I developed a new style of martial arts!

Discussion in 'JKD / Jeet Kune Do' started by Dmitriy, Apr 21, 2017.

  1. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    Whoa sir I apologize... I took that to be a tortoise
     
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  2. Jenna

    Jenna Senior Master

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    Yummm.. Porsche 550.. too lovely for words
     
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  3. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    Yeah probably since all your stuff is just taken from other styles
     
  4. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    Just about all of our (American Karate) stuff is taken from other styles. We are such thieves!
     
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  5. Mou Meng Gung Fu

    Mou Meng Gung Fu Purple Belt

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    I took the 'jeet tek' from another style, which in turn took it from another style, so on and so forth. And if you reeeaaally want to get technical, I didn't 'take' anything. That would imply theft or stealing. I learned my stuff from qualified instructors, just like everyone else. I didn't take anything. It was given to me as a gift to help fill my arsenal. ;)

    And actually, it wasn't even a gift. I had to pay for it (lol). The fact that I still use it is sort of like an unspoken way of showing respect for a very good teacher.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2017
  6. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    Not saying there's anything wrong with that but he asked if any other style did that move so of course they do...the style he learned it from uses it
     
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  7. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    I am a turtle you damn racist.
     
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  8. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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  9. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    No way...I know turtles...I have turtles who are friends, they spend most all their time in or near the water. Not on the mats in a gym...you may turtle up as a ruse to confuse others...but you sir are a gym tortoise if I've ever seen one.
     
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  10. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    I'm not sure what that technique is. The name certainly isn't one we use, but most of the names I know are Anglicized translations of Japanese terms.
     
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  11. marques

    marques Master Black Belt

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    The side kick to the knee (as I found on YouTube)?
    No, not that kind of stopping kick. Actually, almost any kind of side kick. I am more the kind of 'frontal stopping kick'.
     
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  12. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    At least I could be considered a wurtle.
     
  13. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    double post.
     
  14. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    LOL...Wurtle, the Long Necked Turtle. ??
     
  15. Mou Meng Gung Fu

    Mou Meng Gung Fu Purple Belt

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    Just to clarify (simply because I'm not sure if we're on the same technique or not), the Cantonese term "jeet tek" (stop kick or intercepting kick) is found in many Gung Fu systems- I think. I borrowed this kick from Jeet Kune Do, being one of the main kicking techniques in that school. Although there are many ways to deliver an "intercepting kick" (or stop kick), JKD-stylists tend to favor their frontleg for delivering low kicks to obstruct the opponent's movement in mid-step or mid-kick before they can even complete their actions. High kicks can be used to intercept the opponent's intentions, but they usually take longer to deliver unless you practice it for a while (I actually performed a high stop-kick tonight when sparring). Generally, JKD-stylists will use a low side-kick or low shuffling side-kick, an inside crescent kick (inverted hook-kick) or low hook-kick (this is usually called a low roundhouse kick in other MMA-styles), a low rearleg push-kick or frontleg push-kick to the opponent's shin or inner leg as soon as they go to step or kick. Their advance opens the door for a quick and disruptive stop-kick. Keeping it low to the opponent's shins and inner legs (or groin), this makes it faster and less telegraphic. It also enables you to close the gap very quickly, as the stop-kick becomes a bridge to the punching and trapping range almost instantaneously.
     

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