Korean terms for throws

Discussion in 'Korean Martial Arts - General' started by thanson02, Feb 10, 2017.

  1. thanson02

    thanson02 Green Belt

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    Hey everyone. I was wondering if I could get some assistance.

    I am working with one of my students on collecting Korean terms for various elements of our art (kicks, punches, stances, etc) for one of his college school projects and one area that we have been running into issues with are throws and take-downs. The problem we are running into is that many of the throws we have are worked into techniques, so when we ask the higher-ups for the Korean name for say, a shoulder throw, we are directed to a technique number. The student in question has tried talking to the Korean Club on campus, but none of them are martial artist and he said they really were not that helpful.

    I found this website, which helps because it gives the Korean names and the Hangul for some throws, but I wanted to know if people were able and willing to help clarify on some of the terms or possibly direct me to a good Yudo website that can help us out:

    Korean Names of the 12 Most Popular Judo Techniques - Red Dragon Diaries

    I have tried to pick apart the terms on the website to get a better understanding of how the terms are used, but any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    This looks like something @KangTsai could help with
     
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  3. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    ...And I'm here. Premier resident Korean.
     
  4. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    Actually, the list is pretty accurate and I don't see any additional details I could make. Ask me for any specific questions I guess.
     
  5. thanson02

    thanson02 Green Belt

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    Well first off, thank you for verifying the names and their accuracy. That makes things easier. :)

    Looking at the list, we have been able to piece together parts like "heori" is waist and "dari" is leg. I guess we are looking at the tems for the throws themselves. The three primary terms they mention are:

    치기: chi-gi
    후리기: hu-ri-gi
    채기: chae-gi
    걸기: geol-gi

    From what I am getting, "hurigi" is the basic term for a leg sweep while "chigi" is for the full throw? I know that Chigi is used with kicking "Ap Chigi for front kick" and I am wondering what the difference is here. Also, the author on the website translated hurigi as "to cut down" vs. geoigi as "to trip". I guess I am wondering what the difference is here in application.
     
  6. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    First off, "to kick" is 차기.
    걸기 means to hook, so it should be used when describing trips. 후리기 means to swing; whip; cut down. Those would be for the sweeping throws with the bigger ranges of motion.
     
  7. thanson02

    thanson02 Green Belt

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    So is that why the sweeping hip throw is 허리후리기 = heo-ri-hu-ri-gi? Your using a swinging whipping motion around the waist to throw them?

    Sent from my XT1096 using Tapatalk
     
  8. thanson02

    thanson02 Green Belt

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    Well if the list is fairly complete, then we should be able to use it. The only ones that we have questions on are kicks that throw someone over you with your foot. We use primarily three of them:
    • You plant your foot in their waist and as you drop, you throw them over the top
    • You plant your foot in their waist, but as you drop, you turn so you can throw them sideways
    • Instead of planting your foot, you put your foot on the inside of their leg between the groin and the knee and throw them over the top that way.
    And thank you @KangTsai for the clarifications on the language use. Context is always helpful in understanding what is going on.
     
  9. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    On a related note, do you by any chance have links to videos of those three throws. Two of them sound like one of our throws (yes, two of them sound like one), so I want to see if I'm imagining them right.
     
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  10. thanson02

    thanson02 Green Belt

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    I don't have any videos of any of our guys doing these, but here are some videos on YouTube of people doing what I am talking about.

    This is the first one:


    This one is close to the second one I mentioned, but we use the other foot and as we throw them over, we roll up on them. But they go strait over and we turn sideways to get them over:


    And this is an old video, but it is the same throw as the third one I mentioned. This one we do as a counter-throw:


    Hope that clarifies.
     
  11. thanson02

    thanson02 Green Belt

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    Actually this one shows the setup for the second throw better, but the person in the video throws him to the outside, almost above his head (which we do) but we also throw him to the inside, across the body. So for the second one we throw them both ways.

     
  12. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    That's pretty similar to our "Groin Block" throw, though we always throw across the body. So, if the right leg comes up, we "fall" to the right, and uke ends up to our left.
     
  13. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    Yep
     
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  14. thanson02

    thanson02 Green Belt

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    Yup. I think we are talking about the same thing.

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  15. thanson02

    thanson02 Green Belt

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    So I guess my next question is what is the difference between these:

    치기: chi-gi
    채기: chae-gi

    Taking the idea that the words are expression of the action, the website said that chi-gi (치기) is used as a general term for throwing, but chae-gi (채기) is a throw that acts like someone snatching a purse. Is this used then for throws where you take both hands and pull them across the body to your side then while you are throwing them either over your shoulder or across your hip?

    I am just double checking to make sure I have this so there is no confusion when I give the information to our student.
     

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