Martial Arts on CV Hobbies

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by Grasshopper22, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. Grasshopper22

    Grasshopper22 Orange Belt

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    Hey, I'm going to write my CV this weekend and under 'Hobbies and Interests' I'm going to put 'Ju-Jitsu' because that's the martial art that I do but how could I expand on that? It shows that I like to keep myself in good health. I like to socialise and meet new people? Any ideas are welcome, thank you! :) Or should I not put it because they'll think I'm a violent person? Help!
     
  2. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    Hobbies do not belong on resumes; ever. Nothing, nada, do not do it.

    If I get a resume (as we call them here) with hobbies listed, it goes directly into the trash. Same if it mentions the applicant's religion, skin color, or includes a photo. These things do not belong on a resume (CV). Work experience and education, professional certifications, publications, and other things directly relevant to the job, nothing more.

    Your call, but I'd avoid it like the plague.
     
  3. lklawson

    lklawson Senior Master

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    I conclude that your work & life experience is still a bit "thin" and you're looking for ways to "flesh it out" a bit. That's OK, being young isn't bad. You need to get a "Guide to Writing Resume's" or the like. There's a thousand of them for free on the 'net. Google a few up and take their advice.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  4. jks9199

    jks9199 Cause of War & Destroyer of Civilization Staff Member

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    Listing hobbies on a resume should be limited to relevant hobbies to the job. It is very rare but maybe for example photography if you're trying for a first job is tography studio. Once you have an actual work experience that should be there not hobby experience.
    Sent from my Ally using Tapatalk
     
  5. puunui

    puunui Senior Master

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    I wouldn't put martial arts or hobbies on your resume.
     
  6. Carol

    Carol Crazy like a...

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    You're getting advice from an American point of view, where don't often put hobbies on our resume. The European CV is a bit more detailed than our resumes tend to be. Here is an article from a UK paper about hobbies on a CV.

    http://careers.guardian.co.uk/cv-interests-hobbies

    For martial arts, its a gamble. Many don't want their colleagues or employers to know they train. Some may not care but don't wish to advertise it. I actually did take a chance, and my martial arts training help me get my last two jobs -- one that I had for 5 years, and the one where I currently work now. It is not magic -- I was a strong candidate to begin with. But in each case I could draw a relevant parallel between my martial arts experience and what I'd be doing as an engineer.
     
  7. puunui

    puunui Senior Master

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    Good point, never occurred to me that there may be a difference. And I just spoke to a friend living in London this morning.
     
  8. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie 2nd Black Belt

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    I always had it on my CV when I was in England. Worked well for me, never had a problem getting work. I didn't put it on there until I got my 1st Dan, Criminal Records Bureau clearance and Instructor's course done. Then I made it clear that I was a practising instructor. This was partly on the grounds that the first question people ask when they find out you 'do' martial arts is.....'are you a black belt?'. I saw the way people reacted face to face when the answer to that question was 'No'. People lost interest. So, maybe put it on is my answer, but be clear about why it's there, and what kind of transferable work skills that represents.

    Incidentally, photographs are pretty much de rigeur with a CV in Germany.
     
  9. jks9199

    jks9199 Cause of War & Destroyer of Civilization Staff Member

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    I've also heard this; if you're going to list MA on a resume or CV -- don't do it unless you're a black belt. The black belt infers a degree of commitment to a course of study or action.
     
  10. puunui

    puunui Senior Master

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    What if you study a style that doesn't award dan ranking?
     
  11. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie 2nd Black Belt

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    The words 'fully qualified / certified practising martial arts instructor' carry the same meaning to a non-martial artist employer, I'd say. I would try to infer transferable skills such as lesson planning, classroom management, time management, leadership, public speaking and so on. The list is endless. Martial arts are awesome, after all ;)
     
  12. jks9199

    jks9199 Cause of War & Destroyer of Civilization Staff Member

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    Refrain from including it unless you're at an equivalent level, I guess.

