does anyone study this style of WC?

drummingman

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does anyone study the fu kien style of wing chun? if so what do you think of it? and what are the main differences between fu kien wing chun and IP man and foshan wing chun?
there is a guy in my area that teaches the fu kien style of wing chun ( he also has studied vikoga wing chun, malaysia wing chun, nan yang wing chun, vietnam wing chun and foshan wing chun). thats a lot of styles of wing chun, but i guess his main style that he teachers is fu kien.
 

qwksilver61

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Whatever the origin,I for one do not believe that we will ever conclude the origin of Wing Chun.Stories of Lim Lom air monkey or flying monkey,similarities on the border of Szechuan? Fujhien?
sure,but what is the resultant? Wing Tsun that works.
 

geezer

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Whatever the origin,I for one do not believe that we will ever conclude the origin of Wing Chun.Stories of Lim Lom air monkey or flying monkey,similarities on the border of Szechuan? Fujhien?
sure,but what is the resultant? Wing Tsun that works.

I agree. The history prior to Dr. Leung Jan will never be resolved. The legends about Gee Shin, Ng Mui, Yim Wing Tsun, and so forth, encapsulate the identity and philosophy of the system. For example, consider the story of how Ng Mui supposedly conceived a new system that could beat the complexity and power of Shaolin through simplicity, efficiency, economy of motion and borrowing your opponent's force. Or consider the story of Yim Wing Tsun, a slightly built young woman who was able to assimilate this system in a short time and defeat the strong bully who was harrassing her. These stories are both historically very dubious, but they vividly illustrate the martial paradigm that underlies our style. Related systems such as the Weng Chun style assert their identity with a separate origin myth--that of the Weng Chun Hall of Shaolin. The stories are fascinating, but as you said, what really matters is what works. That's why we need the rebels--the Emins and others. They break new ground, test the art and move it forward. Personally, I am grateful that there are many branches of our art. I don't know anything about the Fukien branch that drummingman speaks of, but it would be fun to find out more.
 

qwksilver61

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It will definitely keep you busy or drive you nuts,I am doing a bit of my own research into the roots of Wing Chun.I'm particularly interested in this Ling Lom or flying monkey style,again roots on the border of Fujien.???????
 

geezer

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It will definitely keep you busy or drive you nuts,I am doing a bit of my own research into the roots of Wing Chun.I'm particularly interested in this Ling Lom or flying monkey style,again roots on the border of Fujien.???????

I first heard of the possible connection between Wing Tsun and the little known Thai style of "Ling Lom" or "Flying Monkey" from Dr. Leung Ting way back in the mid '80s. He said that he had seen it demonstrated for him by the Muay Thai champion Sunthus Supasterpong. Mr. Supasterpong had apparently been instructed in this "private" system separately from his Muay Thai training. According to Dr. Leung, many of the movements were very different from the well known Thai martial arts and bore a striking resemblence to Wing Tsun. This included sections of forms, leg sets and so on. Dr. Leung felt that there must have been an historical connection and hypothesized that perhaps the legendary wanderings of the buddhist nun Ng Mui to Mount Tai Leung in the direction of the Chinese-Thai border might have had a basis in fact. Or, at the very least, some early Chinese merchants may have carried knowledge of Wing Tsun, or one of its close variants, along the ancient trade routes to Thailand. However, another man who was present at the same seminar, a widely travelled martial artist from Venezuela, confided in me that some of the similarities Dr. Leung demonstrated for us were actually part of various traditional Thai boxing salutations, and were not really such a surprising parallel to Wing Tsun when understood in context. I know Dr. Leung has since elaborated on this in his book, Roots and Branches of Wing Tsun. But the facts remain sketchy. For more information, you'd probably have to track down Master Supasterpong, since even among Thai boxers, Ling Lom is a very rare art.
 
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