looking to get started, dont know which style to pick

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by HypnoToad, Mar 10, 2005.

  1. HypnoToad

    HypnoToad Guest

    I recently quit playing counter strike professionaly(to any players on here i was former cal i) and i need a new hobby.i tried playing bass, but i have zero musical talent. ive tried tons of stuff and now im moving on to martial arts.

    i started reasearching about a week ago and im overwhemeled in trying to pick a style and school so i decided to let some actully educated people pick for me:)
    here are my charactrisitcs(sp?)
    5'5
    semiatheletic
    140 pounds
    flexible(former gymnast, not an incredibly good one though, i broke my foot doing a backflip and quit, i can still do back hand springs though :p)
    preferbly i want a style that is more offensive and more combat oriented rather than spirtual( spirtual is ok, but i happen to have alot of enemies[very long story])

    So, ill close with asking you guys to reccomend a style


    HypnoToad
     
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  2. Chronuss

    Chronuss Senior Master

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    you really need to ellaborate on what you're looking to get out of a system (style is how you personally execute techniques or basics, a system, or art, is what you're looking for to study).
     
  3. Sam

    Sam Senior Master

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    ahh, another former gymnast... they tease me at my Tracy's Kenpo Karate Studio for my flexibility. Just be warned that flexibility can be a curse in the martial arts - that's what I've found in my limited time. (for instance, most people have to lean over to kick someone in the head, which protects their head because its too far to be hit. But if you don't need to, you probably won't at first. Its hard, especially when you are tired and feeling lazy, when leaning over is just extra energy wasted that you dont wanna waste. The first time you get hit in the head though you will realize it is NOT wasted energy. But its a hard habit to break. Was for me, anyway)

    Like chronuss said, you need to put more info...
     
  4. Drac

    Drac Sr. Grandmaster

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    I don't know if anyone can answer that question for you..Go to the Yellow Pages pick a school and give it try( minumum of 3 months) if it's not your cup of tea you can move on..My opinion..
     
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  5. Colin_Linz

    Colin_Linz Blue Belt

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    I’ve examined your post in detail, and after careful and extensive research there can be no doubt that you will need to Shorinji Kempo.:rolleyes:
     
  6. stephen

    stephen Purple Belt

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    Don't pick a style, pick a teacher!

    /steve
     
  7. rutherford

    rutherford Master Black Belt

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    Wisdom!

    HypnoToad, location matters a lot in this sort of thing, unless you're at a point in your training where you will move to seek out teachers. What schools do you have in your area? Visit some.
     
  8. shane23ss

    shane23ss Blue Belt

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    Kenpo, Kenpo, Kenpo!!!! But then again, I am a little biast.
     
  9. masherdong

    masherdong 2nd Black Belt

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    I would say give Kenpo a shot.
     
  10. Sam

    Sam Senior Master

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    As you can see, there are a lot of kenpoists out here. But that doesn't mean that you shouldn't check out other things. Everyone is partial to their own art. Just check out some schools near by, talk to some teachers, that kind of thing. Follow your gut. Beware of schools that brag incessantly about the instructor's lineage. Don't be afraid to ask questions.
     
  11. Han-Mi

    Han-Mi Purple Belt

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    I agree with most of the other posts here, the teacher is the most important choice, then style. If you can get a good teacher in kenpo but a great teacher in shorin-ryu, tak shorin-ryu.

    However, to humor your question, Kenpo in some form would probably be best for your situation. It is one of the best for effective application early in training. But again, be sure the instructor is the best you can get.
     
  12. If I may say, I've tried a few things: I'm pretty darn good at Judo (beat a former national champion in open tournament), a licensed instructor of CDT (non-lethal restraint), and hold some fairly high ranks in some other things. I attended a variety of classes and styles while living in Asia.

    so what do I think now? Well, I teach at my own school in West Los Angeles... and it's a very old traditional training with the Jinenkan. In this case, traditional means effective - no points, no rules, no sports. In this regard, it's nice to have been trained in CDT, so that I can point out some of the liability components of what I teach to my students.

