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    Minghe Quan / Ershiba Bu (Nipaipo)

    As a Karate practitioner who takes interest in learning the Chinese origins of my style, I have recently come across an extremely interesting link between Kung Fu and Karate: a routine known as 28 Steps (Ershiba Bu in Mandarin, Nipaipo in Japanese). For those who are unaware, Karate kata are...
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    Clashing limbs during sparring

    Applied some of this a few days ago. Yeah so basically: -Beginners love to do things that make limbs clash. -Slow speed = more chances of clashing. -Moving around the opponent = less chances of clashing. But I am starting to see how point sparring can develop bad habits. I love the kata of...
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    "Wun Shu" hyung(?)

    Jackpot. :)
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    Clashing limbs during sparring

    I recently sparred with a white belt and I think I know the problem: white belts throw techniques too slowly. When I spar with a black belt, we're both moving too fast to even clash out limbs against anything other than the intended target. White belts, on the other hand, throw these very slow...
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    Clashing limbs during sparring

    All of it. It's annoying at best and injurious at worst. It completely discourages me from even sparring at all.
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    Clashing limbs during sparring

    I have a huge problem when it comes to sparring. You see, I am not afraid to get hit, whether it's in the face, body, legs, etc. What I am afraid of is throwing a technique and my knee/hand/etc clashes against my opponent's. I notice that this problem is especially evident in point-based...
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    Crescent kick = useful?

    I notice that the crescent kick (outside-to-inside) is a much more easy technique to throw than a roundhouse kick and requires a lot less hip flexibility. I also find myself able to generate a lot more power with it a lot more easily than with a roundhouse kick, especially to a higher target...
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    The distaste for strength in martial arts

    I occasionally get roasted for spending too much effort on strength training and being too slow. However... ...they're usually the ones getting tired after 5 pushups while I'm breezing through 30. They're usually the ones reeling over from a body shot while I just carry on from it. They're...
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    Uselessness of kata in the real world!

    I have probably stated this before but... The way I see it, doing kata correctly requires you to be quite strong, fast, and flexible. And if you are strong, fast, and flexible, you'd probably fair decently well in an altercation with an untrained dude about your same size. Same logic applies to...
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    "The Taikyoku Problem"

    If you don't mind me asking, what is your first form?
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    "The Taikyoku Problem"

    One thought that I had last night while thinking about the replies is this: If a student isn't willing to put in the work and wants to do the fun stuff, Taikyoku won't do it for them but a more interesting kata like Tekki, Bassai, etc. just might. On the other hand, if a student is willing to...
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    "The Taikyoku Problem"

    I guess this brings us to a very big problem in the modern-day Western world: people like things to be easy and entertaining. My original post was an appeal to this way of thinking and a suggestion on how to market Karate to these sorts of people.
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    "The Taikyoku Problem"

    As someone who has been doing Shotokan for a while (although admittedly not THAT long), I can appreciate the Taikyoku forms for what they teach in terms of stance, techniques, mechanics, etc. However, I speak as someone who notices that not everyone is willing to put that much effort into...
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    "The Taikyoku Problem"

    Allow me to clarify one thing that I said: when I was referring to impracticality, I was not referring to the 270 spin but rather the step-punch. The 270 spin is practical, I was simply calling it a hard thing for new students to do. The step, punch, on the other hand, is easy but impractical...
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    "The Taikyoku Problem"

    Your last point summarized my feelings in a nutshell. All to often do I see a student doing a kata, missing a movement, and saying "Sorry, can I start over?" They're too preoccupied with getting the pattern right that they can't do it with any spirit. Adding what Kung Fu Wang mentioned, though...
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    "The Taikyoku Problem"

    What I mean regarding this "fighting mindset" is that - at least for me - a kata like Unsu or Gankaku or Bassai-Dai is intense enough that it comes close to replicating the "feeling" of sparring with someone, whereas Taikyoku does not give this feeling. Taikyoku feel so basic that I might as...
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    "The Taikyoku Problem"

    (This is a TMA issue which primarily concerns Karate and Taekwondo). I have been doing Karate for 6 years and teaching for almost half a year. I have also done some Taekwondo and similar Korean arts. One common theme between all of these arts is that beginner students learn a very simple...
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    Gojushiho - Shorei or Shorin?

    Some source list Gojushiho/Useishi as a Shorei-ryu kata, the basis of Goju-ryu and Uechi-ryu. Other sources list it as a Shorin-ryu kata. On one hand, it does stand out as a very Shorei-looking kata, with plenty of open-hand strikes to pressure points and slow techniques, as well as not much...
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    Does kicking itself improve flexibility?

    So, it goes without saying that in order to get more flexible, you need to stretch. Dynamic stretching before workout, static stretching after. But does the act of kicking itself help one get closer to a full split? In other words, if I stretch every time I work out for a year without doing any...
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    Very, very discouraged - It seems Taekwondo is not for me

    I think doing a more hands-based martial art would be better for you. While Taekwondo requires a certain degree of athleticism, Karate is pretty versatile in terms of the physical ability requirement. Taekwondo is a hard, structured art while Karate tends to be quite fluid, with people sort of...
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    Uselessness of kata in the real world!

    Here's how I like to view it: In order to do a good kata, you have to be physically and mentally conditioned in every aspect of your being. And if you have such conditioning, you can probably fair decently well in a self defense situation. In other words, if some mentally unstable troublemaker...
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    Psycholoy of fighting

    Tell me about it! There are people in the world who don't even have a roof over their head nor a floor under their bare feet, and yet we rich, pampered Westerners have the audacity to be offended by mere words. We probably sound like broken records here but the west is indeed a minefield.
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    Beaten by a white belt.

    (sorry to double post) I guess what I mean is that if a new guy comes into the dojo, you have no idea his physical conditioning, previous martial arts history, or personality type, all of which influence how he will fight. I remember sparring with a fresh white belt and found out the hard way...
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    Beaten by a white belt.

    I guess that kinda brings light to the "size matters" argument of fighting. :D There's this 6ft2 guy at my dojo and I'm a manlet, but even though he's relatively new and sparring-shy, he's like a Dark Souls boss to me.
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    Do you need to hate your attacker?

    If you are in a non-life-or-death situation, no. There is no reason to have a burning hatred over some drunk 5ft4 guy trying to shove you around. If you are in a life-or-death situation, yes. People don't go to war with a smile on their face.
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    Beaten by a white belt.

    I don't know if this applies to non-striking arts but there is a common school of thought that beginners are harder to fight than experienced people. Why? Because they're untrained and unpredictable.
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    Psycholoy of fighting

    The only way this can happen is if one side is uninformed and the other is. Here's a fun way to test it: find two people arguing about an objective truth, tell them both to "look it up," and the one who says "I don't have to look it up, I'm right!" is the one who's probably wrong.
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    Psycholoy of fighting

    I'm not talking about scientific or mathematical realities; I'm talking about morals, things that are the main cause of most fights anyway.
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    Psycholoy of fighting

    "Wrong" is completely subjective.
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    Critique MORE of my katas

    I am considering seeing a doctor about this but on the other hand, I have been experimenting with not moving the knee these past few days and it seems to not be causing any problems. Maybe it's just an irrational fear. o_O
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