New Careers.

DennisBreene

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I've just survived the first 2 weeks of six months of lutherie school (specifically guitar building). They are working my but off, but I love it. I'm hoping to have a small business when this is all done, or at least an advanced hobby. Anyone else out there embarking on a second (or third) career.View attachment $IMG_0213.jpgView attachment $IMG_0224.jpgView attachment $IMG_0234.jpgView attachment $IMG_0236.jpg Bryan Galloup, the master luthier who started the school is the gentleman in the orange shirt. Sorry for the off kilter orientation of the photos. Please tip your monitors on their sides :)
 

Dirty Dog

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Pretty cool.
I'd like to make a living diving, but that's not going to happen so it will stay a hobby.
I actually wouldn't want to be a full time MA instructor. I enjoy teaching through the YMCA program, where there is zero concern for profitability.
 

Sukerkin

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:grins: I am presently in my third (or fourth, depending on what you count) career. I am indeed considering whether I have it in me to change again. For, important in the infrastructural scheme of themes as it may be, the glorified data shuffling and restructuring that is my daily lot in life seems purposeless and unfulfilling now.

There are reasons for that ennui that those here who know me will understand well and I have to ponder whether switching careers would really benefit my 'soul' at the expense of my finances or whether I should just ride it out until I come to my senses?
 

granfire

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when my mom retired from the health care business, she went to school to become a weaver.
When life does not interfere too much, she makes some awfully nice stuff.

I am considering to switch from gardening to leather working/saddlery....
 

Carol

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I just became a trail steward on one of the most frequently-hiked mountains in the world. I work my real job Monday through Friday then Saturday and Sunday I am out on the mountain.

The trail work is volunteer, so it is not another career per se, but I would love to be able to parlay the experience in to something that could bring extra income, such as writing a book or teaching a class.

However, even if I do not find an avenue for revenue, I get to be out on the trail, help the park, and get a great functional strength workout. That is a win/win/win :)

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
 

arnisador

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When I retire, that's going to be it--just sitting on a couch. I've only ever done one thing (post college) and that works for me!
 
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DennisBreene

DennisBreene

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:grins: I am presently in my third (or fourth, depending on what you count) career. I am indeed considering whether I have it in me to change again. For, important in the infrastructural scheme of themes as it may be, the glorified data shuffling and restructuring that is my daily lot in life seems purposeless and unfulfilling now.

There are reasons for that ennui that those here who know me will understand well and I have to ponder whether switching careers would really benefit my 'soul' at the expense of my finances or whether I should just ride it out until I come to my senses?
Do you have an alternative career in mind?
 
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DennisBreene

DennisBreene

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When I retire, that's going to be it--just sitting on a couch. I've only ever done one thing (post college) and that works for me!

I've known many successful couch potatoes in my time.
 

Flying Crane

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:grins: I am presently in my third (or fourth, depending on what you count) career. I am indeed considering whether I have it in me to change again. For, important in the infrastructural scheme of themes as it may be, the glorified data shuffling and restructuring that is my daily lot in life seems purposeless and unfulfilling now.

There are reasons for that ennui that those here who know me will understand well and I have to ponder whether switching careers would really benefit my 'soul' at the expense of my finances or whether I should just ride it out until I come to my senses?

aye, that is the question that I ask myself on a daily basis. I feel like every day I go to the office, a piece of my soul dies. Trying to figure out what would make me happier to do, while not completely disrupting my financial situation... grrrr....
 
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DennisBreene

DennisBreene

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aye, that is the question that I ask myself on a daily basis. I feel like every day I go to the office, a piece of my soul dies. Trying to figure out what would make me happier to do, while not completely disrupting my financial situation... grrrr....

In many ways the decision was easy. I had to retire on disability so my financial situation was already disrupted, and I had been working toward this goal as a hobby. I was just able to accelerate the learning curve with formal training.
 

Xue Sheng

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aye, that is the question that I ask myself on a daily basis. I feel like every day I go to the office, a piece of my soul dies. Trying to figure out what would make me happier to do, while not completely disrupting my financial situation... grrrr....

