Hung Gar

Discussion in 'Chinese Martial Arts - General' started by Zephyor, Aug 19, 2017.

  1. Zephyor

    Zephyor Orange Belt

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    I was looking trough some "hard-style' CMA and for some reason Hung Gar popped in my mind. I didn't knew anythign at all and i did some research that can barely scratch the surface. Can anyone describe the style to me , and suggest me some other hard styles?
    and by hard, i mean it !
    TY in advance
     
  2. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    You should stop looking and reading and just go train
     
  3. geezer

    geezer Grandmaster

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    Find what's available in your area and then visit a class. Until you give it a firsthand look you'll never know.
     
  4. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    Hung Ga is like being a tank. They place a lot of emphasis on being very rooted and very strong. If you want to be a "Stand your ground" martial artist then this would be a good one for you. If you want to be a mobile fighter that moves everywhere like boxing then this style isn't going to be to your liking. Stance training is vital for Hung Ga because many of the techniques will throw you off balance if your stance isn't strong. I train in Jow Ga Kung Fu which is made of 3 systems and Hung Ga is one of them. If you want to do a lot of fancy high kicks, then Hung Ga isn't for you. It's like trying to get a tank to jump over a car. I actually have to train my jumping ability because the Hung ga that I train reduces my ability to jump. The style has grappling, strong hands, and long strikes. It's known for being powerful, but that just depends on how serious you take the training. Other than that there's nothing special to it. It's practical and useful. I don't think the techniques are difficult to learn, or actually use. The hardest part about using the techniques is trusting that the techniques will work. Sometimes I can do a technique and I feel wide open, but if I follow through with the technique, then I learn that the wide open feeling is actually baiting my opponent. It requires that you trust that the techniques work and that you don't bail out of it. That's pretty much all there is in terms of an over all description. At first it may seem like some of the long fist stuff is outdated but, stick with it and you'll be surprised at how effective that stuff is.
     
  5. Zephyor

    Zephyor Orange Belt

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    First of all I'm quite big ( 6 ft/ 1.83 m, and roughly about 95 kg ... i guess somewhere around 200-210 pounds, Endomorph and Mesomorph mixed bodytype)
    I tend not to be too mobile, rooting might be quite a nice asset of the art. The technical aspects of this art seems quite appealing but after i took the things into the self-analysis area i realised that I am unpatient, and too impulsive, stubborn and headfirst-ish to study kung fu... even tough, seeing the cinematic version of this style ( Sammo Hung, even Tony Jaa in Oong bak 2 ) basicley yells " STUBBORN!!!! "
     
  6. Zephyor

    Zephyor Orange Belt

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    srry i quoted somethign accidentally
     
  7. bak_mei_jr

    bak_mei_jr White Belt

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    I think "hard styles" and "soft styles" are just two different routes to get to the same goal, being both hard and soft. You can't be fast in Hung Ga while you are rooted in a flat stance, you need to be soft and fluid in your transitions. Likewise, the moment you transmit power during a strike in Tai Chi, you have to be hard. Good Hung Ga training does involve lots of stance work and the style certainly doesn't emphasize lots of high kicks.

    The most important choice to make is not which style, but which teacher. If you focus on finding someone that can explain and use the arts concepts, you'll be much happier than picking a specific style.

    Have fun.
     
  8. Martial D

    Martial D Master Black Belt

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    Oh man. My WC Sifu did some hung gar with us, all I remember is the pain....

    Deep horse stances and extended arm poses held rigid for what seemed ike days straight until my whole body was shaking and I wanted to die. If nothing else it will turn you into iron.
     

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