Attacks Vs Fist Fights & Posturing - by Richard Clear

ben

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What Constitutes an Attack

In the Martial Arts you hear and read about people who have used their Martial Art to physically defend themselves in a real situation. Often the defender could very easily have avoided the entire situation but instead due to any number of circumstances they ended up in a fight instead. I recently read an article by Nev Sagiba related to this topic and decided to add my 2 cents worth.

First of all, a physical attack is actually implemented when someone is actually closing the distance towards you or those you care about (or are in some way responsible for) and they are on their way to strike, stab, grab, beat or otherwise immediately hurt them or you Right NOW! For this to actually be a physical attack they also must be close enough that within seconds they can actually begin contact and the physical aspect of the attack is imminent.

A person who throws their fists up and threatens to beat you up is verbally attacking and physically posturing but not yet physically attacking. A person who is upset and yelling is upset or/and threatening and posturing is verbally attacking but not yet physically attacking. A person swearing at you is verbally attacking and posturing but not yet physically attacking. A person who is busting things in the room or kicking your car is posturing and attacking things but is not yet physically attacking you. You get the idea.

When I began learning martial arts a lot of what I learned taught a person how to engage in a fight. Fortunately for me my instructor was also very street-wise and taught me as much about street fighting as he did about the arts. Part of his training included the idea of getting out of there and using any unfair advantage you could get to win a serious physical confrontation. I also found that when I was threatened with a fist fight that I did not just jump in there swinging away like a mad man but that instead I had a tendency to utilize positioning and verbal skills to try to deter my would be attacker. Due to attacks, that I personally experienced, I also found that when I needed to defend myself that techniques that would allow me to quickly end a physical confrontation and get out of there were much more important to me than being able to exchange a lot of punches and kicks. This was partially due to the fact that even in school yard fist fights the average fight involved multiple attackers and if I got tangled up with someone the next thing I knew their buddies were also all over me. My findings and understanding of what happens in real situations eventually led me to Pentjak Silat, Kun Tao and Kun Tao Silat as the arts that I needed to deal with the harsh realities of surviving street encounters.

When a person attacks you verbally (yelling and threatening) or non-verbally (such as waving their fists) then a response of some kind is still called for. Generally speaking the response is fairly simple. Either work to help end and bring an acceptable solution/conclusion to the problem or simply remove yourself from the situation by running or driving away.

Awareness is key. If I have parked my car in a parking space that another driver has perceived as their parking spot and they are cussing me out all I have to do is move my car so that the other person can park there. It is inconvenient but not worth the trouble that would be created by allowing the situation to escalate to a physical confrontation. By the way, to fight with someone about this type of a situation would not be an attack as much as an agreed upon fight. When someone is a victim of "Road Rage" by another driver there are many responses that a person can choose. One of the responses is to pull over and physically fight with them. As soon as you pull over and jump out of your car ready to fist fight this becomes an agreed upon fight and not a physical attack.

The drunk person who grabs your wrist to ask you for money may not be attacking to kill you but they are definitely physically assaulting and attacking you. This does not mean that you need to seriously maim or kill them but it does give you the right to dump them on their tail and disengage yourself from them. If it is obvious that they mean no harm then I generally do not consider this as an attack. If their intentions are unclear in a potentially threatening way or seem threatening then I do consider it an attack and will treat it as such.

Utilize Awareness to the extent that you see the drunk person before they are close enough to put a hand on you and you simply do not allow them to touch you and when you are parking your car see where other traffic is so that you know if someone else thought the spot was theirs before you are in the parking spot properly lining up your car between the lines. Also and very importantly, if someone is approaching so they can physically attack you then awareness can make all the difference. You see the person approaching and remove yourself completely by driving or jogging away. If the attacker is attacking you at random then this generally ends the situation. Getting away is our first line of defense and the easiest to use with the least consequences after the fact. Good awareness skills are vital and properly utilizing them will stop most situations from becoming a physical attack.

