Budo Ryu Ninjutsu Dojo - September 2010 Keiko

Discussion in 'JMA Video Library' started by Bob Hubbard, Oct 9, 2010.

  1. Bob Hubbard

    Bob Hubbard Retired

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    [yt]J7yv01JGsxg[/yt]

     
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  2. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker Grandmaster

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    Hmm, "Budo Ryu" a Japanese art? Not sure about that... While Christa Jacobson has had some training in the Bujinkan, and then in Toshindo, this is not that. This is the more, uh, illegitimate side of things from her. But we'll try to be constructive and objective, shall we? Let's see how it goes (taking it piece by piece)....

    We'll start with the name, as this has always bugged me. "Budo Ryu". Written, as one can see at 0:04, with the kanji as expected for "martial" (Bu) "way", or "path" (do), and "style", or "flow" (ryu), although I feel they think it means "school". So their martial art is called martial art style? Although it's Japanese, I highly doubt any Japanese martial artist would name a system that way. This is followed at 0:05 by a page telling us that "Keiko" means "Training in the correct spirit". No, it just means "practice", or "training".

    The blurb then goes on to say that this school is a "traditional school of Japanese martial arts that trains in 7 old warrior traditions." We'll examine that a little more closely as we go through the clip. But for now, let's look at the systems presented:

    Tomo Ryu Shinobi-jutsu. This is an art that has no records, no Japanese association, and no existence before Christa coming forward as Soke and An-shu (a term taken from Steve Hayes) of the school.

    Tenjin Ryu Jujutsu. Can't find any record of this existing either. Tenjin Shinyo Ryu was one of the two primary source schools for Judo, but Tenjin Ryu doesn't seem to exist.

    Eishin Ryu Iaijutsu. This seems to be a shortening of the full name of Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu Iaijutsu, not sure of Christa's training in it, but it doesn't seem too be that substantial.

    Koka Ryu Kenpo (Dakentaijutsu). Really? Koka/Koga Ryu? And the evidence is.....?

    Togakure Ryu, Koto Ryu, Gyokko Ryu, all taken from her training in Bujinkan and Toshindo.

    Now to the clip itself....

    Okay, you may have noticed that I'm being rather picky here, and it's going to continue. First technique is at 0:13, and is a defence against a very non-Japanese attack (at least, not a traditional one at any rate!), being a jab/right cross combination. The responce is two palm deflections, a hit to the stomach, an elbow across the head, and a following upper-cut-style punch. All in all, the defender has no real balance (almost falling over at the end!), and there is little to recommend. Now, the reason I have focused on it not being traditional or Japanese is that this is supposed to be demonstrating one of these "old systems", the Koka Ryu Kenpo system. And it fails the authenticity test straight away.

    Next we get some shots of someone hitting focus pads (modern training), and some throwing. The throws are done again with little balance, unnecessarily putting themselves out of position, and would simply not be done by an old Japanese system that way, especially if that system is supposed to date from a time of armour. There is also a little sparring included, and if you watch at about 0:48, a low roundhouse kick is thrown.... if this is based only in old systems, where did that come from? The roundhouse was only introduced into Japanese Karate in the 30's by Gichin Funakoshi's son. Again, failing the authenticity test.


    Oh dear. 0:58. Uh, what? Okay, applying a wrist-lock to someone trying to take your sword is fine (Bokuden Ryu Koshi no Mawari Daisho Sabaki, for instance), but the rest of this is terrible! And what was that grip on the sword at the end? Did he really think that was an effective cut? Can he move from being that deep in his posture there? Hmm.

    1:04 features some more modern training methods, nothing like anything seen in any traditional Japanese system whatsoever. Authenticity is looking less and less positive.

    You know what, I'm going to leave over all the rest of the bad swordsmanship, modern striking and kicking methods, lack of Japanese feel to most of it (other than some window-dressing), and just skip straight to 1:26 - the Stick Fighting. Now, if anyone thinks they can state which of the 7 old traditions this comes from, let me know! I'm racking my brain to think of anything really close to this in Japanese arts! The knife fighting following it is also not Japanese in any way, so you know. Same goes for the ground fighting.

    Now, if someone enjoys their training there, great. But they shouldn't think it's a Japanese system, as it is completely removed from that. There is a tiny piece of Japanese make-up to it, but it has been almost completely abandoned.
     
  3. Tanaka

    Tanaka Purple Belt

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    As far as I know, that type of ground fighting started with Judo. I would like to know which traditional Japanese system was doing it before Judo.
     
  4. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker Grandmaster

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    None that I know of. I know of a few traditions that include some basic actions on the ground (from seiza, for example, or methods of getting up or evading injury if you end up on the ground in armour). This form of ground fighting is primarily competitive, rather than survivalist or combative, so they really don't have any place in what the group describes their make-up as being.
     
  5. Tanaka

    Tanaka Purple Belt

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    Yeah most of the ground work is done from at a kneeling position with the opponent on the ground. As far as I know.
     
  6. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker Grandmaster

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    Most "ground work" in classical systems is from a kneeling, or seated position. This is alternately known as Suwari waza (in the majority of cases, including Aikido), Idori Waza (such as in Asayama Ichiden Ryu), or even Iai Waza (such as in Katayama Hoki Ryu). Most often starting from seiza, or something similar, some variants will begin in a form of half-kneel, typically refered to as Tate Hiza (shielding knee). There are some that have some techniques from a more "prone" position, such as Bokuden Ryu Koshi no Mawari Jujutsu, or Koden Enshin Ryu Kenden Kumiuchi, but these are really last ditch efforts if you find yourself having fallen or being taken to ground against an armed opponent. This is not the case with the above clip.
     
  7. Kajowaraku

    Kajowaraku Green Belt

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    It does seem to be a classical case of old school bussinessplanning. Okane-ryu Ninjutsu as it were.

    [note: I am not saying it's fraudelent, just that it is based on a proper bussinessplan.]

    Real ninjutsu sells better than something I can't say out loud due to specific forum regulations regarding the contestation of legitemacy of others' claims. Also somewhat easier to become grandmaster that way.

    Ah well, I wish them all the best all the same. Entertaining vid though. Spotted some jeet kun do, escrima stick and knifework. All in all it reminds me a bit of the style of Guru Innosanto, but without the commitment Guru seems to require from his pupils.

    On that note, perhaps it is classical afterall! I guess christa has just got a map of empirial Japan from 1943 :). Somebody ought to inform her she needs a new one.

    Some people are truly entertaining.
     

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