Shito-ry

Discussion in 'Karate' started by Michael89, Feb 10, 2014.

  1. Michael89

    Michael89 Orange Belt

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    So my Grandmaster from Taekwondo class tonight mentioned that he took a Shito Ryu during his time in Tokyo. I was wondering what is different shito Ryu between Shotokan Karate?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2014
  2. Carol

    Carol Crazy like a...

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    Great question, although I don't know the answer.

    Unfortunately our profanity filter occasionally trips over the name of that particular style. style, which is why you see the asterisks. I just put in a message to the mods, we'll see if we can fix it so Shito-ryu is displayed properly
     
  3. Touch Of Death

    Touch Of Death Sr. Grandmaster

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    You could say Cheeto-Ryu, but then you may have problems with Frito-Lay. :)
     
  4. Michael89

    Michael89 Orange Belt

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    thanks
     
  5. dancingalone

    dancingalone Grandmaster

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    Shito-ryu is a blend of both the Shuri-te and Naha-te methods. The founder Mabuni Kenwa studied with both Itosu and Higaonna, two of Okinawan karate's acknowledged greats/legends. It is an elegant looking style with many kata available to practice as you might imagine from its heritage.

    In general, Shotokan 'looks' more powerful than Shito-ryu while the latter 'looks' more fluid and speedier. The kata in Shito-ryu are closer to the Shorin-ryu sources so you have the front kicks in the Pinan kata rather than sidekicks as in the Shotokan Heian equivalents. Also, Shito-ryu people usually practice some kobudo as well, while it is not as common with Shotokan people.

    Any specific questions? While I am not Shito-ryu myself, I have spent some time with friends who are seriously involved in the style (they were involved with Julius Thiry's group for many years).
     
  6. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    Shito Ryu has a lot of kata. They definitely prefer breadth over depth.

    http://www.shito-ryu.eu/shito-ryu-kata-list/

    With over 49 kata, I think this is the system with the most. I can't think of a karate system that practices more. That said, I think you can see what is emphasized. If you like to learn and practice the solo kata, this system is for you.
     
  7. Michael89

    Michael89 Orange Belt

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    although I take Taekwondo class. I learned basic forms as well Naihanchi Shodan (under Korean word) and Bo staff.
     
  8. Kong Soo Do

    Kong Soo Do IKSDA Director

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    Here is a tidbit from the IKSDA lineage page:

    Perhaps it is possible that your GM trained at this dojo in Tokyo with or under YOON, Kwe, Byung? Might be interesting to ask him. Keep in mind that Korean martial history is nebulous at best and one has to take most everything with a grain of salt.
     
  9. Michael89

    Michael89 Orange Belt

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    I look up on website. He did trained under Dr. Kye Byoung Yoon. He then studied one year in Japan and graduated in 1967. While in Japan, he trained at the Yo-Yo-Ki Karate School in Tokyo for one year. Now, I have interesting in what you have to say. : )
     
  10. Michael89

    Michael89 Orange Belt

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    I want to know more about Dr. Kye Byoung Yoon.
     
  11. twendkata71

    twendkata71 Black Belt

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    Many factions of Shito ryu karate do have 60 kata. Some kata in shito ryu have been adopted from other styles. For instance Hayashi Ha Shito ryu and other factions adopted most of the Ryuei ryu kata like, Anan,pachu,Paiku,etc.
    Mabuni O'sensei was a kata collector. attempting to learn as many kata as he could to increase his knowledge of karate.
    In comparison to Shotokan. Shito ryu uses shorter stances in a lot of it's kata. Shotokan uses deep stances and more dynamic motion. Shito ryu uses both circular and linear blocking. Shotokan focuses more on linear blocking.
    Mabuni was actually Funakoshi's senior in terms of karate do training. They were friends and went to mainland Japan around the same time to spread karate.
     
  12. Makalakumu

    Makalakumu Gonzo Karate Apocalypse

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    I can see the value of collecting kata if you know how to break down a few thoroughly. I wonder how many Shito Ryu dojos do this? With 60 kata, it has to be difficult to do much beyond practice kata.
     
  13. Michael89

    Michael89 Orange Belt

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    come to think of it. I think my grandmaster borrowed some of idea from Shito-Ryu. we worked on alot of poomses and breaking down forms as warm up training.
     
  14. Kong Soo Do

    Kong Soo Do IKSDA Director

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  15. Michael89

    Michael89 Orange Belt

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  16. twendkata71

    twendkata71 Black Belt

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    I have learned about 43 kata and it has taken me 33 years to break down half of what is in all of the kata. Lots more to learn.




     
  17. reeskm

    reeskm Green Belt

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    ***Edited to ad more info**
    I too am looking for as much info as possible about Yoon, Kwei Byung.

    I'm Moo Duk Kwan and deeply interested in reasearching this little-known but hugely influential Korean Karate master.

