Trouble with my WC school

Discussion in 'Wing Chun' started by trolloc63, Feb 7, 2018.

  1. trolloc63

    trolloc63 White Belt

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    Some special thing called funny money that he wants me to buy for sifu. Some thing you get at one of those Asian outfitter stores. No idea what it is.
     
  2. wckf92

    wckf92 Master Black Belt

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    Funny money? Or Lucky Money? I think the latter is presented in a special red envelope with cold hard cash inside(?)
     
  3. trolloc63

    trolloc63 White Belt

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    To answer your question, I was interested in 2 different styles at one point. Aikido and WC. The Aikido fell through after trying different schools. I found it to be very impractical on how it was taught in this area. That's when I tried WC. Seeing how there is only 1 school here, I'm kind of stuck on either doing it or not.

    I have no idea what I'm going to do at this point. I started Aikido because I thought it would be somewhat practical. Be seeing is believing for me. Watching Steven Segal is one thing. But actually watching online vids of Aikido working in real life is another. Thus, I left Aikido.

    So for WC, I saw online classes and vids of both Master Wong and Sifu Mark Phillips. These seemed to be very practical. But here again, I'm not going to get that here in Nebraska. I'm going to get the traditional stuff only.
     
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  4. TMA17

    TMA17 Purple Belt

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    It's "Lucky Money" (Hung Bo) not funny money. It's traditional to show respect. It's also given during celebrations or ceremonies.
     
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  5. trolloc63

    trolloc63 White Belt

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    yeah, lucky money
     
  6. TMA17

    TMA17 Purple Belt

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    You can either leave the art and find something more "fight" oriented with more sparring/aliveness, or learn the structure and traditional approach and take that and make it your own. WC is new to me so I understand where you're coming from.
     
  7. trolloc63

    trolloc63 White Belt

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    I am planning to take up boxing very soon. So perhaps that will be a good compromise. I just have a hard time with the soft structure bit, and relaxing. I dont feel the soft structure will stop hard punches on the street. But again, i'm a noobtard.
     
  8. TMA17

    TMA17 Purple Belt

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    I understand your dilemma. I love boxing too. It's simple and effective. Also consider WC can look and be applied this way:



    You do have to step in and bang with WC and most schools don't seem to stress that. In WC, you turn your body into a bundle of attack reflexes. In a real fight, all you have to do is react.
     
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  9. trolloc63

    trolloc63 White Belt

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    Good stuff. After watching too many Sifu Phillips and Master Wong vids, I do believe that WC can be made practical. This supports these arguments. The problem in my eyes, is getting to that close range distance.
     
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  10. jks9199

    jks9199 Administrator Staff Member

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    Okay... Not going back to pull the original post and subsequent replies in, because I'm being a little lazy.

    First, rates and pro-rating, money in general... $90 doesn't seem bad at all. It seems like you have several training opportunities each week, so if you broke it down into a per class fee, I'm guessing you're looking at under $10 a class... Pro-rating? Well, that sucks, but may not be practical, or it's simply run as a club, and the fees are your monthly dues, whether you join on the 1st or the 31st. There may be rent, insurance, gear... in short, the owner has bills to pay. Buying gear from the school may help support the school -- or simply ensures that students have the right gear in the instructor's eyes. The Lucky Money thing? It's cultural. Someone should have explained it better to you... but if someone's pressuring me for extra money -- I'm going to ask questions until I do understand why.

    Second, the master not teaching much... Can't say. I was incredibly fortunate to have a master instructor that had no business teaching beginners teach me from day one. It's not uncommon for masters to have advanced students teach beginner classes so that they can focus on teaching the advanced material. In fact, sometimes, it's hard for a master instructor to teach beginners because they have to suppress much of what they do, and really focus on bringing out the fundamentals. Not everyone can be "backwards compatible" that way... There may also be other reasons -- health, personal life, full time job... If you're concerned, discuss it with the senior student... and perhaps, then, the master.

