Stress Test - We may not push ourselves hard enough

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by Kung Fu Wang, Feb 22, 2018.

  1. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    15,451
    Likes Received:
    4,352
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    I actually have trouble getting my heart rate into normal target ranges. I always have. If I run hard enough to get myself fully out of breath after just a mile, I'm still not in "target" range for cardio.
     
  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    15,451
    Likes Received:
    4,352
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    Not all exercise has the same purpose.
     
  3. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    537
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    well you not running fast enough, run as far as you can in five mins, if the last minute doesn't have you gasping for air and your heart beating like a drum, then run it faster next time and,again until it does. When your 5 minutes equals your mile, then you are pretty much there and knocking another min off will see you in the Olympics trials

    its ether you have an incredible heart capacity OR your legs,arnt developed enough to get/ maintain the speed that puts your heart into the zone, burn off the glycogen and the oxygen in you blood and then do a minute
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2018
  4. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2002
    Messages:
    3,482
    Likes Received:
    1,737
    Trophy Points:
    238
    Location:
    New Iberia, Louisiana USA
    Just maybe my metabolic equivalent is excellent.
    You do realize walking your dog is considered a moderate intensity exercise? Doing housework, cleaning up, gardening, light jog is moderate intensity. Or maybe you don't.

    Per the Mayo Clinic:
    Pushing a lawn mower, swimming, aerobics, Kickboxing rounds and such are considered Vigorous/High intensity exercises being 75-85% of your max heart rate.
     
  5. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    537
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    dog walking for some people is, medium for others its high and for those like us, its a walk in the park( see what i did there)

    you can only judge. Your intensity off yourself, but the rule of thumb applies, what ever you can do for more than a full min is not high intensity, id argue that 30 seconds is a more accurate guide, if you push your lawn mower to the point of exhaustion, then do another minute, then your taking, but that only a minute of high intensity, the other 3 hours don't count
     
  6. skribs

    skribs Master of Arts

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Messages:
    1,506
    Likes Received:
    271
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Location:
    Lakewood, WA
    My Dad wears his heartrate monitor in Taekwondo class. He gets two major spikes - one during forms and one during sparring (the later is much higher).

    The forms we use are more traditional forms which include deeper stances. If you have properly deep stances and proper explosion in your technique, you should be able to get your heartrate up pretty high during the forms, even if your form is fairly basic. For example, our basic form #4 is basically block, kick, punch on some lines, and then a series of block-punch combinations with a stance change. Total of 20 steps, 34 total techniques. But it gets your heartrate up if you have proper stances and snap power.

    Taekwondo sparring is just insane for the heartrate because there's a lot of kicks and we tend to bounce, and kicks use a lot more energy than most other techniques.
     
  7. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    15,451
    Likes Received:
    4,352
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    It seems to be more a differential between my heart and my lungs, frankly. I get out of breath with a much lower heart rate than most folks, and I don't seem to get out of breath drastically earlier than they do. Mind you, my legs' ability does factor in, but not enough to account for the discrepancy.

    Could also be an issue with the monitors I've used. I need to try one of the chest straps someday and see if it tells a different story.
     
  8. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    537
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    you seem to be not appreciating the biological forces at work here¿. whilst you have sufficient oxygen for your work load your heart rate will not increase markedly, its the difficulty in metabolising enough oxygen that increases it. Once you start painting to increase your oxygen intake your heart rate increases to get the oxygen to the muscles quicker.

    what your saying is,a,special case. For you, is just what everybody experiences. If you want to increase your heart rate towards the top level, first run till you are painting and,screaming for oxygen, which is seemingly where you stop, and then run some more.

    now obviously people with circulation problems have a much higher resting heart rate and can max it out with almost no effort, but you want to compare your self with healthy people, who will experiance the same need to suffer a bit, if they want the high zones
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2018
  9. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    15,451
    Likes Received:
    4,352
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    I think you’re missing my point. I’m not talking even about getting to max rate. My heartbeat doesn’t enter “cardio” range before I get entirely out of breath, when doing exercise that should put it in that range. Staying out of breath doesn’t seem to raise it higher - I have to back off a bit just to keep going, and my heart rate seems to stay steady then. Given my history of exercise-induced asthma (haven’t had an attack in years, but it probably still affects function), that’s probably not so odd, especially if we assume some error from the monitor used.
     
  10. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    537
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    but there isn't exercise that should put it in the range, that's a completely personal issue, you do what ever exercise will put ur in the range, heart rate monitors are not a necessary, heart beating like a drum is really the only indication you need.

    if your out of oxygen, through exercises or,asthma,or both you heart beat WILL increase if you continue to plough on, unless you have two hearts,

    so we have two options ether your a miracle or your stopping before the hard work starts and trying to justify it as medical
     
  11. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    15,451
    Likes Received:
    4,352
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    Individual bodies do respond differently. What you state as certainty doesn't actually happen to me the way you expect it to - unless the monitors I've used are way off (and that's the monitor issue you dismissed). I don't recall my heart ever "beating like a drum" except in fear. In exhaustion? Never.
     

Share This Page