Dan Gable Wrestling Clinic

J

JDenz

Guest
You heard it right, the legendary wrestler and coach Dan Gable will be hosting a FREE wrestling clinic this Sunday, Dec. 1, at the Rhode Island College Gym in Providence, RI.

Don't worry about not being eligible: this clinic is open to ANY youth, junior high, high school, or college wrestler, coach, parent, or even just a plain old 'wrestling enthusiast,' as the clinic's announcement states.

It all takes place this Sunday, December 1, from 9:00 AM to 12:00 noon. Doors open at 8:30 AM.

And in case you forgot the cost, it is: FREE! FREE! FREE!

The clinic is being sponsored in part by the Rhode Island Wrestling Association (RIWA), the Rhode Island Wrestling Coaches Association (RIWCA), the Rhode Island College Wrestling program, and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Its purpose is: 'To help save Olympic and collegiate wrestling by providing awareness about Title IX and its effects on scholastic sports.'

There will be autographed T-shirts for sale after the clinic.
 
OP
J

JDenz

Guest
I would imgine since it costs between 5-10 thousand dollars to get Dan to come do a seminor Ya that would be the angle they arn't going to make that much in tee shirt sales
 

ace

Master of Arts
Joined
May 26, 2002
Messages
1,573
Reaction score
16
Location
N.Y.
Could We Make it There & Back in A day???????????
 
OP
J

JDenz

Guest
We would have to leave early on Friday I think Primo and spend a night in a hotel to be there that early if you are interested in wrestling seminor They are alot cheaper then martial art ones at least. I mean a D-1 level coaching seminor is probley abot 60 bucksa person and they have them 2 or three times a year locally. There was just a pretty decent one at Niagra Falls two weeks ago but I didn't find out about it till that day and by then it was to late to call you guys.
 
OP
J

JDenz

Guest
I don't know If I will be walking or not by then Or I would say I would go no doubt.
 
OP
J

JDenz

Guest
A TALK WITH DAN GABLE DURING THE NCAA WRESTLING FINALS
Submitted by: Eddie Goldman/ADCC Wrestling Editor
Posted On 04/01/2003

It was too much to resist, and too good of a story to pass up, so I went over a couple of seats on press row to speak to wrestling legend Dan Gable during the finals of the 2003 NCAA Div. I Wrestling Championships, March 22 at Kemper Arena in Kansas City, MO. At 149 pounds, Eric Larkin of Arizona State was on his way to defeating Jared Lawrence of Minnesota, 10-8, and to earning not only his first national championship, but the award for Outstanding Wrestler of the entire tournament as well.

How do these champion wrestlers compare to those in your day? I asked him. Gable collected his thoughts, and offered the following: 'People are people. It's just a matter of opportunities to learn, to expand, to become better athletes. Today's day and age has a better opportunity because there's more out there in everything. I mean, look at the war. We can see what's going on in the war. So I really feel that between, as far as who could be the most disciplined, probably the guys earlier on. But yet opportunity to be better in something is more now. So there's more distractions, but you kind of equal it out. So I would take old-timers against new-times, and I think it would be a heck of a match. I don't really think there's that much difference that way, except you better be a better wrestler today than you were back then.'

I also asked him his reaction to the victory at 125 by Travis Lee of Cornell. Lee is the first wrestler from Hawaii to win a national championship, and one of the few from an Ivy League school.

'I love that,' replied Gable. 'Because kids then feel like they have more places to go. Yet we're losing too many colleges, but yet they don't have to just think they can go here. They can actually go a place they may want to go, and accomplish both academically and athletically. And that's important.'

There is an electricity, an excitement that makes the NCAA's a very special event. Gable also gave his thoughts on why this is so.

'What really makes it special is when the athletes perform,' he observed. 'When they're out there, both guys thinking they can win, and they have great matches. So far, the finals have been almost that way. And that makes for great viewing, makes for great promotion of our sport. It's obviously on TV, the finals. And so we can actually promote this to a higher level because that's where we got to go. We got to go to a higher level. Because there's a lot of people out there that are pushing what they want on their agendas. And we got to make sure everybody knows that we have a good agenda already. We have a good product. But we're looking even to improve it.'

Another feature of the 2003 NCAA's was the series of victories by freshmen. Later, I asked him about this right after the championship performance by Oklahoma State's redshirt freshman Jake Rosholt at 184. He had lost to his opponent, Scott Barker of Missouri, 9-1 in the Big 12 finals two weeks earlier, but then defeated Barker in the NCAA finals by a 13-5 major decision.

'It's all the frame of mentality. You don't know when you're going to get it,' explained Gable. 'I coached this little kid to a national title in my last year, Jessie Whitmer,' referring to the 118-pounds senior Whitmer, who had never even been an All-American until he won his sole national championship in 1997, Gable's last season as coach.

'He didn't get that mentality until halfway through the tournament, three-quarters of the way through the tournament,' continued Gable. 'And I'm sure this Jake Rosholt developed that mentality. He's probably had it before at one time. But you lose it, and then all of a sudden you pick it back up for some reason right during the tournament. It makes you look good as a coach, but the bottom line is, you don't know when it's going to happen. And it happened right here, and that's what counts.'

I commented that while Rosholt unexpectedly went to the finals and won, higher-ranked wrestlers at Oklahoma State, which won the 2003 team title, such as 197-pounder Muhammed Lawal, 174-pounder Chris Pendleton, and 165-pounder Tyrone Lewis, did not go to finals. Lawal and Pendleton each finished third, while Lewis finished fifth.

'It's just all of a sudden the kid realized he could do it,' Gable said of Rosholt's surprise win. 'There's a lot of them out there. Even if you look at John Smith and Michael Jordan, they were great. But they weren't superstars. And then all of a sudden they became superstars.'

-- Eddie Goldman, wrestlingeditor@yahoo.com
 
Top