Karate journey road block

Discussion in 'Karate' started by chrissyp, Nov 22, 2018.

  1. chrissyp

    chrissyp Green Belt

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    So i ran into a snag with my training. My shotokan school closed, and there are no local except one, but its too expensive for me.

    So im considering switching to shori ryu, because its local and affordable, but i know little about it.

    Is shori much different from shotokan? Because i want to continue something close to what i was learning.

    Ps, there is kyokushin or goju any other styles around me sadly
     
  2. chrissyp

    chrissyp Green Belt

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    Second question, which style would mesh better with western boxing?
     
  3. mrt2

    mrt2 Blue Belt

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    You will need to check out the schools in your area, as there might be differences between schools, even from the same style. Also, you might not have to limit yourself to Karate. for example, Tang Soo Do practice the same forms as Shotokan, though they do them a bit differently.
     
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  4. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    I assume that's Shorin-ryu, which if I recall correctly, is an Okinawan style. I don't know much more about it, other than the school near me seems to emphasize the Okinawan-ness of it, whatever that means to them.

    But the point another poster made is the key - you'll need to look into the actual school. I forget how long you've been training Shotokan, but go watch students at the Shorin-ryu school slightly above your current level. If it looks familiar, then what you already know will maybe make your start there easier. More importantly, see of the school looks interesting (to you). If it does, it'll probably be fun to train there, no matter how different or similar it is.
     
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  5. chrissyp

    chrissyp Green Belt

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    Thank you! Good.ideas
     
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  6. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    Well, different methods have their own way that they go about training and developing their techniques. Some systems that may be related, may have similar methodologies.

    My opinion: Karate systems have their methods for developing a punch. Boxing has it’s methods for developing a punch. I think their methods are different. They may not mesh well. If you want to do karate, then embrace karate’s way of developing a punch. If you want to do boxing, then embrace boxing’s methods. Maybe they shouldn’t be mixed.

    What I think you may be aiming at is substituting boxing’s punching techniques in place of the karate punching methods, while keeping the kicking methods of karate. This may or may not be a reasonable mix; I’m not a good judge of that as I have not studied karate nor boxing. But there is more to each method. There is footwork and stance work, strategies, karate often has joint locks and joint manipulations, sweeps, takedowns and throws, etc. What do you do about the rest of the material?

    But my point is, some things may not mix well without destroying some portion of one or the other and that may undermine the rest of the training. Whether you are satisfied with that or find it acceptable is your choice. But you need to understand that fact.
     
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  7. Papageno

    Papageno White Belt

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    I'm not familiar with Shorin-ryu, but if I were you I'd visit the dojo and talk to the sensei. He/she should be able to explain the difference. Maybe you can try one or two sessions for free (or a minor fee) just to find out if this is something for you.
     
  8. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    It’s obviously going to be a school to school thing, but overall I’m under the impression that Shorin Ryu does a good bit more in-fighting/close range stuff that Shotokan. A lot of the Shorin Ryu guys I’ve communicated with say they do a lot of kata bunkai involving standing grappling and short range striking. Shotokan is notoriously longer range punching and kicking.

    Again, it’s all a case by case basis; I’m just stereotyping a bit here. Definitely worth checking out in person. You don’t have much to lose by walking in and observing.
     
  9. Yokazuna514

    Yokazuna514 Green Belt

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    IMHO, the style is less important than the quality of instruction. You should visit the school and speak with the Sensei BUT you should also try the class out a few times to see if it suits your needs. When considering price, look to see what you are receiving for the price you are paying. If the dojo is operating out of a school or community centre, then the price charged should be noticeably different than if the place had a dedicated facility who needs to pay rent to ensure the doors stay open. Ultimately, you don't want to start training at a place that will not be open in a few years so that is something to consider in your selection process.
     
  10. Mitlov

    Mitlov Green Belt

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    Try it out. I had a background in Shotokan, but I switched to a Chun Kuk Do school (a Tang Soo Do offshoot) a couple years back. On paper, Shotokan seemed like a better "fit." I liked the underpinning theories, etc. But it turns out I really like the day-to-day practice of this CKD school. A lot of padwork, a lot of free-sparring, a lot more physical conditioning, etc. If you asked me whether I like the performance of the Shotokan-style Heian forms better than the CKD Pyong-ahn forms (basically the same things with Tang Soo Do mechanics)...probably the former. But do I like day-to-day practice better with my CKD school? Yes, by a country mile. And I never would have none that if I hadn't just given the school a try for a month.
     
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  11. Martial D

    Martial D Senior Master

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    The original American kickboxers thought so.
     
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  12. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    I do, too.
     
  13. Bruce7

    Bruce7 Orange Belt

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    I was looking for a Taekwondo school.
    For some reason the videos of Shotokan looks more like what I was taught than most of the Taekwondo Videos.
    It is a little confessing.
     

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