That is where I am.

Technically I am on my 3rd career but I too am at the point where every day I go to the office, a piece of my soul dies...actually of late it has been large pieces.

I am currently working on a kinda sorta 4th career but it is just taking a small part of what I already do and making it what I do most of the time in another office, this multi-tasking vastly different tasks is not helping the soul any.

It is that 5th one I need to figure out... and I am honestly trying to figure it out.
 

Sukerkin

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For me, somewhat like Dennis, I have a long extant hankering to make things, or build them, or grow them ... do something productive that I can look at with pride and know I made it. Something other than make millions of Pounds for someone else off the back of my knowledge and time spent creating that something that is, in essence, unseen.

I know I can take some form of pride in the fact that when people and businesses need electricity then they have it in at least some part due to my work but that is not the same satisfaction as having something tactile and beautiful in your hands that you crafted yourself.
 
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DennisBreene

DennisBreene

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For me, somewhat like Dennis, I have a long extant hankering to make things, or build them, or grow them ... do something productive that I can look at with pride and know I made it. Something other than make millions of Pounds for someone else off the back of my knowledge and time spent creating that something that is, in essence, unseen.

I know I can take some form of pride in the fact that when people and businesses need electricity then they have it in at least some part due to my work but that is not the same satisfaction as having something tactile and beautiful in your hands that you crafted yourself.

Thank you Mark, you hit precisely the attraction for me. I know that I have done many good works for my patients and I take a great deal of pride and satisfaction in that work. But sadly, my work passes away with my patient, and is therefore a fleeting event. Any guitars I produce will last beyond me and leave a little something of me for the future. I realize there is a certain narcissism in that, but I'll take the criticism for the chance to create a little lasting beauty.
 

Carol

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For me, somewhat like Dennis, I have a long extant hankering to make things, or build them, or grow them ... do something productive that I can look at with pride and know I made it. Something other than make millions of Pounds for someone else off the back of my knowledge and time spent creating that something that is, in essence, unseen.

I know I can take some form of pride in the fact that when people and businesses need electricity then they have it in at least some part due to my work but that is not the same satisfaction as having something tactile and beautiful in your hands that you crafted yourself.

Aye, you should take pride in that, Mark, as its much more than businesses that need electricity. Hospitals, charities, families, we all need it and use it. Lives depend on it. Heck, WE wouldn't be here (as an MT community) without it :asian:

That being said, I do agree about the satisfaction of making something that you created. When I was in my 20s and working in broadcasting, I had to do a lot more "handiwork". Soldering, wiring, punching, drilling...lots of work involving tools. However as much as it offered a sense of satisfaction, it also offered elements of frustration. Sloppy work was not acceptable, so many times I was too slow or too cautious or too clumsy.

But doing trail work...I've fallen in love with the joy of creation again. Even though I'm not creating something tangible, I'm creating something that other people will enjoy...with the added benefit of trade pressure not being there. Naturally I have standards to follow and commitments to uphold (I have to keep my word), but no one cares that it takes me 4 hours to do something someone else can do in 3, they're thrilled I did the job and did it right.

I guess what I'm taking a long time to say is....the beauty of craftsmanship is like the beauty of music. You don't have to be a professional to enjoy doing it. You could be, but it could also be something you enjoy as side work, as a volunteer, or as a hobby...there are so many possibilities :) :)
 
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DennisBreene

DennisBreene

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Aye, you should take pride in that, Mark, as its much more than businesses that need electricity. Hospitals, charities, families, we all need it and use it. Lives depend on it. Heck, WE wouldn't be here (as an MT community) without it :asian:

That being said, I do agree about the satisfaction of making something that you created. When I was in my 20s and working in broadcasting, I had to do a lot more "handiwork". Soldering, wiring, punching, drilling...lots of work involving tools. However as much as it offered a sense of satisfaction, it also offered elements of frustration. Sloppy work was not acceptable, so many times I was too slow or too cautious or too clumsy.

