Jun Fan Gung-Fu (techniques and drills)

Discussion in 'JKD / Jeet Kune Do' started by seekeroftruth, Aug 26, 2002.

  1. Hello,
    Does anyone have a good example of a basic Jun Fan Gung Fu curriculum? (Please be specific) My Jun Fan is a little rusty, and I am trying to get my technique back. I know the basic progression, but I am looking for a more specific curriculum to supplement my personal training. Thanks in advance.
    Seeker of Truth
     
  2. Seattle Curriculum

    Gin-Lai or Salutation

    Bi-jong or ready stance
    · (Incorporating the Centerline Theory)

    Immovable Elbow Theory

    Four Corner Theory

    Footwork:
    a. Forward
    b. Backward
    c. Shifting right
    d. Shifting left

    Sil Lim Tao (basic form taught in Seattle)

    Straight punches and elbow punches and various body punches

    Bil-jee (finger jab)

    Kicks:
    a. Forward straight heel kick
    b. Forward shovel kick
    c. Side kick
    1- Low side kick
    d. Low toe kick
    e. Groin toe kick
    f. Hook kick (medium & high)
    g. Spinning back hook kicks

    Chi Sao (sticking hands)



    Blocks:
    a. Tan sao
    b. Bong sao
    c. Gong sao
    d. Vertical fist punch
    e. Fook sao or elbow contained bent wrist block
    f. Palm strikes - vertical - side - and palm up

    Techniques:
    a. Pak sao
    b. Lop sao
    c. Chop chuie - Gwa chuie
    d. Pak sao lop sao gwa chuie
    e. Lop sao chung chuie lop sao chung chuie
    f. Chop chuie gwa chuie lop sao chung chuie



    Oakland Curriculum

    1. Salutation

    2. Kicking Drills:
    a. Five corner kicking: alternating kicks between left and right foot.
    b. Five corner kicking: from low to high.
    c. Clockwork kicking: real-time kicking with the closest weapon.
    d. Combination clockwork kicking & hitting: advanced.
    Key: real-time, no hesitation, closest weapon to closest target.

    3. Stance: Bi jong
    a. Lead stance: shuffle, front, rear, side.
    b. Form is the essence, balanced, smooth, feet stay on the ground, (skating)
    c. Strictly lower body movements: each movement is independent.
    d. Comfortable and alive, natural bounce, not rigid or stiff with hops or jumps.
    e. Shuffle to various strikes and kicks.
    Key: be alive and comfortable.

    4. Evasive Maneuvers
    a. Evade various strikes (some exaggerated to make easier)
    b. Evade various kicks.
    c. Evade various combinations of strikes and kicks.
    d. Minimal movement to make opponent miss.
    - Know what position and distance is safe for you.
    - Individualize and adapt to the size and reach of the opponent.
    f. Evade and counter: after learning the above.
    Keys: Better to miss by an inch then to block by a mile.
    - To block is to get hit.
    - Don't engage the opponent, disengage him.
    (e.g. don't tangle yourself in blocking and trapping movements)
    - The whole idea is to intercept his physical and emotional intent to hurt you.


    5. Classical versus the New (modern)
    a. Sil lim tao: performed the classical way.
    b. Regarding trapping: cut the movement in half for realism.
    - Concentrate on speed and economy.
    Key: economy of motion, efficiency.

    c. Hook punch: closer to the body then a boxer.
    - Elbow next to the rib, much tighter and compact.
    Key: centerline theory (from the center, not outside or wide).
    - Take the skin (or paint) off of your ribs.
    d. Rear heel kick: tighter, more centered.
    Key: Take the skin (or paint) off the inside of your legs.

