How much should a "yellow belt" know about an art?

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by skribs, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. donald1

    donald1 Senior Master

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    That all depends on a couple factors
    How long has he/she trained in martial arts?
    How long has he/she been a yellow belt?
    Who's is teaching them?

    The average yellow belt is usually limited due to the fact that most people earn their yellow belt in less than a year. However there are exceptions
     
  2. skribs

    skribs Black Belt

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    Donald, my post specifically said 2-4 months if you weren't sure of the time frame.
     
  3. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    I’m not an MA teacher; I’m an academic (science) and physical education teacher, so keep that in mind...

    There’s going to be differences at where kids and adults should be at this stage. And there’s a good variation within each group (5 year old vs 10, etc.). Physical abilities and hinderances/disabilities also play an obvious and realistic role.

    Kids - they pick up gross movements quicker, but generally take significantly longer to get the finer details right. Details like hands up and/or not too close or far out from their body, looking at the target, keeping the strikes at the appropriate target instead of off somewhere else, making a proper fist, etc. Take a roundhouse kick - kids will throw that kick better in a lot of ways than an adult initially, from just watching the kicking leg standpoint. But everything else will take quite some time. Look at basics - they need reminders to use two hands, rechamber, and end the block in the proper place way more than adults do. That’s what I mean by the details vs the gross movement.

    Adults typically take longer to figure out the gross movement. I think they’re thinking about all those details and trying to get them all right at the same time. They’re far more cerebral about it. But once they’ve relatively got it, they need far less reminders and prompts about those details than kids do. The teacher typically sounds like a broken record with the kids’ prompts and corrections vs with the adults.

    At the 2-4 month range, both groups students should be out of that exponential learning curve and tapering off, but they’re still improving at a decent rate. The techniques should look fine, but still needs obvious polishing. The student is conscientious of what mistakes he/she’s personally making and you should see them genuinely trying to correct them. You see the frustration of knowing exactly what it’s supposed to look like but still can’t do it 100%. Basically at this point, they know more than they can actually do. And the technique is far more performance than functional.

    Just what I’ve seen.
     
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  4. skribs

    skribs Black Belt

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    You bring up multiple points I was thinking about creating new threads about. Maybe I should get on that.
     
  5. shihansmurf

    shihansmurf Black Belt

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    I have performance benchmarks for my students at each belt level which trumps time, however most of my students hit what I am looking for at yellow within the time frame specified by the OP. My expectations are as follows.

    1. Solidifying the base. By this I mean that the student must consistently be able to transition from a natural standing position to a neutral bow/boxing style stance as they land a punch or block.

    2. Show basic proficiency with the following movements:

    Inward Block
    Outward block
    Upward block
    Downward Block

    Jab
    Cross
    Hook
    Back Fist
    Inward Elbow

    Front kick
    Side Kick
    Round Kick

    Escape movements for wrist grabs, front choke/grab and push, and side headlock

    Perform and fall safely from ogoshi

    3. Not be overly frightened or timid during sparring

    4. Perform Taikyokyu Shodan without forgetting the steps and with decent body alignment, power, speed...

    Once they have this I promote them to yellow and then start teaching them the material for the next rank with the expectation that their skill with this material will steadily improve.

    Mark
     

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