    Third, "offering tips." This ties into your assessment of the school's quality, and other arts. Who the hell are you to offer tips, to disrupt the class, or assess a style that you're just beginning in? How many decades of training, what sort of experience do you have to judge? As I read your experience in wing chun -- the most "advice" you should be offering your classmates is "gee, it looked to me like sihung Joe did this..." You read like a dabbler and a guy who spends a lot of time on internet videos. Settle down, take your time, and actually learn something before you try to make it more, or infuse your own interpretation on it. Maybe I'm wrong -- but that's how you're coming across.
     
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  11. wayfaring

    wayfaring Green Belt

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    I'm over in Colorado. I have a brother in St. Louis area. If you are ever traveling welcome to stop by.
     
  12. pdg

    pdg 3rd Black Belt

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    Me too!

    The 'watered down' aspect - how long have you being doing it?

    I have no knowledge of WC specifically but in any art you start somewhere. It has to be watered down to begin with because frankly you don't have a clue.

    And you compare it to other arts and the way they apply techniques - then try to 'advise' on how other students apply techniques, using your probably very incorrect and influenced opinion. Shut up and listen.

    You say you want to learn the traditional art, gain competency then change it to make it your own - honestly that's a childish view. How on earth do you know you need to change anything?

    You seem much like all those YouTube idiots claiming to be making their own blended versions because the 3 weeks they did in 4 different arts didn't seem 'tactical' enough...
     
  13. acleitao

    acleitao White Belt

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    Ok... I just create an account to answer to this... no offenses and no hard feelings. I don't have a deep knowledge of wing chun but... As far as I know... wing chun is a system and it accepts modifications. What I heard for the same moy yat family representant (I started at that branch) we suppose to learn the whole system to then internalize it and modify if we need it (of course keeping the basics intact)

    About the watered down... I'm sorry buddy its not watering down... if you compare with other arts like taekwondo, bjj and all other stuff you will only get frustrated. Again all in favor of sparring, pressure on chi saw... and actually we have that in our club... but... far... far... far.. away what i had in taekwondo ... its different... give it a try... wait few months... you are not preparing yourself to get in a UFC tomorrow... don't need to rush it... you will understand that the basics make it better... you can't just start sparring without any previous experience with the art... (I tried... wasn't good... i didn't know what the hell i should do)

    and I will agree with everybody... unless some one asks... and without your sifu or instructor permission don't give hints or tips... about any techniques... its just not polite.
     
  14. wingchun100

    wingchun100 Senior Master

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    I am going to break this down how I see it.

    1) While martial arts schools do need to make money to pay the rent, I don't get a good feeling from full-price for only half a month. Imagine paying full price at McDonald's, and they give you half a cheeseburger.

    2) As for the merchandise push...that is capitalism at work. Pay it no mind.

    3) Hmm...why is the Sifu hardly ever there?

    4) The one who actually teaches is not a model of fitness? I wouldn't worry about that. I have a pot belly myself, but I still know my stuff.

    5) You can't give tips to your classmates. Why is that? Is it because they feel you are too new at it to be able to provide tips, or is it something else? The Sifu I used to train with did that. Once, while doing Chi Sao with someone new to it, I gave them a tip. He overheard it and took me outside the class to say, "I am glad you are making so many advancements, but those are for YOU...not anyone else." I thought, "What is so wrong about wanting to help my Wing Chun brothers and sisters advance too???"
     
  15. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    I agree with what he said to you your advancements are yours they work for you because you figured that works for you. Students need to figure out what works for themselves everyone is different. My late instructor had a saying. He said everyone has the right to do their techniques differently as long as they can say why but when it comes to teaching everyone needs to be on the same page or it'll cause confusion for students. Also I hate quoting movies but this one sticks out for me in the forbidden Kingdom "learn the way then find your own way" basically yes you can do your own changes but you have to learn the base first. Like a writer has to learn the alphabet and basic words before he can have his own unique writing style.
     
  16. wingchun100

    wingchun100 Senior Master

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    I disagree with it because I think we can all learn from each other. Yes, it was MY "aha" moment, but mine could lead someone else to theirs. Also, the student I shared this with was not 100% new to Chi Sao. I mean, I could understand it if it was the first time he had let this particular person in on it, but it wasn't. And not for nothing, but if it is my moment, then I feel it is mine to share as I see fit. I'll share it with the guy standing at the bus stop talking to himself if I feel like it. LOL
     

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