I have been attacked about 15 times in the street. Two of the attacks were at gunpoint and fortunately for me were primarily verbal attacks and only one became physical when I grabbed the guy. The other one gun assault ended with no physical altercation as I simply talked to the guy and literally calmed him down. About six of the attacks were from multiple attackers and most of them involved a situation where the physical aspect of the attack was fairly immediate without warning or provocation. An example is a car screeched to a stop and out poured 4-5 guys running to attack me. I was in the wrong part of town and stood out like a sore thumb. The attack was most likely racially motivated but could have easily happened for other reasons as well as I was leaving a job where I was dressed very nicely in a suit in a very poor and financially depressed area of town in a large inner city area. I have had a knife pulled on me about 5 times. Fortunately, only one of these were a direct physical assault and most of them were what I like to call "show and tell" verbal assaults. The interesting thing is that in most of the knife assaults were multiple attacker situations where one person held the knife and threatened while others with them watched and backed them up. The bad news is that fairly common street tactic is for the group to hold you down while the person with the knife stabs you to death. By being aware of my surroundings only in the first of these attacks (which happened when I was 12 years old) did the attackers actually get within reach of me. Fortunately, it was only a robbery and I gave them my money and stuff and they were satisfied. For me this event was pivotal in my personal development of awareness and I was not ever caught that unaware or unprepared again. Eventually I grew up, graduated from college and moved away from the bad neighborhoods I grew up in but then for many years I lived and worked in Tampa Florida while it was the number 4 worst crime city in America. Eventually, I moved to a rural area with less crime and less people. Not a luxury everyone can afford and if they could then, of course, eventually the crime would follow them.

I realized at a very young age that if attacked by someone who would kill me in order to get a few dollars for drug money I would have to be willing to fight for my life and that it might mean seriously injuring or killing them to stop them. A person who is high might be seriously wounded and have a life ending injury and yet keep attacking without any realization of how seriously bad off they are. If you assume they will stop and they don't it is possible that the attacker just might take you to the grave with them. In our style of martial arts Clear's Silat based on Pentjak Silat, Kun Tao and Kun Tao Silat we work very hard to avoid and non-violently end confrontations but when lethal force is necessary against violent street lethal attackers we do not pretend that there is some humane way to end the situation. We try to get away as fast and early as possible. If it is not possible to get away then we do the maximum amount of damage in the absolute shortest amount of time possible with the goal being to get away and in our style of martial arts we practice exiting and getting away after any serious technique as the escape is the goal and the damage we inflict is simply one very serious tool in our arsenal to accomplish this end. This is the only way to survive against serious multiple attackers who will kill you and beat you to death without hesitation and then laugh about it later over Malt Liquor or shots of whiskey/tequila while smoking some crack. Criminals do not believe in a fair fight and they hope the intended victim does as it is an incredible advantage to them in a real situation. Hopefully you will be good at awareness and avoiding bad situations but if you are seriously attacked play to survive not to be friendly or fair to a hardened criminal who would think nothing of killing you or your loved ones.

Richard E. Clear
rclear@clearsilat.com
www.streetkungfu.com
 

tarzan

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i enjoyed this. and agree with you wholeheartedly that there are other options than to just stand and fight some one, or a group of people.
 

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This is a nicely written article and has several good points to which I would like to comment on based on my own personal experiences and things I've learned through the years.
First of all Ben, at first I thought it was you that written this and then realized that it was someone else and you copied it verbatim to here, that's fine and well and good but I think I would've also liked to have your take on it also, your view on it and why/what made you wish to share this. :asian: Thank you either way for doing so.

What Constitutes an Attack

In the Martial Arts you hear and read about people who have used their Martial Art to physically defend themselves in a real situation. Often the defender could very easily have avoided the entire situation but instead due to any number of circumstances they ended up in a fight instead. I recently read an article by Nev Sagiba related to this topic and decided to add my 2 cents worth.

