CMA and kicks?

Discussion in 'Chinese Martial Arts - General' started by wckf92, Aug 9, 2017.

  1. wckf92

    wckf92 Master Black Belt

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    Wondering if anyone can point me towards any CMA's that are predominantly kick oriented? Either Southern or Northern systems?
    Thanks!!!
     
  2. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

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    At least Tantui and Chuojiao in the North and Mok Gaa Kyun in the South. Also Dog Boxing, if you count swinging your legs on the ground as kicking. I also remember a mention of some obscure Hokkien village style being famous for kicking...

    Why, though?
     
  3. wckf92

    wckf92 Master Black Belt

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    Excellent. Thank you for the info. I'll look into them as much as I can. I'm simply curious about other Chinese arts that have a robust kicking/leg methods...and how, if at all, it may link or connect to wing chun kicking, etc.
     
  4. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

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    Ah, it was Laixia village Anhai Quan from Yongtai County, Fujian that is famous for it's leg techniques. Good luck finding that.

    If you are thinking about Wing Chun and kicking, you might be interested at looking at the PRC standardized wushu-Wing Chun routines (not kidding). They have a surprising amount of kicks and other stuff in them, all within a Wing Chun framework.
     
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  5. KabutoKouji

    KabutoKouji Green Belt

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    There are a lot of kicks in the style of Longfist I train in at YMAA.
     
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  6. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

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    I would guess that YMAA Longfist teaches Tantui Shilu, the Ten Roads, as fundamental material?
     
  7. wckf92

    wckf92 Master Black Belt

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    Cool. Thanks dude!!!
     
  8. KabutoKouji

    KabutoKouji Green Belt

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    I'm not sure what the ending name is of the Tan Tui, but yes we do practice them and in the continuous line form. Lien Bu Chan is one of the forms you start on early also.
     
  9. Midnight-shadow

    Midnight-shadow 2nd Black Belt

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    As noted, dog fist style is a ground-fighting style that focuses a lot of using your legs to take down an opponent rather than the arms. Also modern Sanda uses a lot of kicks.
     
  10. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

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    Tantui Shilu = 弹腿 十路 = Ten Roads of Tantui. Also, 连步拳 = Lian Bu Quan = Connected/Continuous Steps Boxing.

    What is YMAA's curriculum exactly; how many forms do they teach? Is there e.g. Gongli Quan and San Pao Chui?
     
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  11. KabutoKouji

    KabutoKouji Green Belt

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    As I am really bad at remembering the names I am not sure about San Pao Chui but Gongli Chuan I have definitely heard higher grades and instructors talking about. In our school they teach mainly Tan Tui, and Lien Bu Quan for the beginners, and as I am one myself I do not know which main patterns are taught later on. We do a lot of sparring and drills also, and our instructor brings a lot of Sanda throwing techniques in etc. There is a lot of interpretation/bunkai of the Tan Tui and positions/stances in the forms in general, there is often a lot of Chin Na in these parts of training (which I am utterly dreadful at :( ). Ancestral White Crane is in the curriculum, but atm I have not done any forms based on it, though I did have to do it's 6 main stances for my grading. Apparently Master Yang's White Crane influences make their way into a lot of other elements of what we practice, including our TaiJiJuan (which has made it possible for this old man to do Longfist/White Crane another day in the week without being permanently injured) which I do once a week with YMAA also, though as I never did it anywhere else I am not able to ascertain exactly where these elements are apparent, though I think one part might be an emphasis on 'turtle back' type chambering and aggressive Fa Jin from the hips.
     
  12. KabutoKouji

    KabutoKouji Green Belt

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    yes they do 10 or I think maybe even there are 2 or 3 additional Tan Tui
     
  13. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

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    Now this is interesting. I know Dr. Yang Jwing-Ming is of Taiwanese heritage, but I thought that the Taiwanese lineage of Zonghe Crane calls themselves "Shaking Crane" or Zònghèquán/纵鹤拳. The mainland Fuqing lineage is the one who use the "Ancestral Crane" or Zōnghèquán/宗鹤拳 moniker. My Chinese is not good enough to figure out their complete history, but I've seen Wang Xiangzhai's name (founder of Yiquan) mentioned there. It'd be fascinating (yet totally speculative) if it turned out there was Yiquan influence in Zonghe, which would've then spilled into Yang's Taijiquan.

    "Turtle back" is a concept in Zonghe with which I see similarities with Bak Mei posture. It's not surprising since everything in CMA is in the spine, after all...

    EDIT: Oh, BTW. I think Jingwu/ Chin Woo Academy teaches Gongli Quan right after Tantui Shilu.
     
  14. KabutoKouji

    KabutoKouji Green Belt

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    Yeah White Crane lineages and connections are very hard to work out I think - though I watched that Kung Fu Quest docu about White Crane (Fujian) and I did see a lot of similarities to ours, however it seems a bit more upright and straight lined-ish. I'm not sure if we do that Sanchin standing form that's in Karate, as I've never seen anyone in class doing something similar - I would really like to do that form as I think it is beautiful.
     
  15. VPT

    VPT Green Belt

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    I could give you a buttload of Zonghe videos, I think all of their forms are on YouTube. And yes, there is Sanchin/Sanzhan as well.

    I've watched that Kung Fu Quest season two episode as well. I think it was pretty wrong about the Karate connection. The two guys went on verifying instead on falsifying and didn't even bother to check on all the conflicting information.
     
  16. Midnight-shadow

    Midnight-shadow 2nd Black Belt

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    Fujian White Crane is quite different to other crane styles. For one we hardly ever use the "crane beak" and our style more closely resembles wing chun. Then of course you get the tiger-crane version of Fujian White Crane which is what I practice.

     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2017
  17. Midnight-shadow

    Midnight-shadow 2nd Black Belt

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    I'd be very interested to see the Zhonge Sanzhan form to see if it is similar to ours. Also it us common knowledge that Karate originated from the Fujian Chinese Martial Arts.
     

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