    6. Separate punching drills:
    a. Centerline punching (rapid): straight-line blast with closing footwork.
    b. Separate kicking drills
    - Two Aspects for improved kicking:
    1. Power: Water in the hose analogy for transfer of force through target.
    2. Speed: Whip analogy for speed of recovery:
    (e.g. shoe laces pop, kicking a gnat out of the air)
    c. Combine, blend power with speed drills, make adjustments.
    Keys: Delivery system - instant, fast relaxed.
    - Hand before foot
    - Non-telegraphic (no pre-steps or stutter steps)(for punching: no flinching)
    - Complete emphasis on speed and economy of motion.
    - The less you move the better.
    - Clean and sharp as a two edged sword, pure Chinese Kung-Fu.
    - Power comes with time, sometimes years; on the spot power.
    - Speed comes with accuracy.
    - Proper form and body alignment with balance.
    - Footwork is supposed to be light and easy, not jumping around stiff, but relaxed and smooth without deliberation, angular and instant.


    7. Basic Trapping.
    a. Pak sao
    b. Lop sao
    c. Gong sao
    d. Jut sao
    e. Tan sao
    f. Bong sao
    g. Economy of motion: cut these movements in half.
    h. One hand trap
    i. Two hand trap
    Key: Trapping is only a by-product.
    - Hit, hit and more hit: not trap, trap and then hit.
    - While engaging an opponent, if there's emptiness…Hit.
    - Skim and glide with friction but let the Chi flow.

    8. Line drills (Quiet awareness)
    - Sensitivity: Touch vs. Non-Touch.

    9. Distance: Measure your distance
    a. Safe
    b. No man's land
    c. Gates, body positions, and zones
    Key: Put yourself where you're safe and the opponent is not.
    - Circle to the outside of the strong side, away from rear hand.
    - Immobilize the lead leg or hand, after you hit, not before.

    10. Practice Drills
    a. Attack and defense.
    Key: Stun him first, before obstruction, to break his rhythm or forward momentum.

    11. Apparatus training
    a. Finger jab
    b. Straight blast
    c. Side kick: shin, knee target
    d. Side kick: power through target
    e. Strikes to traps
    f. Kicks to traps
    g. Bridging the gap
    h. Basic wing chun traps
    i. Strike to hand immobilization to takedown
    j. Kick to leg immobilization to takedown
    k. Backfist (high to low, low to high)
    Keys: All trapping concludes in hitting
    - Don't punch and kick at an opponent, kick and punch through him
    - Broken rhythm (Don't be predictable)
    - Using the stop-kick as a jab as you incorporate it in footwork
    (e.g. be loose, fluid, Ali-like)

    12. Burning Step: hand to foot impetus.

    13. The pendulum: avoidance then following back swiftly and instantaneously.

    14. Basic and primary goal: Each student must find his own
    - Identifying the tools
    - Using the tools
    - Sharpening the tools
    - Dissolving the tools
    In adapting to the opponent:
    - The Three Phrases:
    a. Ice: solid, unchanging, rigid.
    b. Water: liquid, flowing.
    c. Steam: gaseous, focused pressure.


    Los Angeles Curriculum

    Fitness Program
    a. Alternate splits
    b. Waist twisting (three times to each side)
    c. Run in place
    d. Shoulder circling
    e. High kicks
    f. Side kick raise
    g. Sit-ups
    h. Waist twisting
    i. Leg raises
    j. Forward bends

    Punching:
    (Hanging paper, glove, glove pad, wall pad, heavy bag)
    a. Warm-up - the letting out of water [the idea of dropping the hammer loosely]
    b. The straight punch (left/right)
    - with pursuing
    c. The entering straight right
    - high
    - low
    d. The back fist

    Kicking:
    a. Warm-up - (left/right)
    - letting out of water
    - the whip
    b. Side kick - (left/right)
    [note: choice of group training method]
    - Facing two lines
    - In group
    - One student comes out
    c. Straight kick - (left/right)
    d. Rear kick
    e. The shin/knee/groin kicks
    f. Hook kicks [low first] and toe kick
    g. Combination kicking - eventually with hand

    Basic Defense:
    a. The stop hit
    - The shin/knee kick
    - The finger jab (close range)
    - Any type of kick to fit in
    b. The four corner counter

