First class, what to expect?

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by Void06, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. Void06

    Void06 White Belt

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    Hello everyone. My name is Jim and I've been eager to get started with my training for some time now.

    I always do my homework before a make a decision like this, and I looked long and far for a school offering both Judo and BJJ as well as a MMA curriculum as a whole. I've found it in a school associated with American Top Team.

    Tonight I am going to my first BJJ class (!) and I'm very, VERY excited.


    I know this has to be the most cliche thread/question on the forums but here I am asking again:
    What should I expect tonight and what kind of questions should I ask the professor?
     
  2. sempai little1

    sempai little1 Yellow Belt

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    I teach Karate so there may be some differences, but I will try to ease your nerve somewhat.

    Likely you will learn some dojo (training hall) rules. Learn what you should call your instructors. My school the big boss is Sensei, all the black belts are called Sempai, hence my name Sempai Little1. I am the smallest adult BB in our school. Highest ranked Sempai, Lowest eye level.
    You will learn your first basic moves, don't expect to be doing much break falls or tosses just yet.
    You may want to introduce yourself to the other students and learn the dynamic of the school. Some schools are very strick, some schools have students refering to their instructor as Sempai Little1.
    I am a stickler for the rules, some BB don't worry quite so much, be sure you understand your instructors expectations for the class.

    The number one thing I tell my students is that this should be enjoyable. If you begin to dislike the sport come and see me and we will try and find the passion again. Find the instructor who feels the same way I do, it will make your training more enjoyable to have someone to talk to if you have trouble.

    Good luck tonight
    Your friend,
    Sempai Little1 :wavey:
     
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  3. terryl965

    terryl965 <center><font size="2"><B>Martial Talk Ultimate<BR

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    Have a great day and train hard.
     
  4. arnisador

    arnisador Sr. Grandmaster

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    In BJJ? Every instructor is different, but a typical class involves learning a small number of related moves (teacher demos a lock--you practice it--teacher demo a counter to the lock--you practice it--teacher demos a follow-up move to try if that counter is used against you--you practice it), usually on the ground and practiced with mild resistance, then having grappling practice for a good section of the class (at least a quarter of it, maybe a half). Often the grappling will be within constraints--start from the knees, or start with one person on his back and the other on top of him, or only use sweeps--a problem-solving thing. You'd likely be told to just watch the grappling portion fo a couple of days, or to go with someone who will take it very easy on you.

    Expect to be on the losing end of things for about a year unless you have a strong grapling background already! It takes that long to get the feel of it.
     
  5. Touch Of Death

    Touch Of Death Sr. Grandmaster

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    Just remember that your basic goal is to keep your elbows and knees between you and your opponent. He will do passes and you will learn counters to the passes.
    Sean
     
  6. Void06

    Void06 White Belt

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    First of all THANKS to everyone who responded.

    I ended up going to two classes and two separate gyms two days in a row. A little more than I expected but it was great to see two different approaches to training.




    The first gym I went to had about 8 guys for this class. At least 4 or 5 were new or newer students. The class started with some stretching and then the instructor demonstrated a basic armbar technique from the guard.
    We all practiced the armbar for a good 10-15 minutes then we did the same for guard escape and armbar defense.

    Overall the class was pretty casual and the instructor seemed to very knowledgeable. The space was small but big enough to practice in.

    Class is $125 a month.




    So I was pretty excited about that class so today after I went to the gym (non MA gym, planet fitness) I went to another school in New Haven to get some information. Turns out they run no-gi BJJ from 12:30-2:00 and I showed up at... you guessed it 12:30.



    So even though I was very sore and tired from the class from last night and the gym earlier today, I decided to participate in a class. Besides myself, there was a woman training outside of the class in the gym and 5 others in the gym with me. We started off by running and stretching and then some calisthenics.

    The owner/Sensei of this gym does not speak english, he is Brazilian and he had one of the more advanced students speaking for him. The owner mainly watched as me and another new student practiced armbars on each other. "10!" the instructor told us not to take long breaks but to keep rolling and keep trying the same technique over and over. He clearly has a very strong work ethic and he wants everyone to keep going.

    Then he had us pair up and roll. I did so even though all I know at this point is an armbar from bottom position and a guard escape. My opponents were both very skilled and took it easy on me at first but once we started things started getting really fun. I have decent defense I suppose but I was unable to avoid an armbar, and an arm triangle as well as a full triangle.

    This gym is $135 a month but they have a much bigger space, ample training equipment, but most importantly the skill level was very very high.



    So I'm a little torn right now. Should I try out a few more classes? Discipline and a really passionate teacher are very important to me. I'm not a fan of the more casual atmospheres in classes.

    If I had to pick a gym for now it would be the Araujo gym in New Haven. I had a friend who trained there briefly and he said there were multiple blackbelts. This gym is geared heavily towards competition, which is a huge plus in my book. However, the closer gym (American Martial Arts) is associated with American Top Team.

    I think I'm going to keep looking, however, because I may want to learn a standup style first before I enter the world of BJJ. Right now I would really prefer to learn Judo more than anything. Both gyms say they have Judo classes as well as BJJ but I didn't ask much about the Judo. I think I'd like to look for a local Judo-only or highly Judo-oriented gym before I learn BJJ.


    Help!
     
  7. arnisador

    arnisador Sr. Grandmaster

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    In BJJ, more rolling is better, and "keep trying the same technique" is good advice for a beginner. Go with your gut!
     
  8. young.learner

    young.learner White Belt

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    I am going to have my first class soon too... although lua is my passion... did you know lua is one of the easiest martial arts? well that doesnt mean its easy... i have had a hard time learning it myself. but always be respectful to your sensei because in karate,judo,ect. you must be respectful and diciplined no matter what age or rank you are at.
    and be sure to have fun with it : )


    ----------------------:yinyang:--------------------
    there is no emotion,

    there is peace,

    there is no ignorance,

    there is knowledge,

    there is no passion,

    there is serenity,

    there is no death,

    you will live on in peace
     
  9. arnisador

    arnisador Sr. Grandmaster

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    Lua is hard to find!
     
  10. AnglingBoi

    AnglingBoi White Belt

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    awesome information, thanks guys. i was trained unprofessionally in kung fu. wish i could learn for free, from a sifu of course :)
     
  11. jks9199

    jks9199 Administrator Staff Member

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    What do you mean "trained unprofessionally?"
     

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