

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    Nice work, I personaly hate those types of bags, I always knock them over even when they're filled to the max (I think it's only 200 lbs-ish when filled).
     
  11. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    I don't like them either, but beggars can't be choosers.
     
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  12. Dylan9d

    Dylan9d Guest

    Sorry but I don't agree with your statement because it isn't false......more than 100% isn't possible so how can you put in extra work if you already commit for a fully 100%.

    For the OP nice workout
     
  13. Dylan9d

    Dylan9d Guest

    Is this from a WC perspective? Because I don't think you want a couple of his punches on your guts or face.......
     
  14. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    This is from a good fundamental fighting perspective.
    He telegraphs his punches, hands are low and he doesn't bring his shoulder into his jaw not only for power but for protection which leaves him open to many different counter attacks, his legs are straight and stiff for too much.

    As I stated: He needs to spend a lot of time getting his fundamentals correct before spending much time wailing away like he's doing. Practice makes habit and this practice is developing many bad habits.
     
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  15. Dylan9d

    Dylan9d Guest

    He looks to me like a pretty decent kickboxer. And I don't judge him from a Pukulan or Pentjak Silat perspective.

    Maybe you should make a video how to do it @Danny T :)
     
  16. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Senior Master

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    Even light practice builds habit. Light doesn't mean we get lazy with technique. Being tired means we have to try harder to hold technique. Your statement "Practice makes habit" should be a required understanding. For any type of training be it martial arts, music, or life in general
     
  17. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    So you disagree with wi that he telegraphs
    Yep...go only as fast and as hard as you can doing it properly. In time you can slowly increase the intensity. Of course one can go hard and fast making a lot of mistakes with fundamentals then spend a lot of additional time correcting them.
     
  18. Dylan9d

    Dylan9d Guest

    Problem is that someone criticize someone without giving any backing behind his reasoning. The other part of the problem is that "bad habits" for one art doesn't have to be bad for others.

    For example I sincerely believe that Wing Chun teaches alot of bullcrap and teaches exclusively bad habits. I'm saying that and I'm not gonna explain myself any further......Because I like being vague, right Danny :)

    Still waiting on your video Danny
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 22, 2017
  19. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Senior Master

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    While bad habits for one art doesn't = bad habits for another art is true. It does become more of an issue in terms of sports vs self-defense. TKD kicks with hands down is fine for TKD olympic sport. But it builds bad habit for self-defense and over all safety even in olympic TKD. I've seen videos of people who get knocked out in Olympic TKD simply because their hands were down. They weren't kicking or doing any striking. Had they had their hands up then they have been able to at a minimum interfere with the incoming kick if not stop it. For me. Hands down is a safety issue not a martial arts issue. I've seen multiple people in multiple fighting system pay the price for having hands down. I would rather have the habit of keeping my hands up vs the habit of keeping them down.


    For me personally the OP can train anyway that he sees fits be it kicking with hands down or moving around with straight legs and he won't have any problem with staying fit and having a good workout. However if he steps into the world of self-defense or sparring then he'll have to fix some the things he's doing now. My punch burnouts are different than his are. I do stationary punch burnouts with the focus of punching as fast as I can and do as many punches I can, in spurts of 20 - 50 punches at a time, without losing the quality of my technique. When I feel things getting sloppy then I slow down, when I feel myself getting tense then I relax (I air punch). This type of drill isn't a fighting one.

    For my burnout drills that are more like fighting, then I limit the number of punches or kicks that I will do between 1 - 5 punch combos and I go at it, using both blocking movements and evasive movements mixed in with the combos. At the end of a combo I have a quick reset, get off center to avoid my imaginary opponent's attack. Even if it's a light workout I try not to get lazy with the mindset that I need to be in.
     
  20. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    Being Vague??
    I can only assume you missed my stating:
    "He telegraphs his punches, hands are low and he doesn't bring his shoulder into his jaw not only for power but for protection which leaves him open to many different counter attacks, his legs are straight and stiff..."

    And as I already stated; I'm not comparing to wing chun training but to fighting.
     

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