    I believe he is a huge figure that has never really been written about on the internet, but so far have pieced together the following:

    - As a young boy or teenager, was sent by his family for high school or junior high to Japan during the occupation times. There, he lived in Osaka. He started learning from Mabuni Kenwa and trained in Shito-Ryu style
    - After a while he was old enough for university, and then studied Agriculture at Tokyo Central University. There, he continued his Karate studies under Kanken Toyama of the legendary ShudoKan in the Meguro district of Tokyo
    - Somehow, he learned Chuan Fa in Manchuria. However, this story might be not true as he is often confused with Yoon, Byung-In as they were related and apparently close like brothers
    - Helped teach at the YMCA Kwon Bop Bu with Chang Sang Sup and Yoon Byung-In
    - Shows up in tons of early photos relating to the YMCA Kwon Bop-bu, with Chung Sang Sup and Yoon Byung-In
    - Seems to have been really close the Hwang Kee of the Moo Duk Kwan
    - He, along with Hwang Kee split from the KTA - Korean Taekwondo Association (Government forced unification movement in 1962 in Korea). They published a joint statement/letter resigning as members of the KTA stating that the goals of the TKD unification process were "contrary to the ideals and ideology of the martial arts"!
    - He has died recently, but I am unable to find any orbituary or biography information about him since 1970
    - He led many teams of Tang Soo Do (AKA Korean Karate) competitors in early WUKO events in Asia, along with Hwang Kee, H.C. Hwang, C.S. Kim and many other well known Masters in the history books and living today
    - Was present at the 1970 WUKO tournament in Tokyo when the Shotokan famously had their spat and split into factions
    - Founded the Kanbukan dojo in 1940 in Tokyo, Japan, which was known as the "Korean Martial Hall" - a place where tons of famous martial artists lik Mas Oyama and Goju-ryu students would come to compete in free sparring (Jayu-dae ryun in Kr or Jiyu-kumite in JP)
    - The Kanbukan dojo changed it's name to the Renbukan after Yoon left Japan in 1949, and then changed it to the Renbukai. This is now an officially recognized and little known style of Japanese Karate by WKF and other Japanese organizations
    - pioneered or popularized the use of bogu (kendo) armor in competition matches because he felt that if it wasn't full contact, it wasn't real enough! This was before Jhoon Rhee invented his foam padding. In fact, I think Jhoon Rhee was JidoKwan.
    - went back home to Korea in 1949 and became the 1st president of the Jido Kwan
    - Based on his experience with the founding of the Kanbukan, known for it's full contact style teaching methods, was probably responsible for the Jidokwan's legacy of also producing full-contact and tournament winning fighters in Korea
    - Seems to have gone back to Japan many times. He may have been living there during the Korean war period, and also in the 70s as well.
    - Was apparently a very influential and early founding member or official in the Mindan (the zainichi S. Korean people's (expat's) association in Japan)
    - may have contributed greatly to the Korean Karate Federation in Busan before his recent death, and remained a member of the WKF (WUKO successor)
    - Was a shihan of Kanken Toyama sensei
    - Had may aliases. Apparently, nobody could seem to transliterate his name correctly
    - Wrote books on Karate, in Japanese and Korean. One book was about using the bo/bong and he created his own bong forms
    - Seems to have been completely dissapeared off the face of the earth. Virtually the same brief story is rehashed throughout the internet, and long stories, anecdotes or bios about his life are impossible to find.
    - Other spellings of his last name in English: Yun, Yoon, Yung, Byung, Byun
    - Other spellings of his given names: Gekka, In Hei, Yoon Kwe, Yun Kwei, etc

    According to my Kwan Jang (Carl C. Tate, Jr.) he might have been living in the USA recently. KJN Tate belives he heard he was living in Maryland, but couldn't remember any other details. Can anybody else confirm this?

    I think Yoon Kwei-Byung was probably the most underrated and little known Master out of all the Korean masters with links to Japan and the early founding of Korean Martial arts post-WW2.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2014
  18. MAist25

    MAist25 Blue Belt

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    I would love to learn more about Yoon Kwei-Bung as well. Nobody ever seems to talk about him but his contributions to Taekwondo seem to be huge.
     
  19. reeskm

    reeskm Green Belt

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    Do any Shito-ryu stylists have access to lineage charts or old pictures circa 1930 who would be able to find a "Gekka Yun" in a photograph? He would only have been a young high school student at the time. The key would be that he was a zainichi Korean, so anybody with in depth knowledge of Mabuni Kenwa's students would be able to confirm his.
     
  20. chrispillertkd

    chrispillertkd Senior Master

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    Very interesting. I have never heard these two gentlemen were related (and Korea is notorious for having a paucity of surnames so it can be hard to be sure who exactly is related to whom). Do you have a source for this information about them being related?

    Jhoon Rhee was actually a member of the Chung Do Kwan before founding his own style of Taekwon-Do. He may well still be considered a member of the Chung Do Kwan, despite this, and was promoted to 10th dan in Chung Do Kwan by Lee, Won Kuk (Chung Do Kwan founder) in 1998.

    He's certainly one of them. Hong Jong Pyo is another pretty obscure one. Many of the Korean masters involved in the early days of the Kwans aren't well known in the west, sadly.

    Pax,

    Chris
     

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