Damascus steel knife blanks

Discussion in 'Knife Arts' started by Flying Crane, Aug 7, 2018.

  1. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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  2. paitingman

    paitingman Blue Belt

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    1095 and 15n20 make some great knives!

    If you have bought from this guy before and like the stuff they sell then go for it.

    That being said, imho, production knives and blanks are more often than not subpar in the quality department. With knives, and most things, you really do get what you pay for. It truly all depends on who it came from and what they did to it. I've come across absolute crap knives of all sorts of steel.

    I would just shoot an email and ask about the hardness and if there's info available on the treatments done to the steel. (the seller not being sure is a bad sign obv)

    I can say that texas knife makers sells a lot of blanks. My buddy has shown me some he's put a handle on and he's never had issues with the quality to my knowledge. I've only used them for handle supplies.
    Either way I hope this helped and I'm sure you'll have some real fun with a project like this
     
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  3. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    I’m not actually looking to make one, but this is good info if I decide to do that in the future.

    I’ve seen a knife in a store that I kind of like, not sure the source nor the maker and the shop owner does not know much either. He gets them through a supplier somewhere. The blanks on that website seem similar to what is on that knife, it’s damascus with the same component steels. So that is a good start, at least.

    I realize that how the steel was treated makes a huge difference, and that is the great unknown in this case. But at least the component steels used to make the Damascus are reputable.

    Blade is something like 5-6 inches, with a fairly nice leather sheath, handle is stacked leather washers with a steel butt-plate. Price is $180, which seems maybe high if the maker just bought the blank and slapped together a handle, but might be a good price if the maker created the Damascus and built it all himself and did quality work on the steel.
     
  4. pdg

    pdg Senior Master

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    If the maker did all the work himself - and did it well - then that price is selling himself seriously short.
     
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  5. paitingman

    paitingman Blue Belt

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    I would bet that they are made from blanks. I've grown to be very wary of any damascus knives from unknown sources.
    Finding good fixed blades for a bargain is very difficult. It's one of my main gripes about knives. There's loads of really great folders for great prices, but fixed blades will make you put up big money, but it's usually worth it if it's worth it to you.
     
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  6. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    Yeah, the more I think about it, the more certain I am that the “maker” simply bought a kit, put it together and sold it to a distributor. If he had really make it from the ground-up, you can bet that his information would be included with it. Given that, maybe I’ll order a kit and put it together, just for fun...
     
  7. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    I was thinking that as well. It’s what made me immediately hesitate when I was looking at it.
     
  8. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    So what do people think of D2 or 1095 steel all by itself, for a knife? If I get a kit to put together for fun, those blanks are cheaper. And of course it ultimately depends on how well the steel is treated, I do realize that. So for the sake of discussion, let’s pretend they are well made and properly treated.
     
  9. paitingman

    paitingman Blue Belt

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    I have no knowledge of D2, but 1095 is great steel when treated properly.

    Takes and holds a really good edge
     
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  10. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    I appreciate the input.
     
  11. frank raud

    frank raud Master Black Belt

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    1095 is a good steel for knives, with the caveat that it is a high carbon steel, so rusts easily. Be prepared to clean it immediately after use, and to keep it oiled.
     
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  12. BrendanF

    BrendanF Orange Belt

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    What the others have said. In addition, of the 10 series steels, 1075 is regarded as the easiest 'beginner steel' to heat treat. But 1095 is a wonderful steel - I'm about to knock up some billets of 1095/15n20.

    But really, all 10 series (the commonly used ones at least, 1075, 1080, 1084, 1095) and 15n20 (which is essentially just 1075 with nickel for contrast) are good beginner steels. But so is O1, W2 etc.

    D2 is essentially 5160 - higher chromium tool steel. Tough as nails. Great steel, but not typically recommended for beginners.
     
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  13. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    What is the minimum carbon point recommended for a blade that is tough and can be properly treated to hold a good edge?
     
  14. BrendanF

    BrendanF Orange Belt

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    I would qualify my response by pointing out that I'm a beginner bladesmith - don't rely on my information alone. There are some fantastic online resources out there regarding smithing, and in particular around different steels and heat treating protocols. Kevin Cashen is the man in this field - google him and you'll find a wealth of info.

    That is not as simple a question as it appears, from what I understand. The use of alloys such as chromium, vanadium, nickel etc has allowed for the development of a variety of steels with differing carbon points which behave in very different ways, with distinct heat treating characteristics.

    In terms of simple carbon steels - of which the 10xx series are the typical examples, a 'high carbon' steel is needed in order to be able to harden to an adequate level to hold an edge. Steels with .04% Carbon are known as 'mild steel' and won't harden sufficiently. .05%, .06% is about where the action starts, and as one increases carbon content obviously (theoretical) potential hardness increases, however brittleness does also. For the unaware, the second number on the 10xx series indicates the carbon content - 1075 has .075%C, 1084 has .084%C etc.
     
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  15. BrendanF

    BrendanF Orange Belt

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    Apologies - I realised too late to edit - I have placed decimals incorrectly in my post above.

    Carbon levels in high carbon steels are fractions of a percent.. not fractions of fractions of a percent.

    ie - 1075 has 0.75%C.
     
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