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    Sparring with sharp swords

    Hmmm. Not sure why that would be the case. It's still there. I completely agree. It was never my intention to suggest that edge-to-edge "binding" does not exist in the texts. It's certainly there, just as unarmed defense against weaponry is readily observable throughout many martial arts. For...
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    Sparring with sharp swords

    I think perhaps I have not explained myself well. I certainly was not saying that one should worry during an engagement about the health of one's sword. That would indeed be unadviseable. What I was saying is that edge to edge opposition is very bad for your blade because it degrades your blade...
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    Sparring with sharp swords

    You perform as you practice. If you practice in a manner that needlessly degrades your weaponry, be prepared to deal with the consequences. Just don't fool yourself in to thinking their aren't consequences. ??? I don't need to be an active Medieval soldier or knight in order to practice in a...
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    Sparring with sharp swords

    I'm not leaving the option out. I'm just not forgetting that such training is practice for the unfortunate realities of protracted combat in a Medieval setting (including relatively severe limitations on resources, technology, etc.), not light sparring for five minutes after which one may...
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    Sparring with sharp swords

    I will also point out that the damage sustained by the edge of that blade was from only a few minutes of light sparring. Imagine what it would look like after an hour of battle. I'd rather practice in such a way as to try to minimize the damage sustained. It's not a guarantee, but every little...
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    Sparring with sharp swords

    I have parried and blocked many forceful blows during sparring, so I will respectfully disagree. One does not need to break the line of the wrist in order to make use of the flat, because one's grip need not be static.
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    Sparring with sharp swords

    There is also a difference between being a modern person with easy access to financing, materials, and labor-saving technologies, vs. being a Medieval person without such massive advantages. Absent these massive advantages, it becomes that much more vital to take good care of your weapons and armor.
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    Sparring with sharp swords

    One such engagement is probably fine, but repeatedly using the blade in such a manner will result in the sword becoming somewhat disfunctional over time. All those nicks will cause the blade to get caught (on armor, etc), which leaves you open to counter-attack by another foe (longsword is a...
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    Sparring with sharp swords

    I suppose everyone is entitled to their own opinion. In my view, the last bit of the video illustrates quite clearly why one should not form a habit of parrying with the edge.....Unless of course you have the money to continuously replenish your armory. No sweat if that's the case. Cheers, and...
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    Sparring with sharp swords

    Not sure how to attach an image file to a post, but if you look at the last little bit of the video clip in the OP, you'll see why one should not parry with the edge. Not sure if "parrying with the edge" is the definitive definition of "bind" as it is used in Medieval manuals, but it seems to be...
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    Sparring with sharp swords

    Let me predicate my thoughts by saying that I'm not a medieval European knight, so I could be totally wrong. :) Having said that, I have to respectfully disagree. "The bind" is something to be avoided. It damages the blade - which requires money to fix - and leaves you open to other...
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    New Training Group in DFW Area

    Hello everyone! After several years of my teacher recommending that I do so, I have finally come to a place where I am ready to open a dōjō, which I have named the Hachidori Dōjō. For me, the hummingbird is a representation of endurance, precision, and maneuverability. It is for this reason -...
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    On Cross-training and "Making Stuff Work" (with clips)

    The distinction between free sparring and limited sparring is useful, if for no other reason than that they are both distinct and useful. Limited sparring will let you work on the details. Free sparring lets you work on the big picture. And neither alone is superior to both together.
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    On Cross-training and "Making Stuff Work" (with clips)

    Free sparring and limited sparring are not equivalent, even though they are both restricted forms of fighting. Weapons work highlights the distinction, IMHO. A match where I'm only trying to thrust - and my opponent is only trying to defend against such - is going to be very different than a...
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    On Cross-training and "Making Stuff Work" (with clips)

    I think that it is to such methods ("specific sparring") that I was referring when I said that the Bujinkan does not have structured pressure testing. In other arts, like BJJ for example, one has pairs and sequences of reciprocal technical application (example: I mount, so you bridge, and...
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    On Cross-training and "Making Stuff Work" (with clips)

    These three show modern katana vs longsword: I will say this: modern katana vs longsword is quite difficult. My opponent is new to the applied use of weapons in general, hence why I'm able to close with some grace in certain instances. It is quite another story to close on an experienced...
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    On Cross-training and "Making Stuff Work" (with clips)

    This one shows nitou (two swords): Personally, I really like that one.
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    On Cross-training and "Making Stuff Work" (with clips)

    Thanks! With regards to that specific clip, I don't think that I had in my mind the intention to try movements and/or techniques from the 9 schools. It was more just a free-form experience. In other instances, I have had in my mind that specific intention. Like these two, where I'm thinking of...
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    On Cross-training and "Making Stuff Work" (with clips)

    Hahaha, yes tell me about it. Many nights I've come home with bruises on my thighs. I leave them relatively unprotected in class training in order to incentivize my defense. Thighs are nice and big and meaty, so they can take a lashing without causing much real damage. The teacher in the clip...
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    On Cross-training and "Making Stuff Work" (with clips)

    I agree that there are implicit disparities that enter in to the equation when one ventures in to foreign territory. I think one of the most important components in making such an experience a positive one is the teacher. The teacher sets the tone for the training hall. Some are quite strict and...
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    On Cross-training and "Making Stuff Work" (with clips)

    Thanks! Haha, woops. I forgot to mention I'm the one in blue pants. The instructor is in all black. He's also sporting some patches with his group's emblem. I completely agree with your sentiment. I think weapons work is perhaps the venue most suited to exploring what we are pursuing. The...
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    On Cross-training and "Making Stuff Work" (with clips)

    I know that there are a range of opinions on the idea of cross-training. Most people I meet in person seem to be in favor of it. Personally, I think that my time in other arts has been quite productive. I think it's useful to expose oneself to many different styles/masters. Perhaps others feel...
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    Bujinkan vs. Gracie jiu-jitsu?

    I've heard a similar story from two Bujinkan black belts. Apparently someone in the Bujinkan brought a BJJ grappler to Nagato Sensei's dojo. Apparently it didn't work out too well for the BJJ grappler. Just what I've heard.
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