    Power training:
    a. Isometric training:
    - The upward outward force
    - The basic power training
    - The punch
    - The kick

    Classical techniques
    a. Pak sao
    b. Lop sao
    c. Gwa chuie
    d. Chop chuie/gwa chuie
    e. Pak sao/gwa chuie
    f. Double lop sao (a & b)
    g. Chop chuie/gwa chuie, lop sao/gwa chuie
    h. Jut sao
    i. Pak sao/jut sao
    j. Chop chuie/gwa chuie/jut tek
    k. Inside gate tan da
    l. Tan da low/gwa chuie
    m. Chop chuie/gwa chuie/lop sao

    Combination:
    a. Right hand feint with groin kick
    b. Right kick feint with bil-jee
    c. Right feint to stomach with right straight to head
    d. Right feint to head shift to right to stomach.



    The Three Facets to Jeet Kune Do

    1. Non-Classical:
    That is, there were and are no classical postures, no unrealistic footwork, no mechanical body movements, no dissection of movement (i.e. "first you do this, then you do this, and then you do this," etc.) as if it were a corpse. Further, there are no two-man cooperation drills and no rhythmic forms. Instead, the art is "alive" and infused with broken rhythm.

    2. Directness:
    There is no passive defense, blocking is considered the least efficient manner of defense. Everything in the art is stripped to its essential components with absolutely no fancy decoration or ornate movements (i.e., if somebody grabs you, punch him!). Students are taught to see reality in its such-ness and not deliberate about it. Simply experience it as it is, when it is. As if, when someone throws something to you, you catch it - you don't first grunt and go into a horse stance. And similarly, when someone grabs you, you hit him - you don't get involved in elaborate joint manipulations and complex maneuvering.

    3. Simplicity:
    a. A daily minimize instead of a daily increase (being wise doesn't mean to "add" more, being wise means to be able to get off sophistication and be simply simple)
    b. The three stages in Jeet Kune Do
    1- Sticking to the Nucleus
    2- Liberation from the Nucleus
    3- Returning to the original freedom

    Or:
    "Before I studied the art, a punch was just like a punch, a kick was just like a kick. After I studied the art, a punch is no longer a punch, a kick is no longer a kick. Now that I understood the art, a punch is just like a punch, a kick is just like a kick."
     
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  3. BASIC TRAPPING PROGRESSION
    JUN FAN METHOD

    1966 PROGRESSION

    1) Pak Sao Da

    a) By reference point attachment
    b) Bridging the gap to attachment
    c) By feinting then bridging the gap to pak sao da by capturing
    d) Pak sao da by capturing
    i) In flight during attack
    ii) In chambering position before attack
    iii) In chambering position after attack

    2) Types of Pak sao da

    a) Gnoy da or O’ouy da
    b) Loy da (two types)
    i) Inside of wu sao
    ii) Outside of wu sao
    c) Jung da
    d) Ha da

    3) Pak sao da to Jik chung chuie

    4) Pak sao da – Bong sao – Lop sao da with qua chuie or Sut sao (Fak sao) – Gum sao da

    5) Pak sao da – Loy Pak sao da

    6) Pak sao da – Chung chuie – Loy Pak sao da

    7) Pak sao da – Biu sao as wedge – Pak sao da – Lop sao da - Pak sao da

    8) Pak sao da – Biu sao as wedge – Lop sao with chung chuie - Pak sao da

    9) Pak sao da – Biu sao as wedge – Lop sao da – right Sut sao (Fak sao) – Gum sao da

    10) Pak sao da – Biu sao as wedge – Pak sao da – left Sut sao (Fak sao)

    11) Pak sao da – Biu sao as wedge – Lop sao da – Pak sao da – left Sut sao da (Fak sao)

    12) Pak sao da – Biu sao as wedge – Lop sao da – right Sut sao (Fak sao) – Cup sao da (Kao sao da)