First of all, a physical attack is actually implemented when someone is actually closing the distance towards you or those you care about (or are in some way responsible for) and they are on their way to strike, stab, grab, beat or otherwise immediately hurt them or you Right NOW! For this to actually be a physical attack they also must be close enough that within seconds they can actually begin contact and the physical aspect of the attack is imminent.
Legally an attack (physical) can be if someone belligerently flips your tie while running off at the mouth. If you do not want someone to touch you and they do so in a manner that is threatening you can file assault charges (probably a big ado about nothing but it's within your rights). Someone poking you in the chest to empathize their point can be considered an assault/attack. You have your personal space and it's within your rights as a human being to allow or not anyone to intrude upon it.
That being said; that is basically a judgment call that needs to be realistically assessed and (reasonably) enacted upon. It's also a judgment call that needs to be honed to milliseconds so to better preserve your life and the ones you love. Experience I think can only enhance this.

A person who throws their fists up and threatens to beat you up is verbally attacking and physically posturing but not yet physically attacking. A person who is upset and yelling is upset or/and threatening and posturing is verbally attacking but not yet physically attacking. A person swearing at you is verbally attacking and posturing but not yet physically attacking. A person who is busting things in the room or kicking your car is posturing and attacking things but is not yet physically attacking you. You get the idea.
In my life I've had hundreds of guys threatening me that they're "going to kick my ***!" and maybe out of those perhaps 2 or 3 were actually going to do it. Many were probably very serious about it but they never actually took that first step in doing so... moving towards me. Just as many have verbally assaulted me and I returned fire just as eloquently or more so. :idunno: just venting off is what that is... and the childhood adage of words will never hurt me usually holds very true in these instances. If I've done/said something to anger another enough for them to raise their voice to me and call me all kinds of things under the sun then how is that an attack? True, they've lost control of their rationalization but they're just expressing themselves (inappropriately yes), but the fault lies with me because it's me that they're angry with, they might've been having a great day until I came along. Thus I need to learn to better my people skills so to avoid creating this situation.
However a person busting up what's yours (materialistically), for whatever reason, you DO have the right to defend (life, liberty and property) and should do what you can to prevent further harm... after all you worked hard 40 hours a week for months to pay for that item they're busting up didn't cha? Essentially if they're attacking your property they're attacking YOU.
When I began learning martial arts a lot of what I learned taught a person how to engage in a fight. Fortunately for me my instructor was also very street-wise and taught me as much about street fighting as he did about the arts. Part of his training included the idea of getting out of there and using any unfair advantage you could get to win a serious physical confrontation. I also found that when I was threatened with a fist fight that I did not just jump in there swinging away like a mad man but that instead I had a tendency to utilize positioning and verbal skills to try to deter my would be attacker. Due to attacks, that I personally experienced, I also found that when I needed to defend myself that techniques that would allow me to quickly end a physical confrontation and get out of there were much more important to me than being able to exchange a lot of punches and kicks. This was partially due to the fact that even in school yard fist fights the average fight involved multiple attackers and if I got tangled up with someone the next thing I knew their buddies were also all over me. My findings and understanding of what happens in real situations eventually led me to Pentjak Silat, Kun Tao and Kun Tao Silat as the arts that I needed to deal with the harsh realities of surviving street encounters.
Most of my "instructors" were also street-wise individuals and while their experience was proven invaluable to me, my own personal experiences were likewise a great asset which allows me to sit comfortably here in my room and type this response out.
I've mentioned before in other threads that my eldest brother gave me a fine piece of advice when it came to altercations... "there's no such thing as a fair fight".
Yet many "street fights" were indeed nothing more than vent sessions, call it anger-management therapy where two guys are cussing each other out and telling (sometimes hilarious) "Yo Mamma" lines back and forth at the top of their lungs, without any intention of coming into physical contact. Others were very physical and very violent/bloody. I've been blessed to have seemingly avoided these trips to the hospital/morgue altercations. I've been in street fights and they're more tussle and bustle and a few lucky punches/kicks thrown in for good measure. Only a few were of the caliber where the training I had received ended the fight quickly and decisively... fortunately in my favor.

