KT:How do you teach th basics to begginers?

Discussion in 'KenpoTalk' started by Clark Kent, Oct 1, 2014.

  1. Clark Kent

    Clark Kent <B>News Bot</B>

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    How do you teach th basics to begginers?
    By nelson - 10-01-2014 07:45 PM
    Originally Posted at: KenpoTalk

    ====================

    Coming from a EP "Hyprid" system we leaned the "classical" blocks that were done from a full horse stance that including keeping hands at the waist. Starting in the 1970's we were taught to execute our stances, blocks, and strikes from what we called a 3/4 fighting stance. Each block was then followed up on with a strike or block to make the students' movements more compatible with what we saw on thhe street. Most of us were bouncers and bodyguards so we did not spend a lot of time on forms and kata's.

    How do you teach your beggining students? When are more combative mathods taught inyour curriculum?

    I apologise for any misspellings in my post. I've switched to a tablet and have not mastered all of it's features!


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  2. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    On my first day I was taught the basics in the front stance. It is the most heavily used stance in my primary style and the very first thing you learn on your first day usually is the front stance. From there you're taught the reverse punch, front kick, high block, low block, and side kick. The roundhouse kick is usually learned within the next few classes.
     
  3. kravmaga1

    kravmaga1 Yellow Belt

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    You can teach the basics to beginners by discussing all the theory of it. Once they get to know the theory perfectly it will be easy for them to catch up practically.
     
    • Disagree Disagree x 4
  4. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    No that's a terrible idea,..people want to be doing martial arts not talking about it. You spend to much time talking they're not coming back. Get them moving straight away and discuss later on when they're more invested in it
     
  5. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    - Only teach them 1 technique.
    - Force them to use that technique (and nothing else) in the ring, or on the mat for the next 6 months.
    - After 6 months, ask them to use that technique to set up next technique. The students then start to learn the 2nd technique.

    For example, start from

    - jab, and go into jab, cross combo.
    - front kick, and go into front kick, roundhouse kick combo.
    - shoulder lock, and go into shoulder lock, elbow lock combo.
    - single leg, and go into single leg, inner hook combo.
    - ...
     
  6. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    When I was 11, my brother in law taught me an open hand form and a staff form. One day I got into a fight. But I didn't know how to use information from that form. I complained to my brother in law. He stopped me from doing any more form. He forced me to train "1 step 3 punches" for the next 3 years. That was the best investment I have done for my MA training.

    IMO, by using 3 years to train 1 technique may be too boring. But 6 month, 1 year, or even 2 years are quite reasonable. It requires at least 6 months to develop a good technique any way.
     
  7. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    You're teaching theory without any physical methodology for them to attach it to. You have it backwards. They need fundamental movements, then the theory behind the mechanics of those movements. Then more difficult movement and the theory behind those. Then tactics and the theory behind them. And so forth. After a point, you can introduce theory as a topic to lead to physical work, but that requires (for most people) a foundation for them to understand from.
     
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  8. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    It depends on what MA style that you are teaching. I taught a Taiji class in Austin Community College before. During the 1st class, I taught them the basic stances that would be used in the Taiji system. A student stood up and said, "This is not Taiji." He then left. I assume if I just talked about Ying Yang, soft, yield, follow, sink, ... theory, that guy might stay.

    For someone MA is as simple as "fist meets face". For others, MA can mean self-cultivation, mind over body, inner peace, ...
     
  9. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    He might stay, but would he actually be learning the MA? I agree that some folks don't like the boring nature of some of the basics.
     

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