was the instructor trying injure me?

Discussion in 'Boxing/Kickboxing' started by jeff_78632, May 5, 2019.

  1. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    I think most people do pads wrong anyway. Which is why people then hit slow and doughy.

    You are trying to get fast crisp impact. You are not trying to knock the pad back.


     
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  2. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    Jeff, I hope you jump back into this thread. Welcome to the forum. I agree with the general theme that pad work is intended for the striker too practice full power. Maybe the instructor is a jerk, I have no clue. You either need to have a conversation with them or someone in class you trust to see if you are doing something wrong with how you are holding the pad. I have seen more than a few people cause themselves bruises by being really aggressive with how they hold the target. You need to learn how to hold a good solid target but shed the power when possible. I have also seen worn Thai pads that are equal to no pad at all. I remember many times going through the stack of pads looking for the ones that were not flat in the middle. I prefer DOUBLE paddle targets over Thai pads for body work if I trust my partner not to miss too much. I feel they hold up much better and absorb the contact better.
    Remember, it isn't ballet class.;) I couldn't resist.
     
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  3. jeff_78632

    jeff_78632 White Belt

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    finding out now i prefer bjj to mt. i find the people in bjj more reserve and peaceful than MT crowd. bjj also more safer. might end up doing judo at rec centre. way cheaper than these mma schools.
    i got big bruise on back of my forearm. next time going pick a smaller person as partner. i got few more weeks and my contract is fiished
     
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  4. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I hate to break it to you, but you will get bruised in BJJ as well.
     
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  5. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Back of the forearm also means he is holding pads wrong.
     
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  6. Jaeimseu

    Jaeimseu 2nd Black Belt

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    I tend to see everything through a school owner’s lense. Also, I’m not typically training “fighters.” I don’t want students quitting over stuff like this in their first few months.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    Yeah I've currently got bruised ribs because a guy about 10 stone heavier than me mounted me and dropped his weight right on me
     
  8. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    Lol bjj is definetley not safer. Maybe when it comes to concussions there's less but even then you can still get concussed in bjj. When your in that tight with someone it's easy for a knee or elbow to hit your head. Plus your getting your limbs yanked so it's easy to get injured on your arms, legs, neck etc, you can also get choked unconscious if your not careful.

    If you don't like bruises you won't like bjj. I've had more bruises and injuries from bjj than Muay Thai.

    You got a bruise? Okay you got a bruise so what? Trust me you're going to get a lot worse in bjj
     
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  9. MetalBoar

    MetalBoar Green Belt

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    Yeah, I'm not even so sure there are fewer concussions in BJJ. I know a friend of mine who picked up BJJ after years of Muay Thai and boxing said that he felt BJJ was riskier in that regard than Muay Thai. Not that he thought it was particularly unsafe nor that it would keep him from doing BJJ, just that he felt that it was something to pay attention to in his training.
     
  10. Rat

    Rat 2nd Black Belt

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    Maybe so, but if you cause someone to have a dead arm and thus to stop for 5 minuets, thats 5 minuets of pad work you don't get, despite the issue of its not your body and all that.

    Should really be a break in period for pad work and only go a comfortable speed for both parties, they don't have to stand there and go through it and would ironically be paying to go through it. Some people can tolerate it more and all that and they might not be in the mood to get a dead arm through pad work that day and so on.

    Still seems two fold a respect point and a training period point. Not undermining some actual pain being inflicted via holding a pad, but if its your first day kind of steep to hold one for a the equal of a black belt for 30 minuets with little in the respect of breaks per say.
     
  11. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    No one holds pads for 30 minutes non stop.....that never happens the very most is about 10 minutes if your doing 5 continuous rounds maybe and even then you get a 1 minute break in between.

    Also why would you need a 5 minute break for a dead arm? A minute would be enough to shake it off and carry on
     
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  12. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    Depends on the gym. If a Muay Thai gym spars daily they're more likely to pick up concusion than a bjj school that focuses on drills more than rolling. But yeah most Muay Thai gyms mix up the sparring with pads and bag work and drills.

    I know an Mma fighter who had to pull out w match because he got concussion. Not from Mma sparring but from bjj rolling where he took a knee to the need off a guy on the bottom
     
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  13. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm confused by this thread in general, both the OP and some of the responses. Why would you expect not to experience any pain when learning to fight?
     
  14. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    Not not just martial arts. You'll get pain from doing any type of sport. Football, tennis, golf or whatever there'll be some sort of pain. Tiger woods has made major knee surgery, had shoulder injuries amongst other stuff so of course your going to get a few knocks in martial arts but as long as it's not putting you in hospital or a position you can't go to work then who cares
     
  15. W.Bridges

    W.Bridges Yellow Belt

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  16. thanson02

    thanson02 Blue Belt

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    There are a lot of reasons why an instructor would not come by and give you pointers in a class. Sometimes it is because he gets swamped with other students. It also depends on how big your class is. Maybe the lesson for you in that class is that it is hard to be in a fight if you are not able to take a hit. I am not saying that to be mean, but you will get hit when you fight and that is just a reality of what we do. Whether you realize it or not, he was actually being kind. At least he was using pads and not having you kick a tree with rope wrapped around it (yup, that is a conditioning drill with some arts).

    If there was bruising, use standard first aid methods for handling bruises, and accept that you will have this happen again. If anything, make the conditioning to take a hit a challenge to step up to. Eventually the bruising will stop and those kicks will not seem bad at all. :cool:
     
  17. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    I’m going to play devil’s advocate for a minute here...

    New students should be taught how to properly hold pads. It shouldn’t be “here hold this” and let more advanced students tee off on you.

    And the person hitting the pads should know if the guy doesn’t know what he’s doing, then he shouldn’t be teeing off on the pads either.

    Just like everything else, there’s a progression.

    But yeah, expect bumps and bruises. Expect that people are going to occasionally hurt you, within reason. Expect you’re going to hurt others, within reason. To quote the great Sensei Kreese: This is a dojo, not a knitting class.
     
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  18. JP3

    JP3 Master Black Belt

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  19. JP3

    JP3 Master Black Belt

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    Buka I was going to suggest a pink gi… I didn't even think of the man bun. excellent.

    We used to call snowflakes twinkies. Similar concept, different generation's word..
     
  20. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    Those are important points. New students should be taught everything that has to do with training, especially holding pads or assisting anyone in anything. These things should be taught with the same care and detail as anything else - rules, principles, techniques, whatever.

    I also believe students should be taught to help and support each other, to lift each other up, to have each other's back.

    And sparring....I'm always the first person each and every one of my students spars with. I want to show them the rules and make sure they know them. I want to show them the difference in power with every technique, the etiquettes involved, the differences between bag work, air work, shield work and sparring.

    If we don't show them ourselves, who's going to show them? Other white belts?
     
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