Hurt my wrist - Blog post

Discussion in 'Chinese Martial Arts - General' started by Xue Sheng, Nov 1, 2017.

  1. Xue Sheng

    Xue Sheng Sr. Grandmaster

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    Hurt my wrist - blog post

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  2. Marnetmar

    Marnetmar Black Belt

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    Sounds like wrist tendonitis which takes a long time to heal. I would advise taking some time off and doing forward-and-back wrist curls with low weight (5-10 lb) dumbbells and high reps a few times daily to gain strength back in that wrist before you start punching or (especially) doing palm strikes again.

    I'd also recommend keeping at it once you're back to punching again and slowly increasing the weight.

    One other thing: when you're doing palm strikes, is your wrist all the way flexed before you make contact?
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
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  3. Xue Sheng

    Xue Sheng Sr. Grandmaster

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    Thanks

    Only hurt my wrist using the boxing gloves, had not hurt my wrist ever before in the over 40 years I have been hitting stuff; heavy bag, wall, strike pads, trees, etc.. Also had never used boxing gloves in the over 40 years I had been hitting stuff either.

    It was one hit and a sharp pain.... no pain doing anything else, unless I but pressure on it with my wrist flexed.

    Also getting acupuncture.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
  4. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    Personally, I suspect the extra padding in boxing gloves can cause things to go wonky when you hit a heavy bag. Maybe it’s harder to know if you have your wrist lined up properly. Perhaps that is another reason boxers tape their wrists, for extra support and protection from such an injury that using the gloves can contribute to.

    Don’t use boxing glove without also taping wrists.
     
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  5. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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  6. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    Funny tagline on the text. (not your injury) "How to tell the difference between a Wrist Sprain and a Wrist Fracture." I'm pretty sure there is a huge difference and not one that can easily be confused. Fractures feel like breaks and the first thing that comes to mind is "I think I broke my wrist." lol. Wiki How can be strange WebMD would probably be the better reference guide.
     
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  7. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    Boxing gloves doesn't allow you to make the correct fist and alignment that you normally make when you don't have gloves on. The other problem is that you have a larger area of impact which means that hitting off center on the glove can cause stress on your wrist that you don't get without gloves. As a martial artist, I hate boxing gloves. When I wear boxing gloves I don't tape my wrist which is just a lot of Stupid on my part especially since I know the risks of using those gloves without tape.

    From what you stated it sounds as if you didn't get "dead center" of the glove and the alignment of your wrist. If you had a fractured wrist then it wouldn't matter if your wrist was flexed or not or if pressure was on it. It would hurt even if you didn't do anything, especially after flexing and putting pressure on a fracture. It may be possible that you tore something in your wrist.
     
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  8. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    Sorry you are hurting. I recommend isshinryu fist formation. Thumb on top locks wrist in place.
     
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  9. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    I don't know. I had a fractured leg bone that was actually misdiagnosed as a high ankle sprain. I assume something similar is possible for the arm.
     
  10. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    That's an interesting point, Bill. I don't notice a difference in my wrist when I put the thumb there. What am I missing?
     
  11. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    Did it feel like a sprain?
     
  12. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    Make your normal fist, then make the fist that Bill is talking about. You should be able to see how the bones in your hand align. You may need to turn your hand so you can get a lateral view of your hand.
     
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  13. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Yeah. It is called an x ray.
     
  14. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    It hurt like hell, that's all I knew. I'd never had a high ankle sprain before, so didn't know what to expect it to feel like. The area of pain is similar - there's a muscle attachment point very near where the fracture was.
     
  15. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    I don't get much of a change. It might be because my hand is trained to the other way.
     
  16. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    Even with an X-ray, DB. It took a specialist to correct the diagnosis the original doctor gave from the X-ray of my ankle.
     
  17. Xue Sheng

    Xue Sheng Sr. Grandmaster

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    The second time I broke my ankle I discovered it was the second time. I was not aware I had broken it before. But I did know when it happened. Remembered a whole lot of pain.
     
  18. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Wow. Mine just had a big obvious crack in the bone.
     
  19. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    Apparently, mine was less obvious. When I went to the orthoped, he grabbed my leg right where it was injured. I yelped, and he said, "Yep, you broke your leg." Apparently, that's much more definitive than an X-ray. o_O
     
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  20. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    Making a traditional fist, clench tightly, and then try to move the hand to the left and the right using the other hand to grip the hand making the fist. It's hard, but it can be done, especially moving the hand backwards towards the forearm. Now repeat with the thumb on top, pressing down with the thumb on the top knuckle. Try to rotate the fist with the other hand again. It should be much more difficult to move, and not that much 'thumb pressure' is required to create that 'lock'.

    I have experimented quite a bit with fist formation, given my age and relatively poor conditioning of my knuckles and so on. By repeatedly hitting the bag at various speeds and with various amounts of power, my goals have been to have a more relaxed punch (until the very moment of impact), keep my wrist straight to avoid hurting it, and to avoid hurting my knuckles or the budding arthritis in my finger joints.

    One thing I am absolutely certain of is that the Isshinryu punch we practice is vital for keep my wrist stabilized and having a relaxed punch until the moment of impact. I cannot claim this is true for every human being, but it has always been the transmitted wisdom among Isshinryu karateka and I have also found it to be so. Many think the unique thing about the Isshinryu fist is that it is vertical and delivered without a turning motion, and this is true, but to me what really matters is that thumb on top. Especially the light pressure that serves to lock the wrist (it also helps to turn the fist ever-so-slightly downwards, so that the top two knuckles hit first, which is our way).

    The funny thing is, I've heard criticism of the IR fist for being 'vertical' all the time, which in practice it is not. We don't torque it, true, but we turn it to fit the circumstances. I would not deliver a vertical fist as an uppercut for example. But the fist formation remains the same in all cases.
     

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