    I've done a LOT of searching - for 20+ years - tried a LOT of martial arts, had a LOT of matches, and the Jinenkan offers what I want. It's effective (I've used what I've learned - more than once), has a spiritual side, but we don't stress that over the technique, and has a history that makes it interesting.
     
  13. JAMJTX

    JAMJTX Blue Belt

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    It will depend on what you like. Are you looking just for sport, or a traditonal style that will teach mental and spiritual aspects? All empty hand or weapons?
    Do you like striking (punches, kicks) or grappling/throwing? Or a combination?

    If your not sure, the best thing to do is call around to local clubs and ask if you can watch a class and see what it's like. Many clubs will even let you take a class or even a few.

    Look at a few schools and see what interests you.

    You can always come back and ask more questions.
     
  14. Randy Strausbaugh

    Randy Strausbaugh Master Black Belt

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    1. Take anything the instructor says with a grain of salt. There are many excellent, truthful instructors out there, but they are far outnumbered by the pinheads who wish to lighten your wallet and stroke their egos. Most claims can be checked out through the internet or with a long distance phone call.
    2. Look at the students. Many individuals who are personally talented can't teach worth spit. The quality of the school's students will tell you what you may expect to achieve. If you look at the senior students and say "I wish that was me", keep the school on your list.
    3. If the instructor tells you that winning tournaments will make you a great fighter, run. Combat effectiveness and sport excellence are not mutually exclusive, but one doesn't necessarily lead to the other.
    4. If you find the right school/instructor, be willing to travel to study there. Of course most people can't reasonably uproot their life and move to a school, but most people can drive farther for lessons than they think they can.

    Good luck, and let us know how it goes :) .
     
  15. theletch1

    theletch1 Grandmaster

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    Check out a few threads in the "Horror Stories" forum here to see what to stay away from and what things should set off alarm bells when interviewing an instructor. Don't feel too bad if the first school or style that you try doesn't work out for you. In fact, it's rare that it does (IMHO). Just keep trying until you find and instructor and style that just "feels" right. There isn't really any other way that I can put it. It's a lot like finding the right mate. Get into it slowly, feel your way into the relationship, if it doesn't feel right move on. Eventually (hopefully) you'll find the perfect match and train healthfully ever after. Good luck.
     
  16. Elizium

    Elizium Guest

    This answer can not be answered by us on Martialtalk. If the originator of the question takes our advice and goes for say, Kempo, the poster may end up in a system that is not really for the person.


    If the poster wants a combat system, then Krav Maga, Kempo (Colin saying Shironji is to be expected, even though he post on the proboard's AMA with his bud, Kimpatsu :whip: ), any of the kans (Bujinkan, Genbukan and Jinenkan) as not only does it teach unarmed, but allows room to use any weapon that may come to hand (our dojo is currently looking at Escrema stick fighting). If you want anything to do with ninja, then stay clear of the Black Dragon society. They all claim Koga Ryu, even though most of the systems died out in the 18th-19th Century.

    If you want a nice flow of MA, try Taiji. It is mostly called Tai Chi, but Taiji is more MA orientated than Chi. Ying and Chen styles are good Taiji. If you want recommendation, ask the local police. They will tell you of a good instructor that is worth learning from.
     
  17. Colin_Linz

    Colin_Linz Blue Belt

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    Come on now. The Black Dragon style was going to be my second suggestion. Ashida Kim is a true master, and such a wonderful author.[​IMG]
     
  18. Elizium

    Elizium Guest

    Well he could go to Japan and learn Shironji from Tony. That is, if he finds his tooth. :rolleyes:
     
  19. thepanjr

    thepanjr Green Belt

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    pick any karate or tkd or jkd
     
  20. Flatlander

    Flatlander Grandmaster

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    Why? Can you support this response with reasoning? Members post to the Beginner's Corner because they would like to procure useful advice or help in making some very important decisions regarding their Martial Art training. Generally, decisions are easier to make when one is aware of the options available, and the consequences and benefits associated with each. Perhaps expanding on your ideas here may be beneficial to the people to whom you are directing advice.123
     

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