Pak Mei Pai forms

Discussion in 'Chinese Martial Arts - General' started by tigercrane, Aug 25, 2015.

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  1. tigercrane

    tigercrane Yellow Belt

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    Pak Mai remains one of the very rare Southern styles that you don't hear much about, let alone see forms being shown. I could hand-count the videos that I've seen on YT and elsewhere, which show a form or an application here and there and not much else. I own two books that delve into details of training but cannot find any material that would contain all forms.

    From my understanding this style is still largely underground in HK and there are less than few qualified instructors in the US.

    Does anyone know if all complete forms exist in any type of published material anywhere? Thanks!
     
  2. clfsean

    clfsean Senior Master

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    Nope. Some of the more common forms (Jik Bo, Gau Bu Toi, Sup Ji, Sek Si, Ying Jow Nim) are pretty much everywhere, but not too much in print for forms that I've come across. Besides, without a good grip on Tun/To/Fou/Chum & the whole Hakka theory on things, it would make about not much sense at all.
     
  3. tigercrane

    tigercrane Yellow Belt

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    Thanks for replying. After working with some texts, I came to realization that Hakka folks have several styles that share similar principles. For instance, Southern Mantis (Jook Lum), Kei Lun Kuen and Wing Chun have similar bridges, dropped shoulders, sunken elbows, punches originating from the chest, concave chest, etc.

    What really sets Pak Mei apart in its uniqueness is the explosive (sudden scare type) power, which is almost like a jump after being zapped by a thousand volts. Another interesting aspects are the use of phoenix eye fist, finger strikes, footwork that is semi-circular with toes gripping the ground, etc. It is complex an neither hard nor soft.
     
  4. Mikeitup

    Mikeitup White Belt

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    There are different versions out there. Cheung Lai Chun, Fatsan and even Omei Pak Mei. Each have similar forms and follow pretty much the same Hakka methods (float, sink, swallow spit) with some slight differences (as in any system). Willy Pang has a couple of books out on the subject of CLC Pak Mei and Tyler Rea has some books out too.
     
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  5. Mikeitup

    Mikeitup White Belt

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  6. tigercrane

    tigercrane Yellow Belt

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    Thank you for replying! Yes, I own these two books. Tyler Rea's one describes the basic methods but falls short on providing forms. Likewise, Willy Pang's book explores the training methods but provides no forms either.

    And yes, the videos below are great but again, they are not informative as far as the forms are concerned. I probably will have to accept that some arts are just that unaccessible.
     
  7. guy b.

    guy b. Master Black Belt

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    Wing chun does not have the same power generation as Bak Mei, Lung Ying, Tong Long and others. It is a very different system.

    I would also say that SPM, BM etc are all virtually the same thing. All must have originated from same Hakka generic methods
     
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  8. Mikeitup

    Mikeitup White Belt

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    Well they all were developed in the same geographic area in southern china and they are similar yet have their obvious differences etc. Its said that they all developed from Lo Man Gar the old beggars arts and used to be called collectively Hakka kuen. SPM has 4 branches, Chu Gar, Jook Lum, Dit Ngau and Chow Gar.
     
  9. Knapf

    Knapf Green Belt

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    Is there anyone else currently doing Bak Mei? I would like to discuss more about Bak Mei
     
  10. DaleDugas

    DaleDugas My door is always open.

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    You will not be able to learn a form from a book, hence most systems do not publish them. Hakka systems are also more closed door compared to other arts that have been watered down over the years.

    There are great Bak Mei/Bai Mei teachers here in the US, as well as Canada, UK and other nations.

    There are many groups on Facebook as well.
     
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  11. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

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    All of the Bak Mei forms that form the core set taught by Cheung Lai Cheng are widely available on YouTube. I remember having checked every single one of them.

    Knapf, you train a lineage from Malaysia. Do you train any unique routines outside the CLC set?
     
  12. Knapf

    Knapf Green Belt

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    Regarding your question in the other thread,I know there is a relation to CLC because my Sifu has mentioned a few times but don't know what exactly. Perhaps once I get employed and have a job I can rejoin the Bak Mei classes and ask my Sifu again haha. My first form is called tung jit kuen. I tried searching about it on the net using what I presume are the chinese characters but I all can get are jit kuen do(bruce lee's jeetkundo)
     
  13. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

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    I can maybe help you. ;)



    Is it the correct one?
     
  14. Knapf

    Knapf Green Belt

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    Haha. Correct. Correct. That is exactly the 1st form. Where is this located?
     
  15. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

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    Knew it! I'm good. :D

    I believe that was shot in HK, and as far as I'm aware of, it's not one of the original forms, which of course does not degrade it by any means. It's simply just created later and looks like a good beginner form to me.

    It's from the Yau Kung Moon school, as written on their shirts.

    Edit: And by the fact that your teacher has this form, I can say with some certainty that the connection to CLC comes from Ha Hon Hung, one of his early students.
     
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  16. Knapf

    Knapf Green Belt

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    So what made you join BM? I like it because of it's unique ways to generate power. Although I have to get used to evading opponent's punches unlike accepting them head on like my pre-BM era.
     
  17. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

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    My teacher asked me. Yes, he actually did. :D

    I was at that time learning some old-style karate from him, which he had studied before. Then, when I was moving closer to his location he asked whether I was interested in joining his BM group. I did, haven't regretted although the first months were frustrating trying to activate the correct muscles to generate power.

    BM has a really effective way to engage the spine in your striking technique. The short power is the famous application, but it makes hilarious defense as well. Gotta love the sook sau :D On the flipside of it though, I have had to come terms with the fact that I suck at applying the technique and the power in a living sparring context. :confused:
     
  18. Knapf

    Knapf Green Belt

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    So your teacher's lineage is also related to CLC?
     
  19. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    I don't do Bak Mei but there is some if it in the system that I train in. A lot of what was done in that video from Pose #13 is found in Jow Ga.
     
  20. Knapf

    Knapf Green Belt

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    Double post
     

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