When a person attacks you verbally (yelling and threatening) or non-verbally (such as waving their fists) then a response of some kind is still called for. Generally speaking the response is fairly simple. Either work to help end and bring an acceptable solution/conclusion to the problem or simply remove yourself from the situation by running or driving away.
I call this the Bugs Bunny method of negotiation... baffle them with brilliance if you can't dazzle them with ********.

Awareness is key. If I have parked my car in a parking space that another driver has perceived as their parking spot and they are cussing me out all I have to do is move my car so that the other person can park there. It is inconvenient but not worth the trouble that would be created by allowing the situation to escalate to a physical confrontation. By the way, to fight with someone about this type of a situation would not be an attack as much as an agreed upon fight. When someone is a victim of "Road Rage" by another driver there are many responses that a person can choose. One of the responses is to pull over and physically fight with them. As soon as you pull over and jump out of your car ready to fist fight this becomes an agreed upon fight and not a physical attack.
Awareness indeed is the key as oft repeated on this forum. And definitely we always, ALWAYS have the choice to fight or flight. Someone being a jerk on the highway behind the wheel of a lethal weapon can be avoided. No law says you HAVE to get out of the car. Indeed it no longer becomes a matter of defense when one voluntarily gets out of their vehicle to meet their attacker.

The drunk person who grabs your wrist to ask you for money may not be attacking to kill you but they are definitely physically assaulting and attacking you. This does not mean that you need to seriously maim or kill them but it does give you the right to dump them on their tail and disengage yourself from them. If it is obvious that they mean no harm then I generally do not consider this as an attack. If their intentions are unclear in a potentially threatening way or seem threatening then I do consider it an attack and will treat it as such.
Intent is the hardest thing to interpret. Particularly with a person under the influence. They may have just grabbed your wrist out of wanting to keep their balance and don't mean anything by it. You can still choose to interpret it as an assault and (again) react accordingly. But here I say act as gently as possible because they are drunk and thus their reaction time and reflexes are greatly impaired and may not do enough to prevent a simple fall from becoming a life threatening injury. Again, judgment is needed and discipline.

Utilize Awareness to the extent that you see the drunk person before they are close enough to put a hand on you and you simply do not allow them to touch you and when you are parking your car see where other traffic is so that you know if someone else thought the spot was theirs before you are in the parking spot properly lining up your car between the lines. Also and very importantly, if someone is approaching so they can physically attack you then awareness can make all the difference. You see the person approaching and remove yourself completely by driving or jogging away. If the attacker is attacking you at random then this generally ends the situation. Getting away is our first line of defense and the easiest to use with the least consequences after the fact. Good awareness skills are vital and properly utilizing them will stop most situations from becoming a physical attack.
Keep in mind that a drunk person, again, may not mean any harm in their approach. They might want to get close to you to focus better, to make sure which of the three of you they're seeing is the one they need to talk to :wink1: But yes, ensure a safe avenue of escape and prevent yourself from being hemmed in. Sometimes the interior of the car isn't always the safest place to be, it could very well be a trap that's very difficult to escape from.

I have been attacked about 15 times in the street. Two of the attacks were at gunpoint and fortunately for me were primarily verbal attacks and only one became physical when I grabbed the guy. The other one gun assault ended with no physical altercation as I simply talked to the guy and literally calmed him down. About six of the attacks were from multiple attackers and most of them involved a situation where the physical aspect of the attack was fairly immediate without warning or provocation. An example is a car screeched to a stop and out poured 4-5 guys running to attack me. I was in the wrong part of town and stood out like a sore thumb. The attack was most likely racially motivated but could have easily happened for other reasons as well as I was leaving a job where I was dressed very nicely in a suit in a very poor and financially depressed area of town in a large inner city area. I have had a knife pulled on me about 5 times. Fortunately, only one of these were a direct physical assault and most of them were what I like to call "show and tell" verbal assaults. The interesting thing is that in most of the knife assaults were multiple attacker situations where one person held the knife and threatened while others with them watched and backed them up. The bad news is that fairly common street tactic is for the group to hold you down while the person with the knife stabs you to death. By being aware of my surroundings only in the first of these attacks (which happened when I was 12 years old) did the attackers actually get within reach of me. Fortunately, it was only a robbery and I gave them my money and stuff and they were satisfied. For me this event was pivotal in my personal development of awareness and I was not ever caught that unaware or unprepared again. Eventually I grew up, graduated from college and moved away from the bad neighborhoods I grew up in but then for many years I lived and worked in Tampa Florida while it was the number 4 worst crime city in America. Eventually, I moved to a rural area with less crime and less people. Not a luxury everyone can afford and if they could then, of course, eventually the crime would follow them.
Not necessarily. I'm one of those who have made a move from a highly dangerous area to a very safe area and now live in a moderately safe area. My personal levels of awareness are adjusted accordingly.

