Maxims.

Discussion in 'Wing Chun' started by Highlander, May 10, 2019.

  1. Highlander

    Highlander Yellow Belt

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    The hips and shoulders aren't so much springs as they are pivot points for the springs to bend and turn when necessary IMO.
    Anatomy supports this (also supports the other discussion about hands=feet elbow=knee hip=shoulder)
    The wrist and ankle joints are gliding joints. Great for making single direction movement and small circles.
    The knees and elbows are hinge joints; great for.. well.. hinging lol. Larger amount of movement but stuck to one plane.
    The shoulder and hips are the most free moving joints in the body, a ball and socket joint. This gives you movement at every angle but requires a lot of muscle to stabilize.
    So now if we start thinking about the types of joints our body has and apply the theory of the arms and legs being springs attached to the spine you can very clearly see how the arms and legs can compress (much like a spring) through the hinging joint. Once the joint moves in too close to the body it becomes weak and requires muscles to hold the structure (instead of bone). To get around this, let your ball and socket joint relax and pass the tension to the larger spring of your spine. Think about how a very strong heavy spring bends under pressure that isnt applied directly to the center. Then you snap back to center and hopefully hit your target. This is all assuming contact has already been made and you cant simply just punch the guy......
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2019
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  2. Highlander

    Highlander Yellow Belt

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    ^^TLDR. Let your joints bend and flow naturally to deal with incoming force
     
  3. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    I feel we are in the same vein of thinking. When we talk about making power from the torso we use the description of the torso as a very high tension vertical spring. The spring is loaded by rotation of the waist with the ends affixed at the shoulders and waist. Like a high tension spring it doesn't take a great deal of rotation on its axis to fully load the spring creating very great potential energy. Once the motion of the technique is set in motion the energy is converted to kinetic and creates a massive power boost for the strike/block/kick, etc...
    I never go into this level of detail with a new student; they would just glaze over.
     
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  4. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    The "twist and spring" throw require 3 forces going into 3 different directions at the same time.

    1. Pull your opponent's right arm toward south direction.
    2. Push his head toward west direction.
    3. Spring his left leg toward east direction.
     
  5. Highlander

    Highlander Yellow Belt

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    Not really sure what you're going for with this comment... is this how you define the three springs of the body?
    Or are you simply breaking down a particular throw?
     

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