An Article in Black Belt Magazine

CuongNhuka

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There was an article in Black Belt written by an upper rank in Tae Kwon Do. The article was about useing Tae Kwon Do in practicle self defense, just not in the traditional sense. The author was writting about how statisticly, you are far more likely to suffer from a "life style desease" then be violently attacked (up to 43 times more likely). And that since many of these deseases are caused by a lack of exercise, and that since RBSD doesn't really do too much exercise, it is not really practical in preventing you from what you are more likely to have to deal with.
This article raises some intresting points, all of which, I have already been kinda thinking about. If you are training for "real life self defense, with no useless crap added", then shouldn't you learn how to defend yourself, from yourself? Shouldn't you learn things like how to install (and use) a home and car seciruty system, how to pick your freinds (no one who will get you into trouble), how use an alarm clock, how to avoid identy theft, how to exercise, and so on, and then learn how to defend yourself from the mugger you might encounter?
 

Drac

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I must have missed that article...
 
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CuongNhuka

CuongNhuka

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It's apparently October '07, the article is titled True Value, page 130.
 

Seabrook

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There was an article in Black Belt written by an upper rank in Tae Kwon Do. The article was about useing Tae Kwon Do in practicle self defense, just not in the traditional sense. The author was writting about how statisticly, you are far more likely to suffer from a "life style desease" then be violently attacked (up to 43 times more likely). And that since many of these deseases are caused by a lack of exercise, and that since RBSD doesn't really do too much exercise, it is not really practical in preventing you from what you are more likely to have to deal with.
This article raises some intresting points, all of which, I have already been kinda thinking about. If you are training for "real life self defense, with no useless crap added", then shouldn't you learn how to defend yourself, from yourself? Shouldn't you learn things like how to install (and use) a home and car seciruty system, how to pick your freinds (no one who will get you into trouble), how use an alarm clock, how to avoid identy theft, how to exercise, and so on, and then learn how to defend yourself from the mugger you might encounter?

In the early phases of one's martial arts training, it is common to be fascinated with all of the fighting aspects of one's art. As one progresses to higher levels, however, most martial artists realize that it is no longer about fighting, but rather personal growth. I get a tremendous amount of physical and mental exercise from martial arts training, and also choose to eat a healthy balanced diet because of it, all of which contribute to a healthier life.

Some of the other variables you mentioned above are important as well. At least bi-weekly I give talks at the end of my classes about choosing friends that you can trust, and that aren't following a path that can be destructive to one's lifestyle. Smoking, drugs, and excessive alcohol use, for example, just don't mix with a top martial artist.
 

Andrew Green

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It's apparently October '07, the article is titled True Value, page 130.


I want a article on how to defend against really stupid dating systems in use by Magazines. October? It's the middle of AUGUST! ARRG!

Ok, I'm good, pet peeve...

But seriously, yes, the best thing I think a person can do to stay healthy is not learn to gouge eyes, but learn to stay in shape. Without that it's all meaningless.

I also remember reading or hearing or something years ago that many of the old Karate masters said the best way to judge how good a persons karate was, was by how long they lived.
 
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CuongNhuka

CuongNhuka

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In the early phases of one's martial arts training, it is common to be fascinated with all of the fighting aspects of one's art. As one progresses to higher levels, however, most martial artists realize that it is no longer about fighting, but rather personal growth. I get a tremendous amount of physical and mental exercise from martial arts training, and also choose to eat a healthy balanced diet because of it, all of which contribute to a healthier life.

Some of the other variables you mentioned above are important as well. At least bi-weekly I give talks at the end of my classes about choosing friends that you can trust, and that aren't following a path that can be destructive to one's lifestyle. Smoking, drugs, and excessive alcohol use, for example, just don't mix with a top martial artist.

In Cuong Nhu we have sets of little philosophy. One is the Five Troubles to aviod
1. Alcohol abuse
2. bigoted bull
3. cardiovascular carelessness
4. drug dependency
5. exessive ego.

Sounds like my style and your school are on the same thought wave.
 