    Here in the US, I wouldn't generally include it unless there was some particular relevance. Like applying for a position teaching martial arts, or maybe some other sort of teaching position. And I'd be ready to support that relevance. Gnarlie has a few examples of where there might be relevance. If you sit on an organizational board or the like, that might also be worth including -- but I could also see it as a negative. I could see a potential employer reading "Board of Directors, National Martial Arts Organization", and wondering whether your hobbies take too much of your time and attention.
     
  13. Daniel Sullivan

    Daniel Sullivan Grandmaster

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    I only list it because I actually teach and am compensated for my services. I list it as part time work, however, not as a hobby. I don't put hobbies on my resume, but if the application asks about hobbies (some do), that would be the place to list it. As Carol pointed out, this is from a US perspective.
     
  14. lklawson

    lklawson Senior Master

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    I avoid listing prior jobs, experience (or hobbies) which are not directly related to the job I am applying for or, for a generic resume, the general market.

    For instance, I didn't list my experience as a Security Guard when applying for IT positions.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  15. jks9199

    jks9199 Cause of War & Destroyer of Civilization Staff Member

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    And, in most resumes, part time work doesn't get listed unless it's relevant to the position or necessary to explain a gap in employment. In the US, your resume is a "sell me" page, showing how you're qualified for a job. In fact, today, the advice is generally to tailor each resume to the job in question.
     
  16. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie 2nd Black Belt

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    And the covering letter is equally important, at least in the UK. A covering letter that only says 'please find enclosed my CV in application for the role of Head Wok-Smuggler' is likely to land the accompanying CV in file Z-Alpha (that's the round one on the floor). The covering letter should address all points in the advertisement without repeating what's on the CV. Oh, and avoid the phrase 'as you can see from my CV...'.

    Plus, a lot of UK employers seem to work to the mantra 'Avoid employing unlucky people - throw half the applications away without looking at them', so tailor it, work hard on it, but don't take it personally when nothing comes of it.

    I only include MA as a hobby where I can at least tenuously justify that it has some relevance to the job I'm applying for.
     
  17. jks9199

    jks9199 Cause of War & Destroyer of Civilization Staff Member

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    Absolutely; the cover letter is very important. The days of the shotgun, send out a raft of resumes and generic cover letters are pretty much gone. Today, the cover letter should really stress the key points about how YOU are the person they want to look at and hire. The resume should then support and "prove" that.
     
  18. ralphmcpherson

    ralphmcpherson Senior Master

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    As an employer myself, I have no problems with someone listing hobbies on their resume. In fact the more I can know about a potential employee the better. I look highly on martial arts in particular because in a world where no one can stick to anything for longer than 5 minutes, I see it as a positive that someone can have a hobby/interest and actually stick with it. One of the last guys I employed mentioned on his resume that he was a 3rd dan in tkd and had trained continuously for 11 years, I personally saw this as a good thing and worth mentioning.
     
  19. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie 2nd Black Belt

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    I just want to make the same point, but emphasise a different word. The cover letter should really stress the key points about HOW you are the person they want to look at and hire.

    We used to get loads of applications with covering letters claiming things like 'I am a self starter', or 'I deal with pressure well'. Of course all the applicants will make those claims, even the people that can't back it up. Not providing evidence just leaves the employer asking the question 'how?'

    For every claim one makes in the covering letter, one should justify it with real-world examples, e.g. 'my experience as head Wok-Smuggling controller at Acme Wok Co, dealing with multiple conflicting priorities under tight deadlines, shows that I respond well in a high pressure environment.'

    I'd say the same goes for adding MA to the CV - if you can justify it, and it belongs to the group of skills and experience that illustrate HOW you are a good fit for the job, then go right ahead.
     
  20. Jenna

    Jenna Senior Master

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    Wok-smuggling controller, huh? I have factory in Szechuan Province. Have opening for Wok-smuggling controller. Good rate.. pay you fiddy dorra US.. Interested? You know Kung Fu? Do not forget to include Martial Art hobby on resume!
     

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