    13) Pak sao da – Jao sao – double Jut Sao – gum sao da – Jang (elbow)

    14) Pak sao da – Jao sao – double Jut Sao – Dum tek – Gum sao da - Jang (elbow)

    15) Pak sao da – Jao sao – double Jut Sao – rear hand Biu gee or rear chung chuie – Gum sao da to any type of follow up

    16) Pak sao da – Jao sao – double Jut Sao – Jong tao (Headbutt) – Sut (knee) – Jang (Elbow) or Gum sao da (Vice versa)

    17) Pak sao da – Jao sao – double Jut Sao – Sut (Knee) – Gum sao da – Jang (Elbow)

    18) Pak sao da – Jao sao – double Jut Sao – Dum loy tek to knee – Gum sao da – Jang (Elbow)

    19) Pak sao da – Jao sao – double Jut Sao – with any combination of headbutt (Jong tao), punch (Chung chuie), knee (Sut), foot stomp (Dum tek), elbow (Jang), Finger jab (Biu gee), any palm strike (Jern), inside stomp kick (Loy dum tek), backhand knifehand (wisk hand), Sut sao / Fak sao etc.

    20) Pak sao da – Go Jao sao da – Ha Jao sao da – Go Jao sao da – double Jut sao – rear hand Biu gee – Gum sao da – Jang (Elbow)

    21) Pak sao da – Go Jao sao da – Ha Jao sao da – Go Jao sao da – double Jut sao - Gum sao da – Jang (Elbow) – to other combination routes

    22) Pak sao da – Go Jao sao da – Ha Jao sao da – pak sao with qua chuie - to other combination routes by energy

    23) Half Pak sao da – Lop sao da – Kao sao da inside of lead arm

    24) Half Pak sao da – Lop sao da – Pak sao when parry hand passes – Pak Lop sao da

    25) Half Pak sao da – Lop sao da – Chung chuie after parry hand passes – Jut Pak sao da – Gum sao da

    26) Half Pak sao da – Lop sao da – Huen sao to rear hand Sut sao – gum sao da

    27) Fake Pak sao da with delay – Chung chuie after parry hand passes – Jut Pak sao da – Gum sao da

    28) Pak sao da – Gnoy Lop sao da – Pak sao da

    29) Pak sao da - Gnoy Lop sao da – Loy Kao sao da

    30) Gnoy woang pak sao da – Gnoy Lop sao da – Gnoy Lop sao da on the rear arm

    31) Half Pak sao da – Lop sao da – Chung chuie behind rear parry – Jut sao da – Gum sao da

    32) Half Pak sao da – Lop sao da - Chung chuie behind rear parry - Pak sao da – Lop sao da – Pak sao da

    33) Half Pak sao da – Lop sao da - Chung chuie behind rear parry - Chung chuie behind returning parry – Gum sao da – Fak sao da – Gum sao da

    34) Choap chuie – Qua chuie – Lop sao with Qua chuie (Rear hand block)

    35) Choap chuie – Qua chuie – Pak sao da – bong sao with Lop sao with Qua chuie or Fak sao (Sut sao) (for lead hand block)

    36) Choap chuie – Qua chuie –Jao sao to all the basics in the Jao sao series

    37) Choap chuie – Qua chuie –Gnoy Lop sao da – Pak sao da

    38) Fake Choap chuie – Fake Qua chuie to :-


    1. Juk tek (Ha, Jung, Go)
    2. O’ou tek (Ha, Jung, Go)
    3. Jik tek (Ha, Jung, Go)
    4. Ha hou O’ou tek
    5. Hou sut
    6. Jung dum tek
    7. Jun juk tek
    8. Jun qua tek
    9. Jun so tek
    10. Jun o’ou tek
    11. Jun jung dum tek
    12. Jun jik tek


    Numbers 1 to 12 are in the Jun Fan Gung Fu Chum Kiu series. The Jun fan Chum Kiu techniques are not to be mistaken for the Wing Chun Chum Kiu techniques. Jun Fan Chum Kiu techniques are “seeking the bridge” or attachment entering techniques or bridging the gap techniques.
     
