From Okinawa to Korea

Discussion in 'Tae-Kwon-Do' started by Michele123, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Like General Choi and the ITF, the use of the name Soo Bahk Do didn't come around till long after the unification movement was well established.
     
  2. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I have often wondered about that. Historical evidence of the Japanese trying to turn the Koreans into poor Japanese is recent enough to be incontestable. During that time they destroyed many historical records the Koreans had, except for those few their own historians might have wanted. They also apparently outlawed Koreans studying martial arts except for a very few, and then only Japanese martial arts. They certainly outlawed Koreans speaking their own language.

    However, some records pertaining to Korea apparently survived not only in Korea, but elsewhere, mainly China. China was a suzerain over Korea for a very long time. Then there is the oriental belief that the oldest is best, and native is best, so one should be willing to talk about any skills showing oldest age of the skill in your own country, and your country having the most skilled of the skilled practitioners.

    So how many martial arts were native, from Japan, or from China? Or from elsewhere?

    I have never understood those things since no people of the western world would stoop to such petty actions as that.
     
  3. TrueJim

    TrueJim 3rd Black Belt

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    My understanding is that in 1958 when the Korea Amateur Sports Association (KASA) required that the Korea Tang Soo Do Association and the Korea Kong Soo Do Association to merge (if they wished to become members of KASA), the resulting association chose to call itself the Korea Soo Bahk Do Association. It seems to me that the unification movement was really more of a post-Korean-War thing, is that true? So that'd be about a 5 year difference I think?
     
  4. TrueJim

    TrueJim 3rd Black Belt

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    Is "outlawed" the right word? I was under the impression that it worked more like this: If you were a Korean who wanted to provide for your family, you had better go-along with the Japanese occupiers. Otherwise you would have a very difficult time finding work, keeping a home, sending your kids to school, etc. So it's not that Korean folk traditions were outlawed per se, but boy oh boy...the sooner you completely embraced Japanese culture, the sooner your family will have some rice in their bowls.
     
  5. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    The unification started, was established, was interrupted by the Korean War and resumed after the cease fire.
     
  6. Jaeimseu

    Jaeimseu 2nd Black Belt

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    I’m pretty sure the US flag is displayed incorrectly here. I’m just pointing it out in case it matters to the school owner.


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  7. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Yellow Belt

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    Have been reading the thread, that's really awesome to hear Michele! Always great to hear when people start and how much they're loving it. If you enjoy it, keep doing it! Only gets better! And yeah your experience in the other style will definitely help heaps, but for sure you may have to alter some techniques. I remember when I went from one karate style to another, there were a few habits that I had to change (going from semi-circling the feet when moving in stance to straight line movement, chambering fist higher etc), and it took a little while as they were so ingrained, but got there with enough focus, attention and practice. Always harder to break an old habit than form a new one I reckon ;).

    But enjoy the journey, let us know how it goes :), I also can't wait to get back into training again this year in a new venture, scary but exciting:)
     
  8. TrueJim

    TrueJim 3rd Black Belt

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    You are correct sir. Unfortunately the backs of the banners are white, so they can't be flipped around.
     
  9. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    Banner with stars to right is correct but when displayed with other flags at the head of the room USA Flag should be furthest to the right.
     
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  10. Michele123

    Michele123 White Belt

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    Our association had a sparing seminar yesterday. It’s the first time I’ve sparred in about 18 years, and the first time I’ve ever sparred in Tae Kwan Do. There are a lot of rules for TKD sparring! So many illegal targets! In my Karate Dojo, sparring was for practicing self-defense. There were no illegal targets, though upper belts were expected to not use full power and just tag their opponent. The instructors did emphasize that this is the “sport” side of TKD. I’m not sure I’m a fan of the sport side. I’m not sure I’m not a fan. It is strange sparing but not being able to use practical techniques and targets.


    On another note, I’m definitely not as energetic or in shape as I used to be. The sparing was a lot more exhausting than I remember it being. And I definitely am not as light on my feet as I used to be. That fact is actually kind of depressing. I’m hoping I can get back to close to where I was, but I am guessing I will never be back to 18 year old me. :(


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  11. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Yellow Belt

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    Ah yeah the sparring style may be a bit different, but you may end up really enjoying it. My old style was full contact bare knuckle sparring, but I entered an all-styles non-contact point sparring tournament a few times last year, and I thoroughly enjoy both styles! I like how each type emphasises a different aspect and allows you to work on developing that, so whatever style you enter into, the focus can be on what you can learn and develop in this, rather than what it's lacking. But see how you go anyway :)

    And yeah it'd be challenging getting back into sparring, I'm sure your energy will come back. And whilst it may not be like it used to, you can really start to focus on other aspects of sparring, like not so much explosive quickness, but being smoother, working on angles and footwork off to the sides, accuracy etc. Speaking to many older martial artists, most of them speak of how they're not as fast as they were etc, but that they really can deepen their practice and work on how to generate power etc without big grand speedy movements. I'm 30, and I definitely can feel more niggles and I don't recover as well as I did in my 20s. But it's given me a deeper understanding of how the body works, how I can recover better, and also to focus more on warming up, and learning the importance of mobility and relaxation etc, and I'm usually able to still train in a similar way, but smarter now hehe
     
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  12. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    Well, I wasn't there, but I have had Koreans tell me it was prohibited. Law? I can't promise that was so, but it was apparently enforced as if it were law if it actually wasn't. As I mentioned, the prohibition against speaking Korean was apparently some form of law or regulation. There were boxes at the police boxes to pay the fine on the spot, or so I was told.
     
  13. TrueJim

    TrueJim 3rd Black Belt

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    Same here; the older Korean gentleman who spoke with me about it didn't know if it was "law" per se, but he said it was very clear that if you didn't go along with those kinds of prohibitions, your family was going to suffer. I have heard some revisionists exclaim, "But it wasn't illegal!" -- but I don't think the revisionists are giving enough weight the fact that a prohibition can be even more chilling than a law (since the victim can't even rely on the courts for recourse).

    And then of course after the occupation ended, what becomes of the people who did "go along" with the occupiers in order to protect their families...now they are branded as "sympathizers"? It must have been nightmarish.
     

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