The best way to hold a staff

Discussion in 'General Weapons Discussion' started by Midnight-shadow, Mar 31, 2017.

  1. DanT

    DanT Black Belt

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    Recovery if your weapon gets knocked into the air, you can catch it and counter quickly.
     
  2. DanT

    DanT Black Belt

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    I agree but often times in traditional styles the spins and throws are about recovery of the weapon if you lose it.
     
  3. CB Jones

    CB Jones Senior Master

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    Seems like you would be better off using that time focusing on weapon retention and grip.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Xue Sheng

    Xue Sheng All weight is underside

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    Never found any of the ways to hold a staff uncomfortable, but these two are likely most common

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    I won't answer for Xue, but will suggest a better way to look at it once again is the overall methodology, which would include specifics on grip.

    IF THe method speaks to you, likely you will find the grip makes sense in that context.

    I know a couple methods of staff, both gripping at one end to use the full length of the weapon. One of these methods does a lot of switching from one end to the other, but still using the full length. The other method pretty much stays at the same end of the staff all the way through. The grip is different for each of these methods. Within their own context, they make sense and are comfortable.
     
  6. CB Jones

    CB Jones Senior Master

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    Just an observation.

    It seems like that would be great while your opponent is kept outside at distance but would be problematic once your opponent gets inside of the staffs reach.
     
  7. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    Well, a staff is a long weapon. There are places and circumstances in which it becomes less useful.

    But a good method will also include ways to shift and change the grip and allow for a changing range.

    As I keep saying, there should be a complete picture with the staff method. It isn't just an unchanging grip. You can't take one aspect of the method, such as the grip, and put it into a vacuum. Context is very important and flexibility exists to meet changing demands.
     
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  8. CB Jones

    CB Jones Senior Master

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    Agree. That's why to me it would only be smart to know how to use a staff held at different positions depending on the actions of the fight instead of studying one particular position.

    So in reality....there is no best method, just multiple methods.
     
  9. Xue Sheng

    Xue Sheng All weight is underside

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    this is of course assuming that this is a static posture and neither the position of the staff or the hand positioning can change ;)
     
  10. DanT

    DanT Black Belt

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    It may seem that way yes, but being able to recover from a bad position or being able to catch a weapon in mid-flight is, in terms of weapon combat, a useful skill. Being able to retain the weapon is obviously important, but being able to recover is also important I would say.
     
  11. CB Jones

    CB Jones Senior Master

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    No offense but I find it hard to believe that while fighting an adversary you are going to catch your weapon that has been knocked out of your hand while fighting.

    If the weapon has been knocked out of your hand....you are being actively engaged by your opponent. No way you are fending him off and catching that weapon.

    And practicing catching a weapon that was knocked from your hands seems futile since you have no idea where it will be knocked to.
     
  12. DanT

    DanT Black Belt

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    I believe it has to deal with coordination with the weapon when you have limited control over it. Again it's about recovery, not just catching weapons, although that is part of the skill. The catching of a weapon doesn't have to be your own, it could be one that your buddy could be throwing to you (just as an example). I understand that it sounds stupid, but you have to remember that these are skills from a long time ago where fighting with weapons was much more common.
     
  13. CB Jones

    CB Jones Senior Master

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    But I don't think a long time ago they were using 4 oz glow in the dark glittery toothpick bos that they threw high in the air while they did their best Michael Jackson spin. :D
     
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  14. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    The staff is also called "2 heads snake". When you hold on the 1/3 and 2/3 spot, if you release your

    - left hand, your staff can hit 2/3 staff length to your right.
    - right hand, your staff can hit 2/3 staff length to your left.

    This way, you can attack your opponent with both end of your staff. Even you don't release your hand, you can use one side to hit your opponent's upper body, and use the other side to hit your opponent's low body.

    [​IMG]

     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2017
  15. DanT

    DanT Black Belt

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    Haha probably not LOL
     
  16. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    Hold it like this. Then hit 'em hard.
     

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  17. Midnight-shadow

    Midnight-shadow 3rd Black Belt

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    I understand completely where you are coming from, thanks. Does Tibetan Crane use a staff? If so, what is the methodology behind their use of it?
     
  18. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    We do, we use a method that keeps the grip at one end of the staff, but we may shift from one end to the other and alternate ends in that way. The grip may also shift from it being palms facing each other, to palms both facing down/away. The methodology is consistent with how we use a full body connection to generate our power. The staff follows that same methodology, and the grips and how/when/why we change the grip is in line with our overarching method. I haven't learned the entir system but I've seen most of it, and I haven't seen any staff that deliberately holds the staff in the middle and keeps that kind of grip to fight from there. We tend to feel that when you have a long weapon, you should use that reach and distance.
     
  19. Xue Sheng

    Xue Sheng All weight is underside

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  20. Midnight-shadow

    Midnight-shadow 3rd Black Belt

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    Is Xingyi related to Wudang, because that form looks very similar to a Wudang Tai He form that I have a video of.
     

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