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  4. Wow!
    Sean Madigan is the man! Thank you so much! No one has broken it down that precise for me yet. I have plenty to play with now!

    Seeker of Truth
     
  5. sweeper

    sweeper Guest

    wow.. I hope you had that in text form already because if not that was a hell of alot of typing. Nice post.
     
  6. Jun Fan Terminology


    Kwoon -- school, gym, institute
    Si-jo -- Founder of the system
    Sifu -- Instructor/teacher
    Si-hing -- your senior
    Si-bak -- Instructor's senior
    Si-Sook -- Instructor's junior
    Si-gung -- Your Instructor's Instructor
    Si-dai -- your junior
    Toe-dai -- student
    Toe-suen -- student's student
    Joap-Hop -- group together
    Yu Bay! -- ready!
    Gin Lai -- salute
    Hay, Hey -- begin
    Bi-jong -- ready stance
    Ha Da -- low hit
    Jung Da -- middle hit
    Go Da -- high hit
    Bil-gee -- finger jab
    Jik Chung -- Straight (vertical) punch
    Gua chuie -- back fist
    Ping chuie -- horizontal fist
    Choap chuie -- knuckle fist
    O'ou chuie -- hooking punch
    Jik chung chuie -- Straight Blast
    Pak sao -- slapping hand
    Lop sao -- grabbing hand
    Jut sao -- jerking hand
    Jao sao -- running hand
    Huen sao -- circleing hand
    Tan sao -- palm up block
    Mon sao -- inquistive hand
    Wu sao -- protecting hand
    Fook sao -- bent arm elbow in block
    Bong sao -- raised elbow deflection
    Doan chi -- single sticking hand
    Chi sao -- sticking hands
    Phon sao -- trapping hands
    Sut -- knee
    Jang -- elbow
    Jeet tek -- stop kick, intercepting kick
    Jik tek -- front or straight kick
    Juk tek -- side kick
    O'ou tek -- hook kick, roundhouse kick
    Hou tek -- back kick
    Juen tek -- spin kick
    So tek -- sweeping kick
    Dum tek -- stomp kick
    Ha so tek -- inverted sweep kick
    Gua tek -- inverted hook kick
    Goang sao -- low outer wrist block
    Ha pak -- low slap cover
    Wong pak -- cross hand slap cover
    Gum sao -- pinning hand
    Sut sao -- chopping hand
     
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  7. Here is some basic information on the Five Ways of Attack as it generally taught.


    SDA - Single Direct Attack - In SDA you simply strike the opponent, Classic examples are the jab and the lead kick. The SDA is the most simple yet the most advanced of the 'ways of attack'

    ABC - Attack By Combination - ABC is a logical extension of SDA in which you throw several attacks in a row, one or more of which may land. Examples are jab-cross-hook and front kick-round kick.

    HIA - Hand Immobilization Attack - In HIA you trap one or more of the opponents limbs as you attack, thus overcoming possible defenses at preventing counterattacks. Examples include pak sao-lop sao or a simple foot trap.

    ABD - Attack By Drawing - In ABD you intentionally leave an opening in your defenses, hoping to draw the opponent into a predictable attack which you may then counter.

    PIA - Progressive Indirect Attack - PIA is often considered the most sophisticated of the five. In it, feint at one or more targets and then attack your real objective without withdrawing the attacking weapon.
     
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  8. KennethKu

    KennethKu 2nd Black Belt

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    Just direct Cantonese translation. Cantonese is one of a bizillion Chinese dialect. Hong Kong residents use Cantonese as their version of Chinese. The official Chinese language is Mandarin Chinese. I would say hardly exclusively JKD. Those terms are generic. :asian:
     
  9. Hi Kenneth,

    I didn't say these terms were exclusive to JKD. These are the terms that are used in "Jun Fan Gung Fu".

