Double-jointed or flexible opponents

Discussion in 'Hapkido' started by skribs, Jul 11, 2017.

  1. skribs

    skribs Brown Belt

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    If you've seen my other thread, you'll see I have a lot of experience in Taekwondo and a tiny bit in Hapkido. We teach hand grabs in our TKD classes, but they're nowhere near the level of what we teach in Hapkido (both to make them a bit safer to practice and to make them easier to learn). When I'm teaching in Taekwondo, I've run into a few issues:

    1. Working with a younger student who is double jointed in his elbows, I couldn't get many of the arm locks to work.
    2. Working with a student who has apparently done tons of pushups and torn up his wrists, he doesn't feel anything when in a wrist lock (but he does in arm locks). I can still take him down with the proper leverage and footwork, but he doesn't feel the pain compliance or the shock that I'm trying to cause.
    Have you guys run into people that certain hapkido techniques just don't seem to work on? What are your suggestions in those cases?
     
  2. Jaeimseu

    Jaeimseu Black Belt

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    I've run into plenty of people who didn't feel much/any pain from certain techniques, and also people who were ultra sensitive to certain techniques. I'd suggest always having a plan B.


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  3. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    One of the most, if not THE most, important aspects of self defense is the ability to adapt to whatever comes your way. I believe this especially holds true when dealing with a person who has hypermobility - {double jointed.}

    When the lock doesn't get the desired result, switch. To whatever, another lock, a takedown, a choke, a throw, a strike, whatever.
     
  4. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    I have given up a double leg over arm bar on a girl. Who just wont tap.
    [​IMG]
    (That is a terrible version by the way)


    You just create dominant position before you arm bar so you are not desperately relying on it. and then just move to something else.

    Which you should be ready for anyway.
     
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  5. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I had a student who related his son was unmindful of the zygomtic nerve pressure point, but the ulnar nerve pressure point at the elbow would make him scream like a baby.

    Have you asked your teacher about it? Although there are indeed people who are less sensitive to some of the pressure points, many times it is a question of getting it just where it should be, since some people may have slight differences in their anatomies. Same with joint locks. I would have thought a person who had damaged his wrists would be even more sensitive to wrist locks. Or do you mean his wrists were stronger than most? Are you using the nerve pressure point on the back of the hand to assist when it can be?

    EDIT: Which arm locks were you having trouble with?
     
  6. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    By the way if an arm lock doesn't work. Don't start yanking on it. Reset, revise your technique ask for feed back and reapply the lock smoothly and under control.

    Just in case, and I know this is unlikely, that you are doing something wrong rather than them being freakishly resistant.
     
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