I realized at a very young age that if attacked by someone who would kill me in order to get a few dollars for drug money I would have to be willing to fight for my life and that it might mean seriously injuring or killing them to stop them. A person who is high might be seriously wounded and have a life ending injury and yet keep attacking without any realization of how seriously bad off they are. If you assume they will stop and they don't it is possible that the attacker just might take you to the grave with them. In our style of martial arts Clear's Silat based on Pentjak Silat, Kun Tao and Kun Tao Silat we work very hard to avoid and non-violently end confrontations but when lethal force is necessary against violent street lethal attackers we do not pretend that there is some humane way to end the situation. We try to get away as fast and early as possible. If it is not possible to get away then we do the maximum amount of damage in the absolute shortest amount of time possible with the goal being to get away and in our style of martial arts we practice exiting and getting away after any serious technique as the escape is the goal and the damage we inflict is simply one very serious tool in our arsenal to accomplish this end. This is the only way to survive against serious multiple attackers who will kill you and beat you to death without hesitation and then laugh about it later over Malt Liquor or shots of whiskey/tequila while smoking some crack. Criminals do not believe in a fair fight and they hope the intended victim does as it is an incredible advantage to them in a real situation. Hopefully you will be good at awareness and avoiding bad situations but if you are seriously attacked play to survive not to be friendly or fair to a hardened criminal who would think nothing of killing you or your loved ones.

Richard E. Clear
rclear@clearsilat.com
www.streetkungfu.com
Making the choice to kill someone in defense is easy....living with it afterwards, sometimes, isn't.
Something to think about.
 
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ben

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Thanks for taking the time to read the article and to write such a lengthy and thoughtful response.

That being said; that is basically a judgment call that needs to be realistically assessed and (reasonably) enacted upon. It's also a judgment call that needs to be honed to milliseconds so to better preserve your life and the ones you love. Experience I think can only enhance this.

Yes, the problem though is time.

An attackers goal is to make sure that they completely dominate a situation from before it starts until after they're long gone and that the victim has no time whatsoever to respond. This means that I can't afford to spend even milliseconds making decisions. My response needs to be immediate and effective. I also do not want to make a life and death decision that will effect my immediate physical safety and my future liberty as well as the lives and well being of my loved ones and those around me in milliseconds while under stressful conditions.

The solution is training with an understanding of the difference between a fistfight and an attack. And developing a single response that deals with both effectively while forcing the potential attackers to either end their attack or make themselves and their intentions very clear to me and to any witnesses/bystanders before any physical contact is made.

However a person busting up what's yours (materialistically), for whatever reason, you DO have the right to defend (life, liberty and property) and should do what you can to prevent further harm... after all you worked hard 40 hours a week for months to pay for that item they're busting up didn't cha? Essentially if they're attacking your property they're attacking YOU.

While I agree that you SHOULD have the right to defend your property, in most states you only have the right to defend yourself from an immediate threat of deadly force.

In TN (and some other states) we recently passed the castle doctrine which basically means that we no longer have a duty to retreat if our home or car is broken into. We can assume there is an immediate threat of deadly force and respond accordingly.