    As far as them from Cantonese, well, that makes sense as Bruce Lee was from Hong Kong.

    Have a good day.

    BIG Sean Madigan
     
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  10. arnisador

    arnisador Sr. Grandmaster

    • Martial Talk Alumni
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    It's great to see all this!
     
  11. KennethKu

    KennethKu 2nd Black Belt

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    Yes Sir. You are right. I did not mean to imply that such claim of exclusiness was made . :asian:

    While I am showing off my knowledge in Cantonese, :cuss: :D "Jun Fan Gung Fu" means Chinese American Martial Art. "Jun" refers to China. The Chinese used to think they were the center of the world (which they were at one point, since every empire has its days.) , hence they referred to China as the Middle Kingdom, which the word "JUN" means Middle. "FAN" refers to all the non-Chinese barbarians outside the Middle Kingdom. lol . "Jun Fan Gung Fu" is not traditional Chinese martial art.
     
  12. Original Jun Fan Interactive Focus Mitt Drills
    "1 - 2 Series"​


    · Feeder throws Jab/Cross combination. Student catches jab. Then student Bob/weaves the cross and follows up with hook/cross/hook and any two kicks of their choice.

    · Feeder throws Jab/Cross combination. Student catches jab and throws a rollback/Jeet Tek to deal with cross. Student then follows up with cross/hook/cross and any two kicks of their choice.

    · Feeder throws Jab/Cross combination. Student catches jab and then throws straightlead (cut punch) to deal with cross. Then student follows up with cross/hook/cross and any two kicks of their choice

    · Feeder throws Jab/Cross combination. Student catches jab and then uses a shoulder shop to deal with cross. Then student follows up with cross/hook/cross and any two kicks of their choice

    · Feeder throws Jab/Cross combination. Student catches jab. Then student slips the cross while throwing a cross/with lead hand parry (Split Entry). Student follows up with hook/cross/hook and any two kicks of their choice.

    · Feeder throws Jab/Cross combination. Student catches jab and then uses a Woang Pak Da to deal with cross. Then student follows up with cross/hook/cross and any two kicks of their choice.

    · Feeder throws Jab/Cross combination. Student catches jab and deals with cross with a ‘cover/drop step’. Student then follows up with cross/hook/cross and any two kicks of their choice.

    Note: These drills are done several ways. First they should be done “as is” to learn the correct energy and motions of the drill. Then you must make them alive with both footwork and the proper intensity level.

    You can then add to the drill by making them more interactive. Before each drill, use these methods as well as come up with some of your own:
    · Have a feeder/student jab exchange with the feeder acting as the initiator.
    · Have the student initiate the drill by throwing a jeet tek (or any technique) and the feeder counter the students attack with the start off the drill.




    Original Jun Fan Interactive Focus Mitt Drills
    "1-3 Series"​



    · Feeder Throws Jab/Hook combination. Student catches jab. Then student uses Biu Sau Da to deal with hook. Student then follows up with Cross/Hook/Cross and any two kicks of their choice.

    · Feeder Throws Jab/Hook combination. Student catches jab. Then student uses a Bob/weave against the hook and follows up with Cross/Hook/Cross and any two kicks of their choice.

    · Feeder Throws Jab/Hook combination. Student catches jab and uses shoulder stop to deal with hook. Student then follows up with Cross/Hook/Cross and any two kicks of their choice.

    · Feeder throws Jab/Hook combination. Student catches jab and throws a rollback/Jeet Tek to deal with Hook. Student then follows up with cross/hook/cross and any two kicks of their choice

    · Feeder throws Jab/Hook combination. Student catches jab and deals with hook with a ‘cover/drop step’. Student then follows up with hook/cross/hook and any two kicks of their choice

    Note: These drills are done several ways. First they should be done “as is” to learn the correct energy and motions of the drill. Then you must make them alive with both footwork and the proper intensity level.

