WC Footwork and Mobility

Discussion in 'Wing Chun' started by TMA17, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    A little off topick: Interesting technique to deal with the thrust punch. The only problem is that thrust punches aren't thrown like that in application. They are usually mixed in with a series of other punches and kicks. It's a much closer range punch than what it looks like when drilled. I have never thrown a thrust punch from that distance. My understanding of the thrust punch is that it works off the concept that even if you retreat you'll still get it. If I was a Wing Chun person I would probably train to work that technique with a boxer low jab. The only reason I mentioned this is because the footwork will be off. You would need to use different footwork to deal with a thrust punch and the technique that is shown will most likely not be the same for thrust punch. The footwork looks valid for what is shown but I'm pretty sure it would change if the punch was thrown realistically. I understand they can on work with what they have. Other than the footwork looks solid from someone on the outside of WC


    I watched some of their other videos and came across this one. Students like the one at 3:49 are awesome to have. They step out of that "one punch" training that I don't like. They move around and change things up and that's where you can see the real footwork vs the training and drilling footwork. At 3:49 you can see his footwork shuffle and his stance is longer. The same guy that moves around lengthens his stance as well at 4:31

     
  2. geezer

    geezer Grandmaster

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    Yes!
     
  3. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    At 0.06, his right leg is between his opponent's legs, his left leg then move to the outside of his opponent's right leg. This will open his groin area for his opponent's right leg. Even his opponent leans back, his opponent's right leg can still kick out. I have not seen this kind of footwork that exist in other MA systems. You either move through your opponent's front door, or you move through his side door. It doesn't make sense to move right leg into your opponent's front door and then move left leg into his side door.

    Here is an example - He leans his body back. Your punch cannot reach to his head, but his leg can still reach to your groin.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. wckf92

    wckf92 Master Black Belt

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    is the posture above a training posture in CMA? Or a method of kicking? We have something similar in my WC.
     
  5. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    For some kicks, you lean your upper body forward to add your body weight behind your kick. For some kicks, you lean your upper body back to avoid punch when you kick back. To lean upper body back as far as you can is part of this training. It just prove that even if your opponent's body is leaning back, he can still kick.
     
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  6. obi_juan_salami

    obi_juan_salami Orange Belt

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    Hi there thanks for the comment. You are right however these clips are mostly taken of students drilling the techniques not against what i guess you would call 'live' attacks which we do practice as well. The footwork remains the same thought and is versitile, closing in should the opponent retreat etc.
     
  7. obi_juan_salami

    obi_juan_salami Orange Belt

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    It might be hard to see in the video but the knees are kept close together protecting the groin. Also, everytime you move no matyer the technoque or position you are open in one way or another. Its up to your training and skill to cover those gaps should you need to.
     
  8. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Of course this is just for discussion.

    If he uses his

    - right shin bone to press against the inside of his opponent's right leg, or
    - left shin bone to press against the outside of his opponent's right leg,

    he can avoid that concern. The WC YJKYM can be used to do that job - build leg bridge. I believe we are talking about 100% WC technique here.
     
  9. obi_juan_salami

    obi_juan_salami Orange Belt

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    Of course that is an option as well. One of many
     
  10. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    In WC thread, we have talked a lot about "sticky hand". We don't talk much about "sticky leg". It's the same principle.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2017
  11. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    I saw that as well. It becomes a risk if someone lifts their knee to help maintain distance. I just blew it off and assumed the strikes were strong enough to knock the person of balance or that the strikes trigger the body's natural response to turn away.

    It's difficult for me to tell because there is no foot work from the demo guy. He just stands there and take it and doesn't make any effort to evade. I guess it's a down side to demos.
     
  12. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    Muay Tai teeps are like that.
     
  13. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    I'll see if I have any videos that show a thrust punch in action. Then you can imitate the distance and the punch. From there you can see if your footwork changes.
     
  14. obi_juan_salami

    obi_juan_salami Orange Belt

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    Sounds good
     
  15. DaveB

    DaveB Master Black Belt

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    The stuff they are doing is only working because they know what's coming.

    When I think of wing chun footwork this is the opposite of what I think of in that it's reactive. Proactive positioning is IMO key to making close southern kung fu work.
     
  16. obi_juan_salami

    obi_juan_salami Orange Belt

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    Some are techniques being drilled so yes they know whats coming. But there are parts of the video where it is completely random. We also train with random attacks and the footwork works. Flattering actually that you think its all rehersed haha
     
  17. DaveB

    DaveB Master Black Belt

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    It was meant as niether flattery nor criticism, simply a point about what is shown in the video.

    They may not always be pre set exercises, but you must be able to see how the staging is very different to free fighting?

    Reading what is coming from a static opponent and knowing there'll be no follow through is very different to how one will hopefully go on to employ that footwork.
     
  18. TMA17

    TMA17 Black Belt

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  19. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    Best explanation I've seen in a long time.
     
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  20. KPM

    KPM Senior Master

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    Not bad! But he does make one wrong statement. He says something to the effect that "Wing Chun pivots on the heels not on the toes. We want to spin the guy away, not move away from him." In my Wing Chun we pivot on the K1 point near the balls of the feet. But we still keep a 50/50 weight distro and are not moving away from the opponent. We can "spin the guy away" just as easily as someone pivoting on the heels. And if you think about it, to pivot on the heels means you have to have more weight back on your heels. And if you are receiving the guy's incoming pressure just prior to "spinning" him away, the more weight that is back on your heels at the time the more risk you run of being off-balanced yourself. A football lineman does not meet the rush of the opposing line when the ball is snapped by being back on his heels! ;)

    As far as when to use a sidestep vs. the pivot when dealing with an on-rushing opponent.....this depends upon timing and distance, which I don't think he talked about much at all. If the opponent is at a little bit of distance away from you, then you can time your movement and sidestep AS you engage and pivot. In my Wing Chun, the sidestep IS a pivot. This gets you off the line of his rush AS you spin him away. If done right there is no way he can "track" you. But if you are already engaged with the opponent and he is right in front of you then you may not have time to do much of a sidestep. So as you feel his incoming force, you pivot to "roll it off."
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2017
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