But doing trail work...I've fallen in love with the joy of creation again. Even though I'm not creating something tangible, I'm creating something that other people will enjoy...with the added benefit of trade pressure not being there. Naturally I have standards to follow and commitments to uphold (I have to keep my word), but no one cares that it takes me 4 hours to do something someone else can do in 3, they're thrilled I did the job and did it right.

I guess what I'm taking a long time to say is....the beauty of craftsmanship is like the beauty of music. You don't have to be a professional to enjoy doing it. You could be, but it could also be something you enjoy as side work, as a volunteer, or as a hobby...there are so many possibilities :) :)

Exactly so, and I find it exciting when I hear of others who take a leap and indulge that passion, either as a hobby or as a career. Stagnation is slow death.
 
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Manseau

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:grins: I am presently in my third (or fourth, depending on what you count) career. I am indeed considering whether I have it in me to change again. For, important in the infrastructural scheme of themes as it may be, the glorified data shuffling and restructuring that is my daily lot in life seems purposeless and unfulfilling now.

There are reasons for that ennui that those here who know me will understand well and I have to ponder whether switching careers would really benefit my 'soul' at the expense of my finances or whether I should just ride it out until I come to my senses?
I retired in 2004 from the electrical industry to help my wife as caregiver for her mom, she passed away in 06. A no compete clause prevented me from taking another position in the industry so I went back to school and did volunteer work for "Free Geek". Both of my boys were still in college so I got a job with the US Census to help pay for their tuition. The Census job ended and at 62 I got a job with an armored car company. My youngest is tuition free and graduates in a few weeks. My second son graduated and is working full time(almost tuition free). Required skill has slipped with each new endeavor but sometimes job satisfaction has nothing to do with the job. I've been able to spend a lot of good time with my family, give my boys every thing they need to build a life for them selves and that is really about all the job satisfaction I need. Good luck to each of you. I think the answer is different for all of us. Regards, David
 
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DennisBreene

DennisBreene

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I retired in 2004 from the electrical industry to help my wife as caregiver for her mom, she passed away in 06. A no compete clause prevented me from taking another position in the industry so I went back to school and did volunteer work for "Free Geek". Both of my boys were still in college so I got a job with the US Census to help pay for their tuition. The Census job ended and at 62 I got a job with an armored car company. My youngest is tuition free and graduates in a few weeks. My second son graduated and is working full time(almost tuition free). Required skill has slipped with each new endeavor but sometimes job satisfaction has nothing to do with the job. I've been able to spend a lot of good time with my family, give my boys every thing they need to build a life for them selves and that is really about all the job satisfaction I need. Good luck to each of you. I think the answer is different for all of us. Regards, David
David, Thank you for the inspiration. Second careers aren't always (or typically?) initiated out of pure desire. There usually seems to be a loss involved in the first career. Surviving that loss and finding a way to move on is a necessary part of survival. We are truly lucky when the process of moving on leads us to something that inspires us and fulfills us.
 

ballen0351

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I feel bad for you guys that hate your jobs. I really like mine most days. I do need to start planning on what I want to do next. Ive got plenty of time to figure it out. My problem is I like too many things.
 
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DennisBreene

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I feel bad for you guys that hate your jobs. I really like mine most days. I do need to start planning on what I want to do next. Ive got plenty of time to figure it out. My problem is I like too many things.

That can be a terrible cross to bear. But it is a nice feeling to get up looking forward to the day.
 

shesulsa

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Just got a job in home mortgage loss mitigation; specifically, we review mortgages people are having trouble paying and see if we can still profitably re-finance them so they can stay in their homes. I'm not so sure that I hate the job or the company I work for as the processes are so complicated and the tools we use break down half the time or only partly work. Training is hard to come by and it is very fly-by-the-seat-of-one's-pants in gaining access to programs and obtaining work tools. Underwriting seems attractive to me, though even higher pressure than this job (about the only difference between what I do and what an underwriter does is I don't give the approval/denial stamp and I don't attend mediations). Trying to brush up on my math so I can go back for my biology degree.
 
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