differences in sword styles (kenjutsu, hapkido...)

Discussion in 'Japanese Swords and Sword Arts' started by MAfreak, Mar 11, 2016.

  1. MAfreak

    MAfreak Purple Belt

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    i know about common differences like kenjutsu does kata, kendo does sparring etc.,
    what i'd like to know are technique differences.
    i just did a few sword training as an addition to my weaponless and kobudo-weapons training.
    it was selfstudy from watching videos and live-shows mainly of hapkido over the years and lately training under a kenjutsu black belt.
    from what i saw the strikes and blocks are the same but the footwork made a big difference.
    in my self study i just adapted my common fighting stance (being right-hander > left food forward) and it worked very well for me. but in kenjutsu there was all the time the right foot forward what was confusing me all the time.
    also sliding forward with the front food going first and the rear foot coming after instead of pushing you forward.
    i think i felt like the poor left-hander kids in the past who were forced to learn to write with the right hand.
    okay so i thought my self study failed (while blocking and striking was okay like i learned from the videos)
    but now the interesting fact: i rewatched the hapkido forms and they do, at least partially, the same like i did;
    for example for the forward thrust having the leg on the other side in front (like a cross punch instead of a jab like its done in kenjutsu). what are your thoughts or experiences?
    sure a form is defined but i asked the kenjutsu trainer too if one couldn't adapt ones normal fighting footwork to the sword (before i rewatched the hapkido forms were they do) and he said, it would be slower.
    okay that makes sense and fits to my comparison to the jab and cross punch. but what also would mean that its weaker (which might be okay with an incredibly sharp blade).
     
  2. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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    "Kenjutsu" is a really broad term.

    I'm not too sure what a "kenjutsu black belt" is. Kendo does kyu/dan grades, as does Iaido, but neiter of them are kenjutsu. What school of kenjutsu does your teacher have his black belt in?

    There are both advantages as disadvantages to dominant vs. non-dominant lead in swordsmanship. Dominant foot lead makes determining range easier, since the range is shorter. It also makes the strikes faster, but with less power. This is typically found in modern sporting styles like kendo and sport fencing, and also European military sabre. It was also the default stance for rapier, since it makes use of the lunge, albeit a smaller lunge than you'd see in modern foil.

    With the dominant foot back, one's range is increased, but it is more difficult to find the range. It allows for an attack with a passing step which has incredible power but less speed. It is typical of older styles of sword fighting where the fighters were of a chivalric class and had the time for a lot of training. In both German longsword, and the kenjutsu I've done, attacks are made with passing steps when entering range. It takes a lot of training to attack well on the pass with proper range and timing.
     
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  3. MAfreak

    MAfreak Purple Belt

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    that was another problem i had, nearly no steps, just sliding and let the right foot in front. it felt very stiff to me.
    the black belt is in "jikishin kage ryu kenjutsu". well for being a "kata-art" maybe its just the same like in karate and such, were kata movements also are far away from natural movements like in fighting and even their own kumite.
     
  4. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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    Hard to say. I've watched some clips, and there are passing steps in there as well, so it's safe to say you haven't seen the whole curriculum. Just empty your cup and go with it. Assuming your teacher is legit, it will come together eventually. Just don't assume that you "know" what something is supposed to be because it's like something you've seen before. It might not be.
     
  5. MAfreak

    MAfreak Purple Belt

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    yes well it was one full kata with bunkai (if its called bunkai there too), so i joined an intermediate seminar (without knowing for which level it was) so one more reason why it was hard for me. :dead: but at least not with "just" some beginner techniques.
     
  6. oaktree

    oaktree Master of Arts

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    I think though a block or strike May look same, the idea and principles may be hidden especially in kata, in katori shinto ryu what is presented in Kats isn't necessarily what you would do and what is being done sometimes is modified in Kats to hide the original purposes at least in oral transmission when we talk about the kata.
    Often times sensei would explain concepts of daito ryu and then bring out the bokken to illustrate the point clearer.
     

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