Why Nunchucks are not selling in certain states?

Discussion in 'General Weapons Discussion' started by TigerHeart, Jul 21, 2017.

  1. jks9199

    jks9199 Administrator Staff Member

    • LifeTime Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2006
    Messages:
    21,137
    Likes Received:
    1,831
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Northern VA
    Getting to the original issue -- why are various weapons illegal, with no means to get a carry nunchuk/ninja star/sap permit...

    Knee jerk reactions by uninformed politicians, often who lack any real understanding as to how dangerous a weapon is, let alone how often it's used in violent attacks. Nunchuks are deadly martial arts weapons; they've seen 'em in movies... Ninja stars kill instantly... and they're tiny so they're concealed deadly! Years back, Black Belt magazine did an editorial after a 60 Minutes "expose" about deadly martial arts weapons... 60 Minutes proved the weapons were deadly by sticking them into a watermelon. Black Belt proceeded to stick many things into a watermelon... pens, sunglasses, a stapler, various other office items, etc.

    Sometimes laws are a reaction to ongoing criminal developments; in VA, it is illegal to conceal a machete with a blade longer than 12 inches. Why? MS-13 and other street gangs.

    Wanna change it? Educate your legislators. Push for legislation for carry permits for items other than guns, if you want to be able to legally carry them. But also, learn the laws. Thanks to a ruling (that I have issues with), in VA, unless it is one of the items specifically enumerated in 18.2-308, it must be a weapon first to be of "like kind." So, lots of knives are legal, unless they are specifically dirks, Bowies, switchblades, gravity knives, etc, or specifically and solely intended to be a weapon (except for machetes).
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    16,980
    Likes Received:
    4,878
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    The whole idea of the enumerated knives (and that’s similar in some other states) is as silly as the watermelon test. Unfortunately we’d have to get into politics to talk about the difficulties in getting that changed.
     
  3. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    25,664
    Likes Received:
    4,022
    Trophy Points:
    308
    Location:
    England
    Just re-read the title of the thread, it says why aren't the nunchukus selling in certain states which means no one is buying them, if the question is why is no one selling nunchukus that's a different thing. :D

    I think the fashion for them led by the popularity of the Bruce Lee films and marketing has waned an awful lot. It's all Tap out tops now ( equally offensive when not washed)

    The question of why politicians ban certain things from chocolate eggs to nunchukus is easily answered...... because they can. They want to look pro active, like they are earning their money and being good servants of the State, the martial arts lobby for example isn't huge so they can ban things without too much outcry, opponents will be few because they too want to look good 'saving the public'. I would suggest that far from being ignorant the politicians know exactly what they are doing, it's not a hugely contentious issue, no enormous public outcry and it distracts from bigger weightier issues that politicians don't want to get bogged down in.

    In the UK there was a big outcry against edged weapons after certain incidents, the public said they wanted some weapons banned so they were. Whether they should have been is up for debate but when there's hundreds of thousands of names on petitions, victim's families calling for bans etc it's hard for politicians to tell them they won't ban them when it's something easily done. There was little dissent that made itself heard, a lot of mumbling on martial arts sites etc but no one stood up and said they shouldn't be banned.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. pdg

    pdg Senior Master

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2018
    Messages:
    2,542
    Likes Received:
    671
    Trophy Points:
    213
    The rest of your post, yes, easy 'win'.

    Not all that many years ago (in the grand sense) things like walking stick swords and walking stick shotguns were sold here in the UK as self defence items, it was at one time a legal requirement for men to own a bow and practice, etc.

    Interest waned until it was a minority pursuit.

    Fast forward to the UK handgun 'ban' - there was a backlash against that but it was so hugely outnumbered (and shoved through so quickly) it didn't stand a chance.

    Knife bans - same sort of thing. I do recall a few petitions against the ban, but it was so outnumbered by the handwringing sjw screeching from people who had never been affected in any way and had no real idea (but it was a nice bandwagon to jump on) it was never going to be heard - coupled with the petitions being obviously written by people who responsible practitioners wouldn't want to be associated with anyway...


    So, 'nunchucks' and the like got banned in some states - easy win. Not many people used them but many people feared them - any competition was easily ignored.

