What martial art is best for a beginner, petite female working in a risky industry?

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by Whispered_Freedom, Jan 18, 2019.

  1. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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    @Whispered_Freedom

    There's no such thing as becoming a good martial artist with minimal effort. You must train hard to be good. No magic, just training.

    However, there are some arts which you might want to look into:

    First off, boxing. Learning movement, range, and timing in addition to making the most of what a small frame can deliver impact-wise is always good. Plus, the limited number of tools used makes for the best ratio of time in to fighting effectiveness I can think of. It's also really fun.

    Secondly, MMA training. You'll learn a little bit of everything, so very little an unarmed person can throw at you will be a surprise. By being exposed to fairly wide range of disciplines, you'll be able to figure out what you're naturally good at too.

    Lastly, I'll chime in for one of the arts i train in, Judo. Learning how to manipulate someone via their clothing is pretty handy. The ground work is similar to, but different than BJJ. In judo, ground fighting has a time limit, so it tends to be more focused on what works quickly. It's less of a chess match, in other words, and more of a scramble. Not do discredit BJJ or Catch Wrestling, since the ground game of both those arts is much broader than what the average judoka learns. The judo ground game is perfectly effective and functional for most purposes though. Also, judo's use of pins might be useful for restraining of recalcitrant clients.

    Just my two cents. :)
     
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  2. KenpoMaster805

    KenpoMaster805 Purple Belt

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    I recommend american kenpo karate
     
  3. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    Big surprise
     
  4. Gweilo

    Gweilo Brown Belt

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    I reckon that was an ad lol
     
  5. Gaucho

    Gaucho Yellow Belt

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    Judo + eye-jabs + kicks to the crotch (and to the throat when the attacker is bent over.) Military-type jiu-jitsu would cover it. You don't need a syllabus of 80 techniques, you need to be good at a very few techniques. Judo skills are very useful, and turning sport judo into combat judo is easy. In fact, combat judo is the easier of the two: when you throw an attacker, you just release him and let him hit the floor at full speed.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2019
  6. Gaucho

    Gaucho Yellow Belt

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    A man's legs are on average about twice as strong as his arms. A woman's legs are about four times as strong as her arms. Put another way, women's arms are relatively weak compared to a man's arms, when compared to leg strength in each gender. Women should kick, eye-jab, and run if possible. We all should.
     
  7. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I've heard various numbers for that, for both genders. I think it's obvious that legs are stronger than arms, but do you have any sources actually suggesting the 2-1 ratio for men and 4-1 ratio for women?
     
  8. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    we have had this on average argument before, with out anyone actual coming up with the average then claims exists.

    but a by definition a trained ma is not average, an " average " women who trains can easily double her strength,whic, may well close the gap with our a average male or even exceed it and then with have the multiplycation effect of sound technique ,but that's the same predicament that small skinny males face
     
  9. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Beyond that, not even worrying about whether or not the person in question is "average", as far as i know there's no stats actually stating what the ratio for any woman/man is, average or not.
     
  10. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    That may be true, but she would no longer be an average woman. She would be an exception to normal.
     
  11. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    but all ma are\ should be an exception to the norm or why do it ? she would however continue to be average in other respects, so still ( nearly ) average
     
  12. Fedora

    Fedora White Belt

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    Basically, I don't think what you're looking for exists. That's why they make knives and guns.

    If, however, you wished to learn how a small woman, given a little effort and commitment, might defend herself, I'd recommend you look towards martial arts indigenous to smaller adults. Indonesian people, for example, or perhaps Filipino.

    As another possibility, I've heard (but have no personal knowledge) that the Machado Brothers BJJ schools sometimes offer a short course on street defense. That might be something for you, if a school is convenient. The school should not be too far away, as you will still have to practice what you learned.

    Sidebar on aikido: I think it's best to think of aikido as the unarmed equivalent of a J-frame revolver. In the proper hands either one can be indistinguishable from Harry Potter's wand, but they are the tools of experts and neither should be a padwan's first choice.
     
  13. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Anecdotally I would suggest not even close.

    The average male fighting ability would be pretty low.
     
  14. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    I did say should, the problem with a lot of ma clubs, if they attract people who can't fight to even a moderate standard in the first place and then because of lack luster physical training, iffy techniques and a lack of actual competition they continue to be below a reasonable average level of ability despite many years of training. this despite the fact they develop a level of delusion about their actual abilities As seen not infrequently on posts here

    it really doesn't have to be that way, but yes I accept it is
     
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  15. skyeisonfire

    skyeisonfire Green Belt

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    Learning a good mix of everything and conditioning yourself i.e. isometric exercises or overall strength conditioning will not hurt in any situation. I've seen smaller women than me could lift double my weight, so the potential is there for any women who applies focus, dedication, and education with her training to develop skills.
     
  16. Martial D

    Martial D Senior Master

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    Sure, being fit always helps. Yet, even if you are in peak physical shape at 120 pounds give or take...man or woman for that matter..you are fairly screwed if a 200 pound plus man gets ahold of you and you don't know how to grapple...and even then...

    Size and strength are huge advantages across the board.
     
  17. skyeisonfire

    skyeisonfire Green Belt

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    That's why you avoid it in the first place
     
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  18. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    size ( either weight or height it both) and strength don't necessarily go together, unless your big person actively trains strength or has strength job, in a ring contest you can make a reasonable assumption that not only is he or she a foot taller, 60 lbs heavier they also train strength to some extent, in the wider world that far from true

    they are far more likely to just be bigger but have less strength than you, if you do train and they dont. being big with out the strength to move that weight makes you slow across the ground and to turn, how fight unfolds then us dependent on not letting them use the weight against you, if you end up on the floor pinned by their weight, your in trouble, whilst in motion you have the advantage of both speed and strengh

    in myh early 20s I got into a lot of fights with people who were substantially heavier than I, nearly every one was heavier me, I was 150 lbs soaking wet, this seldom seemed to matter much, in fact being tall and supper skinny seemed to be the cause if most if these fights, people making the mistake of thinking they could push me about, particularly if they couldn't see my Bruce lee type figure under my leather jacket,
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2019
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  19. Rat

    Rat 2nd Black Belt

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    Isnt that a effort for anyone in grappling? if someone who is heavier and/or stronger than you and taller than you gets into grappling range? At least if you do striking if you clock them with enough force on the jaw you can induce a concussion on them, so long as you can generate enough force to get said effect and hit their jaw.


    I just know i think thats something some pretty decent grapples struggle with, especially if they just know enough to sufficiently defend themselves in it. Of course its not a perfect world and fighting is a struggle anyway and you can loose even if you have the upper hand and all that.

    More directed at your BJJ giving the best chance to a small woman post. Obviously a trained fit female could probably whoop a unfit and untrained male. Actually i think they would, but always a chance to loose if you fight anyone its the nature of it.

    Actually someone answer this question for me, is body building the most common strength athletes? I swear that type of exercising has become a hobby for a lot of people. Just more probability wise of what you would end up fighting on averages, or dealing with. Preparing for your average clientele you will deal with is probably the only thing you can do.

    Anyway kind of rambly i hope i made some decent points in that.
     
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  20. skyeisonfire

    skyeisonfire Green Belt

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    I agreed..I don't care about the odds.. if I know what I'm facing..I'll be smart and avoid at all costs, however, if the situation is beyond my control, at least I'm confident enough to know I have a fighting chance to at least get away due to my accumulated training and fitness level. As always, it's about learning the environment and using the common sense approach.
     

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