Judo or Taekwondo for best self defense?

Discussion in 'General Self Defense' started by BmillerWarrior, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. BmillerWarrior

    BmillerWarrior Guest

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    Which art is best for practical self defense between the two? Also what arts blend well with both of these styles? I don't want to hear it's whichever art you love that works best... I want real answers and opinions. Thanks!
     
  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    You've asked (and been answered) the blending question in two other threads - why start it again?

    As for which is best for SD, I think you'll get mixed answers on that, and it will depend a lot how you (and the school you join) train it. For me, Judo. Why? It's the first art I used in SD.
     
  3. Encho

    Encho Green Belt

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    Hi bmillerwarrior,
    Questions like this often arise in forums over the years with x and y arts, the definition of self defense is open to interpretation and different definition. The classical debate of is a striking art vs a grappling art is also beating a read horse.

    I do not see much of a conflict to practice both, I have seen taekwondo schools teach yudo the Korean for judo and taekwondo.

    In my opinion no style is supreme over other styles, each style if used in the right context by an experienced practitioner at the right time is good for self defense. In my opinion I would look more for a teacher who can teach the art that has effective theory and has a similar fit to your goals.
     
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  4. BmillerWarrior

    BmillerWarrior Guest

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    I have had serious interest in Judo well before I had interest in TKD. I think starting a journey in judo now instead of later would be better since Judo seems kind of rough on the body since I'm only 30 right now. I think it would be better for me to start my judo journey as my base and then start tkd when I'm a judo first dan and then train judo and tkd concurrently. I already have two judo gis. It makes sense. And keep up with some boxing on the side. I like how in expensive judo and boxing are compared to most other arts these days as well.
    d
     
  5. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    That's my personal inclination, mostly because I find that the older a student is when starting, the harder time they have developing good falls (which reduce the toll throws take on the body). I have students who are around my age (2 years into their training) who cannot take 1/4 of the falls/impact I can take, and I don't think my falls are all that great. I just had the luxury of developing them earlier, and commit better to them.

    There is a reasonable argument to be made that TKD is easier to start early, though from my very limited understanding of the issues there, I'd think you could offset much of that by stretching and learning a few basic kicks now, to prepare for that TKD later.
     
  6. MA_Student

    MA_Student Black Belt

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    Well sorry then you dont want to hear the truth stop asking pointless questions and just go train and work it out for yourself
     
  7. BmillerWarrior

    BmillerWarrior Guest

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    If my questions annoy you then stop replying to them.
     
  8. BmillerWarrior

    BmillerWarrior Guest

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    I'm going to stick with Judo while I'm still somewhat young.
    going
     
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  9. MA_Student

    MA_Student Black Belt

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    Lol I couldn't care less either way. It's not my problem what you do but asking these questions is frankly pointless if I say judo and another says taekwondo what're you going to do then? Ask another question? Fact is opinions from strangers mean nothing you want to see what's best go to a class and find out for yourself it's literally the only way. Either do it or don't do it simple as that really
     
  10. skribs

    skribs 2nd Black Belt

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    The school with more focus on self defense and/or a better instructor.

    Although I feel sport Judo will translate better to self defense than sport Taekwondo, if you have a good instructor in either you should be able to get good self defense from either.
     
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  11. lklawson

    lklawson Senior Master

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    Both have a reputation for blowing out knees, just for different reasons.
     
  12. Paul_D

    Paul_D Master Black Belt

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    Well unfortunately that is a real answer and opinion.

    The art you most enjoy is the one you are most likely to stick at, and therefore get good at.
     
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  13. KenpoMaster805

    KenpoMaster805 Blue Belt

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    I choose judo its very effective
     
  14. Balrog

    Balrog Master of Arts

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    The answer is simple. It's the one that you have trained the most in.
     
  15. Azulx

    Azulx Brown Belt

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    Concealed carry
     
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  16. Juany118

    Juany118 Senior Master

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    Tbh I think it you are talking self defense the best arts are ones that train the use of weapons (or weapons of opportunity) and those that have a fair amount of grappling.

    The weapons of opportunity one is largely self explanatory. Force multipliers, when used legally of course, go a long way to balancing the scales against a person dedicated to committing a crime against your person.

    The grappling one is a little more complicated but it comes down to this. A largely striking art relies either on A LOT of training, where one might be able to reliably hit vital locations on the torso (liver shots as an example) the knees properly (to hyper extend) or "head hunting" (to successfully strike with enough force to incapacitate or other wise end the threat.). The human body is VERY resilient when it comes to the type of damage an empty hand can do.

    On the other hand grappling, imo, while it does still take skill and training is more forgiving in terms of the techniques being effective. Takedowns and locks, again just my opinion, are subjectively easier in terms of getting the desired result. Have I "rung" someone's bell before? Sure but I have had far more consistent success with either a baton or getting pain compliance due to properly applied locks and holds.
     
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  17. Juany118

    Juany118 Senior Master

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    The only issue I have with this is that it is VERY limited, even in the US, from a legal point of view. If someone is not armed you can be in a world of trouble if you go for a gun as your first line of defense.
     
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  18. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I wasn't aware there was a martial art that trained in use of weapons of opportunity. What arts do that to the exclusion of other techniques? Sounds interestingly Bourne.

    I can only go on my personal experience. But as I was trained in TKD, those with sufficient skill, including speed and power, became quite formidable. I understand that is not learned in a day. But the OP did not ask for what art could be learned in a week or two. I think you are not being fair with striking arts which teach in that old way. Modern arts may not always do that from what I have seen. But even those might still have some effectiveness.

    As to grappling arts, again, I can only go with the art I learned, which was the Hapkido I studied. To be effective, one does have to be quick and accurate. Mediocrity will get you in trouble. You are constantly in training and learning new techniques. Many times a new technique will require applications from an older technique. If that older technique was not properly learned, the new one won't be either. And while some techniques may allow one to power through, if you rely on power alone, you are subject to a resisting opponent being able to escape.
     
  19. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    As to the OP's question of whether Judo or TKD is better, really can't say, since I never studied Judo. Having studied Hapkido, I have a bias towards that grappling art. But I can't compare that to arts I have not studied.
     
  20. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I agree but with the exception that I don't really consider "concealed carry" a martial art. But should you be adamant that it is, then I would suggest it must be subject to the same rigorous long term training as other martial arts, along with verifiably agreed upon competition. I don't think either of those really occur at this point within the general population.
     

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