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CuongNhuka

CuongNhuka

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I want a article on how to defend against really stupid dating systems in use by Magazines. October? It's the middle of AUGUST! ARRG!

Ok, I'm good, pet peeve...

But seriously, yes, the best thing I think a person can do to stay healthy is not learn to gouge eyes, but learn to stay in shape. Without that it's all meaningless.

I also remember reading or hearing or something years ago that many of the old Karate masters said the best way to judge how good a persons karate was, was by how long they lived.

Yah, I don't get it either.
Ah, be we from differnit styles, we have similar mentalities. LOL
 

thardey

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One of my most useful "survival" skills, (which I guess are different from M.A.) is one I learned from years of riding street motorcycles. I learned to keep my eyes open, and know what's happening around me.

Not that my memory is all that good, like, I don't remember what kind of car, or what color it was, that almost changed lanes on top of me, but I could probably tell you at what moment the driver decided to commit to changing lanes.

I remember reading once that the eyes of an "experienced" motorcycle rider scan about 10 times as quickly as an inexperienced one, whether on a motorcycle or not. This gives you a lot more data to filter while walking down the street. Someone following you gets noticed in the reflection of the windows you're passing. Shadows moving in odd directions start to stand out.

This is a skill that anybody can train themselves to learn, but is strictly a "pre-fight" kind of a skill. When you're in hand-to-hand combat, I do much better when I focus on one spot, and let my peripheral vision pick up motion. But during the "approach" or the "yellow" phase of combat, you'll pick it up much faster if you keep scanning. Besides, most predators won't "mark" someone who is alert.

This keeps you alive against bad drivers, animals, "surprise" muggers, as well as makes you more polite (social awareness is generally appreciated), you notice opportunities to help others, (carry bags, open doors, etc), and in general raises your quality of life. Plus, sometimes you notice the beautiful sunsets that you would otherwise miss, or catch that subtle tone in your wife's voice that means she wants some attention. (Before it become THE TONE.)
 

Seabrook

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In Cuong Nhu we have sets of little philosophy. One is the Five Troubles to aviod
1. Alcohol abuse
2. bigoted bull
3. cardiovascular carelessness
4. drug dependency
5. exessive ego.

Sounds like my style and your school are on the same thought wave.

That is a great list!
 
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CuongNhuka

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That is a great list!

You can go the website (www.cuongnhu.com), some-where on there is all of our philosohies, code of ethics, and so on.

And Thardey brings up other ideas which should be taught, such as defensive driving, and "counter-offensive driving", manners, so on.
 

Darth F.Takeda

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I think the guy who wrote the article was trying to find away to make himself feel better about his long time study of an art that leaves him less prepared for a mugging or assult than someone who spent a few years in a combat art/system.

Yes I know there are many reasons to study martial arts, but bottom line is they were originally about killing and maiming.

I work out , eat healthy and do martial arts, as well as drive carefully, watch before I cross the road and dont stand in the niddle of a feild durring lightning storms.
 

SKB

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I train for SD and the mental aspects at the dojo....... I run or go to the gym to workout. If your MA training is cardio-kickboxing style maybe you should take cardio-kickboxing? To me the two things, working out/ training, are two diffrent things.
 

Adept

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If you are training for "real life self defense, with no useless crap added", then shouldn't you learn how to defend yourself, from yourself? Shouldn't you learn things like how to install (and use) a home and car seciruty system, how to pick your freinds (no one who will get you into trouble), how use an alarm clock, how to avoid identy theft, how to exercise, and so on, and then learn how to defend yourself from the mugger you might encounter?

Certainly. But what has that to do with martial arts? Those are separate (and still important) life skills, which can (and should) be learned independently from the martial arts.

The authors opinion is that TKD is a valuable art, as it relates to self defense, because it increases fitness? Well, so does water polo. I'd hardly call water polo a self defense skill set.
 
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CuongNhuka

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The last three points are all well made. I think the author was trying to explain that if you are going to learn to defend yourslef, maybe you should learn to defend yourself agianst yourself. Outside that, I don't know. I also don't really worry about it, I just thought some of you folks might enjoy it.
 

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