    You can then add to the drill by making them more interactive. Before each drill, use these methods as well as come up with some of your own:
    · Have a feeder/student jab exchange with the feeder acting as the initiator.
    · Have the student initiate the drill by throwing a jeet tek (or any technique) and the feeder counter the students attack with the start off the drill.
     
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  13. · Jab – Cross
    · Jab – Cross - Straightlead
    · Jab - Cross - Lead hook
    · Jab - Cross - Lead uppercut
    · Jab - Lead Hook to body - Lead hook to head
    · Jab - Lead hook - Cross
    · Double jab - lead hook
    · Cross - Hook - Cross
    · Hook - Cross - Hook
    · Lead hook - Rear cross - Lead uppercut
    · Lead uppercut - Rear uppercut - Lead hook
    · Cross - Lead hook - Lead Backfist
    · Overhand – Uppercut - Overhand
     
  14. Here is some basic, "JKD" Footwork.

    • Step & Slide - From the Bi-jong, take a smal step with your lead foot, no more then a few inches. Once that is completed, slide your rear foot the same distance forward. This step is used as an adjustment, and not really for an attack.
    • Slide Step - From the Bi-jong, slide your rear foot until it meets your lead foot, as this happens, step forward with your lead foot so that you end up back in the bi-jong. For a Slide step backwards, slide your lead foot so that it meets your rear, and then step with your rear foot to regain bi-jong.
    • Push Shuffle - From the bi-jong, push forward off of your rear foot while slightly lifting the lead foot. This is an attacking footwork.
    • Side Step - Think push shuffle to either side. Some use the Step & Slide as well. The important thing here is to make sure that you do not cross your legs at any time.
    • Pendulum Step - The easiest way for me to explain this in writing is have you connect to slide steps...one going forward, and then immediately followed up by a slide step back. So, from the bi-jong, slide your rear foot to kick out your lead foot (into say a lead kick) and then quickly bring your lead foot back to meet your rear foot, kicking it out and replacing it.
    • Quick Advance - From the bi-jong, take a step with your lead foot (as you would with a step & slide) and then, go right into a Slide Step.
     
  15. sweeper

    sweeper Guest

    one question I have, I have heard alot of people refer to jun fan gung fu as bruce lee's style of fighting from a certain period of time, and others refer to it as a set of techniques for JFJKD (in other words it doesn't realy matter when they are from, they are the physical extrapolation of JFJKD).

    within the JFJKD community how is the term used?
     
  16. KumaSan

    KumaSan Blue Belt

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    My very rough (that means keep reading) understanding (as incomplete as it is) is that Jun Fan Kung Fu (or Gung Fu) was Bruce Lee's personal expression of martial arts before Jeet Kune Do sprang into being. So to the best of my knowledge, JFJKD means Jun Fan fighting techniques applied with Jeet Kune Do philosophy.

    My only other advice is listen to BIG Sean Madigan. He knows what he's talking about.
     
  17. sweeper

    sweeper Guest

    well that's the question, people who teach JFJKD teach everything, so it seems that the era it as from wouldn't realy matter and that distinction wouldn't be there.. but than again we all know what is said about assumptions.
     
  18. Cthulhu

    Cthulhu Senior Master

    • Founding Member
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    Jun Fan Gung Fu is simply the gung fu taught by Lee Jun Fan, Bruce Lee by his Cantonese name.

    Cthulhu
     
  19. Hi,

    I've put together an "E-book" (about 35 pages) that contains lots of information on Original Jeet Kune Do. If you are interested in it, let me know. I sell it for $10.

    The "E-Book" has descriptions for over 30 drills, lists many techniques and has four different sets of Trapping Progressions. It also contains a step by step list of Sil Lim Tau (1st form of Wing Chun) as well as Wing Chun's first 7 mook jong sets.

    My e-mail address is: Straightlead@yahoo.com

    All the best,

    BIG Sean Madigan
     
  20. Flatlander

    Flatlander Grandmaster

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    Thanks to the previous posters for this incredible resource. Consider this thread stickied.

    -Dan-
     

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