Every fight is potentially a life-or-death event

Discussion in 'General Self Defense' started by Bill Mattocks, Aug 8, 2017.

  1. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    It can, but that's situational. If it's some goomba on the street, there's little downside to him talking **** with his buddies that night. Most of us don't live in an area where we have to worry about gangs and such. With bullies, fighting is rarely necessary to back them down - that willingness to fight that DB and others have mentioned usually does the trick.
     
  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    That has never been an issue with defense, though. And there's always a risk of someone getting hurt, if you train with any intensity.
     
  3. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    "The Gambler" was often used to refer to the singer, himself.
     
  4. jobo

    jobo Master of Arts

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    so your wrong then and ate just scratching about making up silly excuses, sometime you have to admit your mistakes to be a man
     
  5. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    Unclear, not wrong. If I'd said "That's a misquote of Kenny Rogers", it would have been clearer than saying, "That's a misquote of The Gambler".

    I was wrong in another post when my mind leaped straight from a Beastie Boys song to the Twisted Sister song I always think of with it. In this one, I was just communicating badly.
     
  6. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    Quite correct. Except at what point do you have enough information to know if you are in a situation of kill or be killed? If it is after you have begun to fight, it is probably harder to get out of the situation.
     
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  7. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    Good point. Hopefully before you eye gouge the guy or curb stomp his head. :)
     
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  8. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    Quite true, and I think that was Bill's original intent, that it is often better to just get away than have a consequence of maiming or killing an opponent (or being maimed or killed).

    BTW, I seem to be noticing a trend (this is anecdotal, as I haven't taken time to look up any statistics) where robberies more often turn to attempted or actual murder. It used to be that victims were told to simply give up valuables and let the miscreant get away. Now it seems to happen more that victims are shot or stabbed. Have you noticed any such thing in your part of the country?
     
  9. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    Not enough information. Homicide is exceedingly rare, even in the most dangerous areas. Homicide tends to be crime of passion, gang related, drug related, or just bad luck (I.e. wrong place, wrong time.)

    Used to be, more people were being killed, but it's hard to see that if you don't look at the statistics. Of course, there are areas that at anomalous.
     
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  10. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    So you haven't had to deal with psychological barriers going from threat to action?

    I have it can be a pretty big deal. Springs out on you as well. Sometimes for no good reason.

    It is something worthwile being aware of if you are mentally preparing people for those sorts of engagements. And something the tough guys will rarely talk about.

    You have said you actively avoid intence engagements. Not just don't like them. You don't do them.
     
  11. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Goes back to this fear of risk. You can't deal with the concept where there is risk involved. You are focused on the worst case scenario. And I dont think it helps make rational decisions.

    You either over cook the situation of let it progress too far with inaction.

    Or let it progress to far then overcook it.
     
  12. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Trying to find information on successful risk taking. Which is the crux of this thread.

    Found an opinion piece here. No real studies. But as opinion goes it does seem to gel with what I would consider good risk taking skills.

    Take A Risk: The Odds Are Better Than You Think
     
  13. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    Agreed.
     
  14. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    By the way. Have a look at that article on risk. It comes up with some good points.
     
  15. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    I'm familiar with that author's work. Of the 4 points, the 4th is the one that most applies to me. I definitely tend to underestimate the risk of inaction - this bites me in business on a regular basis. I tend to swing in the other direction on the first two - being overly optimistic about risk. That's actually part of my personality profile, and probably hard-wired, so something I've had to learn to counter with conscious consideration.
     
  16. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    I don't think it is uncommon. It is especially applicable in bouncing. Especially wanting to wait rather than act.
     
  17. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    I can see that. I assume that experience tempers that reluctance, eventually (if they last)? I've been on both sides of that (not bouncing, obviously, but analogous situations), and I'm likely to wait a bit longer than I should, which makes a physical solution more difficult.
     
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