    Try banning handguns in those places ;)


    (This isn't a political post, it's societal.)
     
  5. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    25,664
    Likes Received:
    4,022
    Trophy Points:
    308
    Location:
    England

    Actually hand guns were banned here a very long time ago, not recently, the law was amended in the 1990s. Gun 'control' started in the 16th century, modified in the 17th and 19th. The The Pistols Act of 1903 banned handguns, further Acts in 1920, 1937 and 1968 codified this until the 'Dublane Amendment in 1997.







    You would be surprised how many have been affected by edged weapon crime, something that is actually very old here, it's not a new thing. What is new is children carrying knives and other edged weapons. It is actually a bigger problem than many imagine but affects certain parts of the population more than others, for those it affects the consequences are horrendous.

    https://www.crimeandjustice.org.uk/sites/crimeandjustice.org.uk/files/ccjs_knife_report.pdf
     
  6. pdg

    pdg Senior Master

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2018
    Messages:
    2,542
    Likes Received:
    671
    Trophy Points:
    213
    I think 'banned' is actually the wrong word now I consider it.

    'Restricted' and 'further restricted' is far more suitable.

    For instance, I used to be able to go target shooting with a handgun (a lot later than 1903), but due to further restrictions introduced in the 90s that's no longer 'good reason'.

    Same with knives - yes, they should be restricted so you don't carry one down the pub. No, I shouldn't be restricted from carrying one at work (I almost had a 2" keychain lock knife confiscated - I was working at a vacant house, police got called by a neighbour "there's someone in the garden" - there was the suggestion that little knife was more dangerous than the 14" curved pullsaw I had in my hand or the 12" top handle chainsaw I had in the car...)

    I'm not denying knife crime happens, but blanket bans aren't the way forward imo - when I were a lad literally everyone carried a knife of some sort - it was standard carry for a boy scout (knife, bit of string, 10p for the phone box). Loads of people got in scraps, nobody pulled a blade...

    Maybe I'm too country ;)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    16,980
    Likes Received:
    4,878
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    That was the situation in the Southern US when I grew up. I probably never went to school a single day without a knife in my pocket, and I was far from the only one. I only ever heard of one knife incident at school, and that was secondhand (and seems apocryphal as I look back).
     
  8. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    25,664
    Likes Received:
    4,022
    Trophy Points:
    308
    Location:
    England

    Probably lol.
    My father is 90 and when he was growing up in Scotland, knives were common for fighting with. A Glasgow smile was a terrible thing, a huge initiative by the Scottish parliament and Police Scotland is reducing the appalling knife violence there. Work to reduce violence and knife crime

    The rest of the country isn't far behind and again it's not a new thing, I assume you've seen Peaky Blinders, based on real life gangs. Violent attacks by people with knives isn't a new thing but it is escalating,

    You don't need more than an inch of blade with which to kill someone. My instructor got stabbed while tending a patient during the ambulance strikes, small blade in the back, he didn't realise until someone noticed the blood pouring out, he would have died from blood loss very quickly otherwise.

    People are always citing how they carried knives, it was fine and now they can't, well the truth is they can still carry them and it is still fine for the most part. Carrying for work isn't a problem, you were checked because the police didn't know you, had a report of a suspected break in etc. Scouts ( and Guides btw) can still carry knives to camp, people can carry penknives, fishing knives etc etc etc. A lot of information the UK public get is from the tabloids which is never good.
     
  9. pdg

    pdg Senior Master

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2018
    Messages:
    2,542
    Likes Received:
    671
    Trophy Points:
    213
    I had no problems with being checked, rather that than getting ignored.

    I couldn't help but laugh when he found the penknife in my glovebox and looked worried / started saying he should take it though, considering what was in my hand (I think he was new, bless, his obvious superior who I was talking to at the time wasn't concerned in the slightest and it looked like he found it mildly humourous too).

    I personally think a lot depends on where and how you're carrying as well - me as an almost middle aged kid out in the country is a totally different situation to a hooded teenager in the middle of town - it's just that the letter of the law doesn't differentiate.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. taistrong

    taistrong White Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2018
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    It's the law that's restricting. People might use it for idiotic purposes. And nunchucks are fairly easy to get the hang of.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

selling nunchucks