Footwork

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by Kung Fu Wang, Jan 10, 2019 at 5:35 PM.

  1. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Should you treat this kind of footwork training as your highest priority of your MA training? If you can always run your opponent down, what else do you need? Your thought?


     
  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Being able to pressure and take control is a useful skill. I can't really say whether that footwork is useful for that - it wouldn't work well for me, but I'm not trained for it.
     
  3. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

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    he isn't light on his feet, is he ?
     
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  4. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    I don't like it. I think I understand it, and if it's what I think it is then, the footwork isn't "Running down " an opponent. It's just separate advancing pieces of foot work. Each forward movement is just a singular advance in the attack and not a chained advanced. I created something similar 5 years ago but with a different focus. For me the focus isn't footwork, But the footwork is trained as a by product.

    The part that I don't like is that the strikes are limit and very linear which is also why I think that each strike is a separate advancing attack and not a chained one. If that's the case the drill for the foot work is good enough. Still don't like it but that's the only way that video makes sense to me.
     
  5. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    My thoughts is that the fighter should be heavy on the feet when advancing. Bad things can happen if you come in light on your feet. Retreating should be the opposite unless you are thinking about countering while retreating.
     
  6. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

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    I'm not convinced about foot stamping, gazelle or even lion like movement seem quicker and more efficient and you have significant. forward momentum in your punches
     
  7. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    There is a time to light. There is a time to be heavy and grounded even if it is but an instant in time.
     
  8. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

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    yes I can see a firmly placed foot is useful, but that's still not excessive stamping, as seen in that vid , he isn't even rebounding of the?? floor, to borrow force, he is just stamping, like an angry child, at the very least it slows him down
     
  9. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Every step can be a knee stomping. Every knee stomping can be a step. The harder that you stomp (even if it's just the look), the easier that you can force your opponent to step back.

     
  10. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    I don't know the significance of the foot stomping. I don't know if it's related to the stance or if it's conditioning for the feet to make stomping on a down enemy more productive.
     
  11. wab25

    wab25 Purple Belt

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    Only if this is the type of MA that you study. I think foot work is very important to MA. I think many people get bored with it, and don't develop it as they should. You do get a lot from proper foot work. However, it must be the foot work that your MA uses. Would it be useful for me to train that foot work for use in Danzan Ryu? No. Karate? No. Aikido? No. If you are studying that particular MA, sorry I don't know what MA it is called, then absolutely. If that is your art, you should study that foot work, and be able to explain what it is used for... more than just to apply pressure and chase down someone. How does that foot work effect the techniques done, the distance, generate power, generate speed...? Stomping the knee is a great explanation for some of the foot work shown there.
     
  12. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Let's leave the MA style along and just discuss the logic here.

    - When you enter, you have to pass the kicking range before you can enter the punching range.
    - When you enter the kicking range, either you let your opponent to kick you, or you kick your opponent.
    - Since a high kick may have risk for being caught, the knee stomp (or foot sweep, or low roundhouse kick) is much safer to do.

    It doesn't matter which MA system that you train, when you enter your opponent's kicking range, he will kick you. In stead of to let your opponent to kick you, it's better for you to kick him.

    If we apply this logic, the "knee stomping" can be used by all MA systems as part of the "entering strategy".
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019 at 2:00 PM
  13. wab25

    wab25 Purple Belt

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    Are you saying that no matter what style of MA we study, we should also study this Chinese Art's foot work?

    In my experience, there are many ways to enter and pass through kicking range. Different arts choose different methods, as those methods set up what that art is looking for. Some arts actually don't want to be any closer, and want to stay in kicking range...

    Your knee stomp is just as vulnerable to a foot sweep, as a kick is to being caught. I study foot sweeps and reaps much more than catching kicks... so I prefer an opponent to pressure me with knee stomps. I like hip throws... so I don't want to be forcing my opponent backwards as I enter... means I have to go further. If I can get him to step forward while I enter, I can use his momentum for my throw. So, I wouldn't want to stomp his knee and force him back.

    Should this thread be titled "knee stomps" instead of "footwork?"
     
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  14. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    There are many advantage to obtain the leg contact. The knee stomp is just one way to establish leg contact. You can achieve that by foot sweep or low roundhouse kick as well.
     
  15. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    Several martial arts have stomping within drills. It usually has nothing to do with stomping but committing to dropping the weight.
     
  16. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    You can also use your knee stomp to bait your opponent's foot sweep.

    - You use knee stomp.
    - Your opponent sweeps your leg.
    - You bend your knee. Let the sweeping leg to pass under.
    - You then sweep his sweeping leg.

    This is why MA is fun. Either you will fall into your opponent's trap, or your opponent will fall into your trap.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019 at 3:33 PM
  17. wab25

    wab25 Purple Belt

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    Agreed. But, every different MA has different traps that they like to set. Because of this, they have different types of foot work, which allow them to set the traps that they prefer. One trap is not "better" than another. One trap is "different" than the other. Different traps are set up differently, rely on different principles, and have different goals. Thus, they have different foot work. If knee stomps, to drive your opponent back, is part of your MA, then maybe this foot work would help. If your MA has other goals, or other traps... then it would be good to practice the foot work from your own art, the foot work that supports the traps you like to set.

    I see nothing wrong with the foot work shown. I don't understand it much either, as I have not studied that foot work or even style. I am also not knocking it. I am pointing out that its usefulness depends upon what the principles, goals and strategies are of the MA that you are studying. For some MAs, this would be very helpful, other MAs less and for others not at all. But that is more to do with the types of traps each MA likes to use, not a reflection on who has the best traps.

    High kicks, knee stomps and foot sweeps all have risk of being countered. They can all be used effectively. They can all be used as feints to set up the counter to the counter. None of them is the magic "I win, you lose... everytime" technique. That technique does not exist.
     

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