And definitely we always, ALWAYS have the choice to fight or flight

I would say almost always. There are circumstances such as age, illness, injury and the presence of loved ones where flight may be an unsafe or impossible option. However with a reasonable amount of awareness and a little foresight almost all of these situations can be avoided.

Intent is the hardest thing to interpret. Particularly with a person under the influence. They may have just grabbed your wrist out of wanting to keep their balance and don't mean anything by it. You can still choose to interpret it as an assault and (again) react accordingly. But here I say act as gently as possible because they are drunk and thus their reaction time and reflexes are greatly impaired and may not do enough to prevent a simple fall from becoming a life threatening injury. Again, judgment is needed and discipline.

Or, because they are drunk or high or otherwise mentally impaired, they may not feel pain and a response that would stop even serious attackers may not be enough to protect yourself.

This example is exactly why it is necessary to train a method that takes into account multiple armed attackers, the clumsy drunk, an old friend trying to get your attention and a loved one try to pull you out of oncoming traffic. A response must happen instantly without thought, otherwise it will be to slow, and so it must deal with ALL of these situations effectively while making it clear to you and others which one of these situations is occurring.

One of the worst kinds of situations to be in is one where you don't know how much force is necessary. If someone is clearly not a threat then things are simple. If someone clearly is an immediate deadly threat then you simply use anything and everything to remove the threat as quickly and safely (for you) as possible. However, if the other persons intentions are unclear then you're left trying to figure out whats going on when you're life, liberty and happiness may depend on what you do in the next half second.

Making the choice to kill someone in defense is easy....living with it afterwards, sometimes, isn't.

Yes, that's why a self defense system must protect you physically, legally and morally. Dying or being severely injured is unacceptable but so is losing your freedom or your home due to criminal and civil lawsuits as well as losing sleep because you killed or injured someone when you didn't need to even if it was legally justifiable.

Here is a link to some video that talks more about the difference between a fist fight and an attack, our approach to self defense and why it is what it is. Application of Beladiri
 

MA-Caver

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Knowing how much force to use against an attacker is sometimes left up to the attacker themselves. Lots of guys in my experience talk the big talk... but as soon as they get a simple bop on the nose it's over and they're cowering and pleading with you to stop what you're doing. Some just go ballistic after a simple bop on the nose, and may not know WHEN to stop. For each, and everywhere in between, IMO takes a disciplined well trained fighter to know how much is enough for THEM to stop, this goes right up to deadly (necessary) force.
Not all deadly force (towards you) should be stopped with deadly force in return. Taking out their ability to continue moving towards you (i.e. side kick to the knee caps, etc) usually ends the conflict/altercation right there. Pain is an effective deterrent sometimes ... even for drunks.
I am not trying to defend drunks or even cut them a break, many drunks disgust me and I want nothing to do with them... but having BEEN a drunk before I at least know of dozens whose intent were merely an effect from their feeling so damned good at the moment and they just wanted to share that feeling. Learning to ascertain that takes time and even then it's sometimes difficult to differentiate.
Had a fella, a big fella, looking all mean and not too damned happy at all and definitely reeking with alcohol (could smell it 6 feet away) come up to me, sat down beside me, wrapped his arm around my shoulder and that was it. After a few moments he turned his head and said: "y-you know whhat? You're a-ah alhright fffellah" and that was it. Go figure. Never forgot that guy... whomever he was.
 

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When there is a confrontation, I sometimes I get into that annoying situation where there is a a staredown "competition" with the other person who is standing right in front of me.

While staring there is the anxiety of waiting for him to hit first so you can deflect it but it does more harm than good as the anxiety and uneasiness can cause you to misinterpret when he is going to hit first.Imagine thinking he is about to strike and he doesn't then you try to anticipate it again.3 seconds later he finally does hit you and you didn't see it coming and he might have the upper hand since he started the attack and your head has been smacked by then,causing your vision to be blur.

The other choice would be to safeguard your own right to protect yourself and hit him first if he behaves in a threatening manner before you face serious injury at his hands but the police and law will take the aggressor's side since you hit first.In America, the laws are better to protect someone who has the right to protect themselves. But in the countries where the policemen are near corrupt(like mine) the law is rather loose and I could get into trouble for hitting first.Anyonce has advice on what I should do?
 

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However a person busting up what's yours (materialistically), for whatever reason, you DO have the right to defend (life, liberty and property) and should do what you can to prevent further harm... after all you worked hard 40 hours a week for months to pay for that item they're busting up didn't cha? Essentially if they're attacking your property they're attacking YOU.
.

Very true.If the cab driver refuses to use the meter and dictate extremely high fees while behaving threateningly and shouting at you while refusing to let you use the cab behind who does use a meter, you have the right to choose to not to use his cab cause it's you own hard earned money.He has no right to force you to take his cab and pay an extra 20$.And if he tries to force you aggresively you have the right to safeguard your own cash.

However , the law here sucks to the maximum and the police will arrest both the aggressor and defender and the chaotic law system could take years to prove you innocent.And for what?Protecting your own money?
 
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ben

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I agree that every situation is different and will require a different level of force.

But how do you gauge the appropriate amount of force in a split second without risking the consequences of a wrong decision?

If I give the guy that just needs a bop on the nose anything more than that, then next thing I know I'll be defending myself against criminal and possibly civil lawsuits and even if I win I'll still be out thousands of dollars in legal fees. If I give the guy that goes ballistic a simple bop on the nose, then I'll be beaten to a pulp before I realize I need anything more than that. And even if I do gauge the correct amount of force, what if the guy slips and hits his head on the concrete the wrong way? Now I'm back in deep legal and moral trouble. Or what if he gets angry and steps it up a notch or pulls a knife or maybe the whole thing was just bait and he had a screwdriver in his hand the whole time. I thought we were having a friendly fist fight and now I'm trying to figure out why I'm bleeding all over the place.

Someone who wants to rob, kill, maim or kidnap you isn't going to announce their intentions from across the street (and if they do you now have plenty of time to run and call the police) they're going to tell you they want your wallet AFTER they've stuck a knife in you're ribs.

Trying to judge someones intentions or an appropriate amount of force in a split second under stressful conditions is too risky. I'm simply not willing to play guessing games when the stakes are so high.

So, instead of trying to use a range of possible options from no force all they way up to deadly force and beyond, I want to keep it simple and do 1 of 2 things: use no force whatsoever (this includes avoiding the situation, leaving, running, talking my way out, etc...) or if that fails and violence is unavoidable then I want to use such a devastating amount of force that the attackers are completely overwhelmed and I am left unscathed (you can't win a knife fight by trading blows)

The other choice would be to safeguard your own right to protect yourself and hit him first if he behaves in a threatening manner before you face serious injury at his hands but the police and law will take the aggressor's side since you hit first.In America, the laws are better to protect someone who has the right to protect themselves. But in the countries where the policemen are near corrupt(like mine) the law is rather loose and I could get into trouble for hitting first.Anyonce has advice on what I should do?

Some of this is answered on video in the link I posted above. The basic answer is move and stay mobile don't ever let them get within reach of you (the distance may change depending on your surroundings). Engage them in conversation before they get close to you. I can give directions at 15 and 20 feet just as easily as I can at 2 and 3. With a little practice you can do it without being rude and without the person noticing that you never let them get close to you. If I'm giving directions at 15 feet and the person is still trying to close the distance, a simple "Hey thats close enough" or a "Get Back!" might be all you need. But If I'm moving away from somebody, I have my hands up, I'm shouting "GET BACK" and they're still coming after me then I have to assume they are trying to seriously hurt me and If I can't leave then I will have to take them out as soon as they are within reach.

By moving, creating space and using verbal and body language you force the attackers to come to you and you force them to make it very obvious that they are violently attacking you. This way there is no doubt as to the level of force needed and anybody within earshot will be able to verify you're story.
 
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